Weight Loss Support - Does WHAT I eat matter?




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RadaTwirl
01-19-2014, 09:02 PM
I'm a junk food girl.
My two favorite foods? Tater Tots and cheesecake. With my handy dandy calorie counter app (that allows me 1400 calories a day) I don't restrict myself from certain foods. If I can spend the calories or think it's worth it, I'll eat that cheeseburger. I'll have half of that cheesecake. Or I'll eat those 2 oz. of potato chips.
My question is, does it really matter what I eat as long as I stay under the calories I'm allotted? I don't feel like eating these high-density foods is leaving me unable to eat food.
For instance, 1 tablespoon of canned funfetti frosting is 70 calories. If I feel like I'm about to binge, I carefully measure out a tablespoon and let myself have it, and it works great.
Yesterday, I had two slices of pizza for 300 calories.
I'm also eating healthy, I'm eating dried cranberries, almonds, spinach, lettuce, lots of legumes and all my oils are good healthy oils. Obviously, it's rare that I'm able to chow down on an entire piece of cheesecake, but is there any reason why I shouldn't have some of it?
I feel like restricting myself from things like candy will just make me want to binge. I'm very honest with the amounts that I eat on my calorie tracker.
The only thing I almost completely kicked is my diet soda habit, but I do let myself have 16 oz. once or twice a week, but I used to drink it like water.

I am losing weight and I'm taking my multivitamin.

Yes, I am making a lifestyle change as well, just to clarify. It just may not be quite as drastic as some of the people on here, and the reason for that is simply because I'm young and I think it's a part of youth to be able to eat pizza and not feel totally guilty about it. But many of my habits have changed, I feel like I'm eating very reasonably, like a normal teenage girl eats, but in less amounts.

I want to keep making it clear that I am eating healthy as well, plenty of fruit and veggies and skinless boneless chicken breasts, but I still like to eat sorbet and candy and tater tots (if I can spend the calories) and pasta and pizza.

Am I losing out on something by doing this? I feel like it controls my binging.


Larry H
01-19-2014, 09:21 PM
I am with you. That is what I love most about calorie counting, absolutely nothing is off limits provided I stay within my calorie allowance currently 1,440. If I want to eat 1,440 calories of ice cream I can. Of course if I do that I can eat nothing else that day so I have not done that. I often eat pizza and smaller amounts of ice cream. This freedom keeps me from feeling deprived and rebelling against my eating plan. This is a great way for me to eat.

IanG
01-19-2014, 09:47 PM
Look, for weight loss it is going to work. My diet started out pretty much just by cutting down on what I was already eating.

But fast forward a year and I am eating completely different and healthier foods. What's the difference? Well, I can eat more and still lose weight (mostly). And I get other health benefits beyond weight loss. For example, my hair, eyes and skin look and feel better from eating a more balanced diet. I am also off BP medication and cholesterol medication.

So do what works but keep an open mind to making positive changes. I did and it worked wonders!


kelijpa
01-19-2014, 09:58 PM
Sounds like you are finding a healthy balance. If measuring out a treat is helping you control bingeing that is great.

Having a planned treat on the weekend keeps me on plan during the week and is working well for me.

Wishing you continued success :sunny:

Great comment from Ian So do what works but keep an open mind to making positive changes. I did and it worked wonders!

Chardonnay
01-19-2014, 10:47 PM
I believe in the calories eaten vs. calories burned idea. Although I know that certain foods slow down my already damaged metabolism, like dairy and alcohol. If I only ate 1800 calories worth of wine and cheese each day, I'd not be losing as quickly as if I had 3 nutritious meals with fruits, veggies etc and moderate wine. Not to mention I'd be sick as a dog from heartburn and other not-so-fun digestive issues!!! But that's my body. I always make allowances for things I love so that I don't feel deprived.

Jacqui_D
01-19-2014, 11:04 PM
To answer your question "Does it matter what I eat," yes, it does matter what you eat, and if you were eating nothing but junk food, there would be a reason to be concerned because the quality of food you eat matters to your health. However, it sounds like you eat healthy foods. You just choose also to have some treats within your calorie limits, and if that's working for you, I don't see any reason to change it.

Moving Forward
01-19-2014, 11:36 PM
From the sounds of it, you've found a nice balance. The habits you will maintain are the habits you can live with.

Sasha29
01-20-2014, 01:52 AM
What you are doing sounds totally reasonable. I'm impressed that you can stop at two slices of pizza or one spoonful of frosting. To stop my bingeing, I had to cut those things out completely because I could never stop at just two slices. So good for you!

The only thing I would suggest is to keep an eye on how your body feels after eating certain foods. You may discover that certain foods slow down your weight loss or make you feel sluggish after eating.

Samantha18
01-20-2014, 04:26 AM
That sounds like a good plan. Moderating yourself around the more junky food, while still enjoying it and fitting in more veggies and fruit is a maintainable plan. I've lost weight the day after eating Mcdonalds, Pizza Hut, etc... because it was within my calorie count.

However, it's good to try and balance the junk with healthy food. Like, if I have pasta, I have a side salad so I'll feel full and eat less pasta. But it sounds like you already fit in plenty of healthy food with your plan!

nelie
01-20-2014, 07:46 AM
I lost over 100 lbs having pizza almost every week. It is amusing because I'd have a whoosh in weight the day after I ate pizza. The pizza started being sausage with veggies and then eventually just became a veggie pizza. I also started eating 3-4 slices (half a medium) to 2-3 slices and then eventually 2 slices. I eventually gave up the pizza because I gave up the cheese but it was an interesting phenomenon.

(and my confession is I never cared much for pizza before my weight loss efforts but we found a nice local place with a non-oily crust that was delicious and they had a ton of different vegetable toppings)

diamondgeog
01-20-2014, 08:47 AM
My 'vice' is still eating out a lot. But my regular meals have gotten a lot healthier. Eating out isn't something I have wanted to give up. But it is working out in my overall lifestyle now. And I do make better eating out choices.

I will say my focus is on health first and weight is related to that. You could probably lose weight on an all 'junk' diet. But that person would not be healthy.

BTW, I know the OP was not describing an all junk diet.

Robsia
01-20-2014, 09:02 AM
I think allowed, counted and planned for treats are fine.

Friday night is pizza night at our house. I buy one large Chicago Town stuffed crust pepperoni pizza from the supermarket. Of it I have a third, which is just under 600 calories, which is still okay for a main meal. And there is none left when everyone has finished so no temptation.

However if I was at pizza hut and we ordered a large pizza, it would be far larger than the one I buy, and I would be hard-pressed to resist eating more than my 600 calories, so eating out is difficult.

freelancemomma
01-20-2014, 09:29 AM
Well, the proof's in the pudding, isn't it? Your system seems to be working for you both physically and mentally. It has also worked very well for me in the past: I lost 30 to 50 pounds on several occasions without restricting any foods and allowing myself regular treats. I regained the weight not because the system didn't work, but because I began overeating again. I've now been maintaining a 50-pound loss for over two years with no off-limit foods. (For example: last night I went out with a friend and had a fancy coffee with two types of liqueur and a mountain of whipped cream.) The difference is that I don't pig out as frequently and compensate for it when I do.

Freelance

p.s. I don't consider cheesecake junk food. It has cream cheese and eggs, right?

OhThePlaces
01-20-2014, 09:46 AM
I got to goal in 2011 eating small servings of pizza, ice cream, and whatever else I wanted. Of course, I gained half of it back in 2013 when I through "suggested serving sizes" to the wind. This time I'm incorporating more whole foods (and making a big green smoothie once a day) but will also eat small amounts of junk as long as it fits into my calorie allowance.

seagirl
01-20-2014, 02:31 PM
Really only you can answer that by experimenting. Are you feeling good? Are your skin/hair/nails feeling and looking healthy? Do you have a lot of energy to do the things you want to do? Is the weight coming off the way you want it?

yoyoma
01-20-2014, 08:17 PM
It can matter for some people.

It sounds like you are eating mostly nutrient-rich foods, which is important. I think we all know that people can't live a long, healthy life on a diet of twinkies (even though they could lose weight if they didn't eat too many of them).

You are the expert on how well you handle the occasional tablespoon of frosting or serving of tater tots. Some people feel the need to integrate treats into their diet else they feel deprived and binge. Other people feel the need to expunge them from their diet because even small servings trigger binges.

Do what works for you, and if you find that it stops working, switch it up! There are many ways to success and what works for you in the future may not be the same as what works for you now.

Good luck in meeting your goals!

crispin
01-20-2014, 09:18 PM
Sounds fine to me. :)

CrabNebula
01-21-2014, 11:54 AM
I still eat donuts and bake orange rolls. I have learned how to be far more conscious about how much I am eating and it has made all the difference. I use a salad plate as my dinner plate. I strive to never go for seconds.

I also stopped baking cookies and other crap like that every night. I've cut it down to two times a week with the rest of the week being sugar-free cocoa for dessert.

I will say I was never a binge eater, I just was oblivious to how much I was eating. A little more here and there and there adds up. So moderation works for me.

Wannabeskinny
01-22-2014, 09:15 AM
I'm a junk food girl.


I'm young and I think it's a part of youth to be able to eat pizza and not feel totally guilty about it.

I'm not going to argue with you. Everyone has to find their own path and if you are able to maintain a balance of indulging in processed foods without veering from your goals then keep on. But I just want to say that calling yourself a "junk food girl" might be dangerous. Defining who you are by the indulgent foods you like to eat is a small but perceptible set back in the long run. Why not call yourself a salad girl? A salad girl who occassionally licks a spoon of frosting. There, now doesn't that put a better spin on it? My point is don't pidgeonhole yourself.

Ah, to be young. You know what they say, youth is wasted on the young. Nobody at any age should feel guilty about what they eat. BUT on the otherhand, something that I wasn't taught when I was young that I wish I would have learned was a sense of responsibility. Believe me, my bad habits have existed for decades. And I was a bombshell, looking at my pictures from the "past" I can now understand why I had so many boys chasing me although I didn't see it then. The problem is that those habits catch up to you, they really really do. And those terrible little frosting habits that cause such little harm now, well they balloon up to massive sugar addictions that wreak havoc on you metabolism. I'm not trying to scare you, just letting you know that getting in control of your cravings is important to do while you're young. If I had known then what I know now I would've done things a lot differently.

scarletmeshell
01-23-2014, 10:14 AM
I have sugar free low fat ice cream almost every night. I measure it and enjoy it. The only time I don't eat it is if I am out of it or it would put me over my plan for the day.

Velvet bean
01-23-2014, 11:23 AM
I think it matters what you eat, but not that much that you shoud do diets that make you uncomfortable.

For example: I know a research where they had 3 groups of people eating 1000 calories per day. The first group's diet was composed mostly of proteins, the second group's diet was mostly carbohydrates and the third group mostly fats. Those on the high fat diet lost the most, the high protein dieters lost somewhat less, and the high carbohydrate dieters lost the least weight.

But a more recent study showed that the low-carbohydrate diet produced a bit greater (4% more) weight loss than did the conventional diets for the first six months, but the differences were not significant at one year.

diamondgeog
01-23-2014, 01:31 PM
I am extremely cautious about sugar free low fat stuff or just low fat stuff. My new mantra is if it says diet anything I stay way away from it. Diet stuff isn't.

First low fat almost always means high carb. Almost always better off with the fat. The low fat is just going to spike blood sugar and often the carbs get stored.....as fat.

Sugar free stuff has often nasty artificial sweeteners. They have been linked to cancer and they also mess with and confuse your metabolism and can keep sweet cravings.

If I am going to have something at all I'd rather have real sugar in a treat. Although I have kicked my treat habit pretty well.

We have taken all low fat stuff out of our household. Also need to be cautious of gluten free. Often other flours just as high in carbs are used in place.

nelie
01-23-2014, 01:38 PM
I think it matters what you eat, but not that much that you shoud do diets that make you uncomfortable.

For example: I know a research where they had 3 groups of people eating 1000 calories per day. The first group's diet was composed mostly of proteins, the second group's diet was mostly carbohydrates and the third group mostly fats. Those on the high fat diet lost the most, the high protein dieters lost somewhat less, and the high carbohydrate dieters lost the least weight.

But a more recent study showed that the low-carbohydrate diet produced a bit greater (4% more) weight loss than did the conventional diets for the first six months, but the differences were not significant at one year.

There could be a number of reasons for the first study if you go by weight alone. A higher carbohydrate diet means you retain glycogen stores as well as holding more water in the body. A mostly protein or fat diet would result in glycogen stores emptying and less water. It could result in quite a different weight difference even without losing any fat. You'd need to compare fat loss, not just weight loss.

SweetCurves32
01-23-2014, 01:54 PM
In my opinion it truly does matter. You can lose weight eating junk food while staying within your calories. However in the end it will affect the way that you feel. I am losing weight because I want to feel better. I want to be healthy and active. The better quality food you eat, the better you will feel. In saying that, I am all about still being able to eat the not so good for you food. I have to enjoy everything that I eat. I have learned (and am still learning) that moderation is key. Eat healthier foods 80% of the time and 20% of the time enjoy your favorite less healthy ones.

coolacrity
01-23-2014, 01:55 PM
I am so with you. This is how I lost so much in the first place. I wasn't all finding tasteless substitutes for stuff I liked. If it was in my allowance, I ate it if I wanted it and I felt good enough for it (like if I didn't have a stomachache or something). Eating normally is my goal, and generally young people eat pizza and stuff. Generally. Young people that don't are awesome, too.

Wannabeskinny
01-23-2014, 02:46 PM
You know what they say, you are what you eat.

MarliQQ
01-25-2014, 05:56 PM
You know what they say, you are what you eat.

Lol, I don't mind being called cupcake, because califlower sounds dumb :dizzy:.

diamondgeog
01-25-2014, 06:11 PM
Listened to this really good radio interview of Dr. Lustig posted in the News and current events forum.

He pointed out 80% of obese people have weight related medical issues.

But 40% of normal weight people do. They are actually a bigger drain on health care. They carry a lot of fat inside. They are normal weight but 'fat' inside. Probably from not moving enough but also from what they eat.