Weight Loss Support - Why are we fat?




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LordieBee
01-17-2014, 02:09 PM
I wanted to ask everyone why we, as individual people, overeat. I've lost weight in the past, but never managed to keep it off. I understand that I need to address the real reasons for my serious overeating problem. I don't have the money for regular professional help, so I get to do a little DIY soul searching and thought it would be interesting to see what other people have to say.

I over eat to avoid my problems. I use it as a means of procrastination, because doing something I enjoy is easier than real life.
I have a high stress job that I'm currently trying to quit.
I eat to avoid dealing with men. I have a brief history of abuse and distrust men in general. I'm always uncomfortable when men give me attention.
Mostly, I don't love myself. I need to learn how and find a sense of self worth. That's just not something I've experienced before.

How have some of you over come your problems? What are you currently doing to change the way you cope with your reasons for over eating?


Locke
01-17-2014, 02:16 PM
My life changed when I read the book "Brain over Binge" by Kathryn Hansen. Basically it doesn't really matter why you overeat. You overeat because your brain gives you the urges to overeat. Therapists say that you overeat because of X reason (let's say loneliness) and so to cure overeating you just need to cure loneliness. The problem is that everybody's lonely at some time or another, and not everybody binges because of it. If you can ignore those urges to binge (no matter their source) then overeating will never be a problem. I have not overeaten since I read that book, and it's been almost effortless.

I've been overeating for much of my childhood and adult life. When I was a little girl I was sick a lot and wore size slim children's clothing. I was a stick. I think that because of being deprived of calories through illness my body urged me to binge on calorie-rich foods, and those binges became a habit that I still struggle with today as an obese person. The exciting thing is that habits can be changed, it just requires practice. The cure to overeating is to not overeat when your brain tells you to- after a period of time your brain will stop sending you the signals because they no longer work.

underanalysis
01-17-2014, 03:01 PM
My family put a premium on my ability to eat as a child. My parents (especially Dad) show they care through food, so saying no to food from them is not just a waste of money, but a rejection of affection. My parents would literally brag to their friends about how much I could eat where I could hear them as a child, which resulted in years of overeating to the point that I was sick after meals as well as overweight.

I dropped a lot of weight as soon as I moved to my first place of my own at age 17, because for the first time I had control over what I ate, when I ate, and how much.


LordieBee
01-17-2014, 03:03 PM
I looked the book up on amazon and it has some pretty great reviews, with the exception of some naysayers. I think I'm ordering it. The philosophy behind this book is pretty similar to how I've thought of my binge ED in the past. It would be incredible to not be at war with myself for the rest of my life. Thanks for the suggestion.

You said you were still overweight. How long ago did you read this book?

Bellamack
01-17-2014, 03:11 PM
Remember: There are so many things in life that we have absolutely no control over. You do have control over this, so work hard every day to embrace that control.

Good Luck to you, you are on the right path, as you are asking "why"

Radiojane
01-17-2014, 03:44 PM
I think mine rooted from it being a simple (and affordable) pleasure. I couldn't travel or buy things, but I had a budget for food.

Retraining myself to other pleasures (while not setting myself up for another addiction), is a huge thing for me.

Locke
01-17-2014, 03:49 PM
You said you were still overweight. How long ago did you read this book?

I should have clarified that- I only read it last week so I can't say that I'm completely changed for good or anything like that. But for me going a week without binge eating is HUGE, and to not be struggling with the urges to binge eat is equally life changing. Something changed inside me when I read that book, I feel like it's the beginning of a different way of being in the world for me.

crispin
01-17-2014, 04:00 PM
I have a big appetite,
love everything about food - shopping for it, cooking it, eating it, trying new restaurants,
my appetite becomes even bigger if I eat too many carbs and too little fat and protein,
I have couch potato tendencies.

Sometimes I eat when I'm not actually hungry. The reasons vary - boredom, it's super tasty, socializing. I don't want to become too rigid. I'm ok with eating when I'm not genuinely hungry. My goal is simply to keep that in check by being mindful of it and not consuming too many extra calories that way. (I'm in maintenance.)

pixelllate
01-17-2014, 04:03 PM
Physically it is because I like eating. Emotionally it is because I grew up in a narcissist household with issues including food, so when problems happened in my life, I assumed that I was weak and needed to rely on food to cope. I rarely speak to my family now so since I've been in a better mental health situation, it has been pretty fine.

diamondgeog
01-17-2014, 04:22 PM
Think about America 50 years ago. Obesity was super rare. Overweight was a lot less than it is now.

Were Americans that different 50 years ago? Were they less emotional, more in control, somehow fundamentally differently in brains and moods? No. So I would argue it isn't mostly emotional for most people. People would be shocked by this but people are actually exercising MORE on average than 50 years ago. That source was from the UK but it would not surprise me for the U.S. or about the same.

So what has changed in the last 50 years ago? The food environment. Dramatically. Way more processed food. And monster processed food. Yogurt that is worse than candy bars. Fruit juices that will send you into a sugar coma. Super sizing. Tons of advertising. Fast food everywhere. Most importantly to me SUPER addictive food. Read Salt, Sugar, Fat by Moss. Shocking what has been done by food companies.

So what to do? Act like it is 50 years ago. Literally don't eat anything you couldn't buy 50 years ago. Cook at home more. I am now using slow cookers more. I get 2 to 3 days of meals. I can prepare it the night before. Just turn it on in the morning and it is there when I get home.

The end of overeating sounds like the concept behind behavior modification. They found it was more effective for shy people, as an example, to do non shy behaviors rather than talking it out as to why they were shy. Eventually the learned to be less shy regardless of any remaining 'root causes'.

For me it was going cold turkey on the worse foods I had daily: bread, pasta, potatoes, fast food, candy, cake etc. After three weeks I was a different person in regards to food, hunger, and the control it had over me.

laciemn
01-17-2014, 04:27 PM
I definitely think part of it is my somewhat small social circle and the fact that I don't really know a lot of fit and health conscious people. My family were definitely the opposite and it's very encouraging to meet other people who are into taking care of themselves. Besides that, a lack of exercise and overeating due to stress.

nelie
01-17-2014, 04:28 PM
We can also go back 50 years where home computers didn't work, people watched tv rarely, kids played outside, more jobs were manual. Depending on your class status, you may have relied more on public transportation. Overall, we were more active as a people until the digital revolution.

Kate79
01-17-2014, 04:36 PM
For me it's:
Hypothyroidism
Depression, anxiety and the binge disorder that resulted from both of them
Fear of working out because I was bullied badly in gym class, starting in kindergarten.

I tried losing weight many times in my life, but it never worked until I began getting those things treated in early 2013.

diamondgeog
01-17-2014, 04:36 PM
Nellie,

I feel thinking about your food habits like it was 50 years ago is a wonderful way to get people successful at weight loss. It has helped me dramatically. If anyone wants to keep eating modern processed food concoctions, no one will stop them.

I should also say there is an argument that wheat has changed dramatically in the last 50 years. Not by the newer techniques of genetic manipulation but by genetic crossing to produce high yield varieties. Wheat Belly makes this argument.

Anyone can do their own research on it. Cutting out wheat has helped me a lot. I feel much better than I ever have in my life. Oh no, people will say that is crazy wheat is just wheat same as always. Again no one stopping anyone from eating wheat. And no I haven't replaced it with other grains. I still do eat a small amount of grains but not wheat for the most part. And yes people can say I am eating healthier overall. This is true. But Wheat Belly argues wheat has changed for the worse in ways other grains haven't. Although the high glycemic indexes of other grains also make them not a good choice.

Movement is very important. But the SAD diet is making people hungry and tired all the time. It has been the defense of food companies the last 50 years. Don't blame us. You aren't moving, you are eating too much. When they know darn well that their products are often a big part of WHY people move less and are hungry all the time. You can't address those two things unless you get off of their highly addictive, lethargic inducing foods. Misdirection. Brilliant, but deadly, to us.

And I shouldn't say you can't move on a highly processed food diet. It just makes it a lot harder. Tying your legs together and then trying to complete a 5K. Not very effective and tends to make people give up.

sept2012
01-17-2014, 05:18 PM
For years and years I have struggled not only with my weight, that is a given or I would not be here, but I have also struggled with inflamation, allergies, a cronic sinus infection and on occassion hives and rashes. Once I start talking about this to doctors they will instantly tell me to remove dairy from my diet and to start eating a balanced diet of "Healthy" grains, vegetables and proteins.... I am here to say that it is not dairy. It is wheat for me. I have been in a bar (yes drinking beer - a hefewizen) and broke out in a rash - up both of my arms with my face bright red and burning. I have had a "high" gluten day and had my lips swell up to the size of Angelina's. I have had a "Wheat" bagel first thing in the morning and experienced hives on my face. It has taken me years to realize the culprits. Through talking with others and doing research I have decided to call BS on wheat and gluten for me. I don't have celiac disease... I am not on a paleo diet... I am not doing low carb by choice. I've simply stated for 2014 I am completly elimating wheat and gluten (they do not go hand in hand - you can have products that have gluten but not wheat... did you know Soy Sauce has damn gluten). Its a disgrace the engineered products labeled "Healthy" that we put in our bodies... So I have too have read parts of "Wheat Belly". Its crazy how that book just crossed my path and now I am reading these posts. But crazier is now that I have said it outloud and acknowledged what I had feared to be true - its easier for me to walk away from Wheat or any type of flour product. Before I would struggle with eliminating cakes and cookies and anything gooey and baked. Today after 17 days of no wheat or gluten I feel 100% better than I did on Dec 31st. Its no longer a struggle. I can walk into a bar or resturant anywhere and have good food. I don't feel restricted and know that I made choices, for my insides, (which will thank me later both on my scale and in the inflamation department) I can feel happy about. I have zero guilt ordering a fully stacked burger (less the bun) with a huge salad. On other "diets" I constantly overanalyzed what I ate. Today I just stay away from Wheat and products with gluten and I am good. I got here emotionally and physically because I put myself last. I am sure there is someone out there that would like to psychoanalyze me and say "you got here because A. B. C., but I call BS on that too. I am a grown *** woman. I have choices and I have made the wrong ones regardless of my emotional state at any given time; I had the choice of what to put in my mouth (if I would have listened to my body 10 years ago when I first started having "allergic reations" to wheat probably would not be here today).. and I also had a choice of whether or not I worked out. At points in my life I have been a runner; a hiker and biker so I know what it feels like and I know what I have to do. It was my choice stopping each one of them.

nelie
01-17-2014, 05:32 PM
diamond, as always, I think 'why we are fat' is multifactorial.

Why am I personally fat? I think again, multifactorial. Partly genetics, both my parents were obese. I grew up eating a pretty unprocessed diet of fresh vegetables, fruit, meat, dairy, grains (mostly rice), etc. Yet I was chubby by age 6, obese by age 10 or so and when puberty hit, I gained 100 lbs within a year. Now I will say I was a kid with average activity. I walked a fair bit, rode bikes, swam, played games outdoors, took dance classes, etc, etc.

I believe hormones, genetics, overeating (large portions) and what not played into my early weight gain. Later on, inactivity, continued large portions played into further weight gain.

Weight loss has been because of limiting my portions, eating better, and increased activity.

Locke
01-17-2014, 05:35 PM
Diamond,

I totally agree with you that American food culture's shift towards convenience and cheap food in the past thirty years provides the bulk of the explanation of the current obesity epidemic. I also agree that Americans are more sedentary now than every, even if we are "exercising" more. Americans didn't need to exercise in the first part of the 20th century because many were working non-sedentary jobs and they didn't spend most of their evenings huddled around the television or computer like we do today.

diamondgeog
01-17-2014, 05:41 PM
Nellie,

Of course it is multidimensional, could not agree more. I in fact did start exercising slightly before changing my diet. But changing diet really helped.

Locke, yes. I agree on that also. Many more sedentary jobs now which compounds the impacts of bad addictive food.

Zigzagzoom
01-17-2014, 06:02 PM
Unhealthy food is so abundant in our culture it's hard to ignore. That being I have a self destructive relationship with food. I have to develop a better relationship with food to succeed.

jhinako
01-17-2014, 07:32 PM
I think we're fat because our portion sizes in this country are seriously out of whack. People still had burgers and fries and pizza 50 years ago, but they didn't eat the monster portions of these things. Burgers were half the size, a slice of pizza was smaller and people ate maybe 2 (smaller)pieces instead of 3 or more person. A serving of french fries was smaller than what comes in a kids meal today. Americans associate the quantity of food with value, so they are served monster portions at restaurants(that usually is enough food for 2 or more actual servings), and then go home and think that's normal and do the same at home.

I, personally, really enjoyed the e-book called "The Overfed Head" by Rob Stevens. You can download the pdf for free if you search for it. It made so much sense to me...if you're not hungry, don't eat. You don't need to eat until you are bloated and full, try ending the meal when you're satiated and comfortable.

I've been following this for a few weeks now I've lost 6 lbs so far and it really has been effortless. I can still eat anything my heart desires, but everything in moderation.

Samantha18
01-17-2014, 07:36 PM
I've realized that most, if not all, of my weight came from eating seconds at dinner my entire life. One plate of something healthy is easily a good 500-600 calories, and I use to eat two full plates unhealthy food that was probably a good 700-1,000 calories a plate, plus whatever else I'd eat during the day that wasn't always healthy. I don't mean one more scoop of something here or there, I mean two huge plates of pasta (both with a slice of garlic bread), two cheeseburgers on the grill with sides, etc... This is just how my family eats (all of who are overweight as well) and I did the same for as long as I can remember. It was automatic for me not to feel satisfied on only one plate, no matter how big or filling the meal was. I've been eating seconds since I was probably about 7 (though I've been fat since I was 4, so it's partly genetic too). Realizing where my excess was coming from my entire life has helped a lot with my journey so far. I still ate seconds at dinner sometimes until recently, but with calorie counting and healthier options, I was able to stay on plan.

I've been seconds free since the 1st though. I'm excited to break the habit that caused most of my weight gain in the first place. It's tricky sometimes not to go back for seconds, even when I'm full. But I think breaking this habit, in addition to the other good habits I've built over the past year or so, will help a lot. I think finding where those extra calories are coming from, whether is be emotional, snacks, sweets, etc... is really important. Because even when you can't stick to plan 100% (like if you skip counting calories for a few days), avoiding your main areas of excess can still help lose weight or at least maintain even when you're not trying too hard.

Dakini
01-17-2014, 08:00 PM
I think it's a combination of many things...

- heredity
- environment (both learning poor eating habits as well as stressful living conditions)
- sugar/salt/fat addiction
- more sedentary lifestyle
- and, of course, emotional eating

Chardonnay
01-17-2014, 08:21 PM
I think that it's just too easy to eat crap these days. Going to buy a 99 cent cheeseburger for lunch seems cheaper and easier than spending $2 on a head of lettuce, $5 on chicken breast and $$$ on other veggies for the salad...then we have to actually take the time to make lunch. Not to mention our lives have become sedentary....internet, smartphones, everyone driving everywhere...we've become terrible lazy. I'm guilty of it myself. I would rather drive to the supermarket that is only 4 blocks away than walk.

I also used to eat a lot more because of depression...it wasn't the eating, it was the drinking. I drank a lot of alcohol to "self-medicate" which of course stimulated my appetite. And when you've had a couple of bottles of wine, you're not reaching for anything healthy. I drink in moderation now and eat much better, but back in the day, I never touched a vegetable.

Interesting topic.

Vex
01-18-2014, 10:45 AM
I think society in general is more overweight now then in the past for a few reasons:

the change in food
availability and price of poor food
technology
more drugs with weight gain side effects
the changes in traditional family structure, including the movement of women into the workplace

However, each individual though has their own specific reasons. For me, it's just that I love sugar and carbs and have an extremely difficult time stopping once I start eating them. How do I deal with that? I honestly would be very unhappy giving them up completely, so I avoid them as much as I can by not having them in my house. I still have them in the places they show up (the office, restaurants, etc) but not having them in my house has made a difference.

thirti4thirty
01-18-2014, 11:51 AM
I overeat because for the few minutes I'm eating, I forget all my emotions. I overeat because I can't separate my emotions from my eating. I eat when I'm happy, I eat when I'm surprised, shocked, angry, lonely, sad, annoyed, disappointed,bored...The least emotion sends me in front of the fridge.
There are times I stand with the fridge door open and then I wonder WHEN and HOW I got in the kitchen in the first place. I seem to be opening the fridge door and the food drawers in a compulsive way.
I remember this sentence on Oprah: "WHAT ARE YOU REALLY HUNGRY FOR?" Finding the answer to that question helps me to remember that I'm almost never hungry for food. I still overeat, snack without being hungry but then I understand myself better. I just started seeing a therapist too. Hope it helps.

Mad Donnelly
01-18-2014, 12:07 PM
Were Americans that different 50 years ago? Were they less emotional, more in control, somehow fundamentally differently in brains and moods? No. So I would argue it isn't mostly emotional for most people
Love your posts. LOVE! (Not just yours, tho, there are several others but I just C&P for brevity)

I'll be honest, I don't want to do a lot of soul searching about why I wanted to eat all the time or why I couldn't identify true hunger. I'm just gonna chalk it up to that's just my body and I just know that I can identify hunger now and I'm not going to eat mindlessly. For some people, that comes naturally.

If I could eat perfectly on "time" I would but who does? Frequently I hear people say, oh, I forgot to eat, or, I just wasn't hungry. It never occurred to me that that is okay, not something to focus on.

"Healthy" grains
lol, yeah, what is that? I have yet to be able to walk into a store and identify from the ingredients the attributes I'm looking for for what is healthy. I am not paying for something just because it SAYS the word "healthy" or "organic" on it and that is exactly what I think is going on in marketing these days. While still eating bread, I was always on the lookout for something labeled "whole wheat bread" that still seemed to actually be WW when I read the ingredients. Much easier for me to just give up the bread altogether, even the "bread" substitutes that some people make.

imabehot
01-18-2014, 12:30 PM
My birth mother was only a little overweight and birth dad has always been skinny. So cant blame genetic in any part. What happened for me was. I started to get depressed and became more aware of the tastes of food. I fell in love with tasting. Now I have fallen out of love and don't have an obsession with taste anymore.Whoo! I just realized there are better things in life than pleasing my taste buds. :)

Mazzy
01-18-2014, 05:32 PM
To answer the original question...

I ate because I was hungry.

Seriously, for a period of 6 months, the time when I gained most of my weight, I was hungry...so whatever was available quickly and tasted good, I ate it. I did not control anything about the food, not the type, quantity, or timing, not the reason, not the method. I gained 50 pounds in 6 months.

Same thing happened with money at the same time. I gave no mind to controlling my cash in any form whatsoever. Went officially bankrupt a year later. I was 22.

But, here's the rub. You can say...aha, there it is, she did not control herself! So, you see, everyone, we must have restraint.... However -

My Ultra-Binge came on the heals of Ultra Deprivation. Prior to 22, I had starved, binged, purged, and exercised from 8 years old, not because I was fat or ugly, but because I wasn't thin or pretty enough. It was encouraged by my family of origin - diets were a weekly affair. Both my mother and father liked to look good and they liked it when other people looked good. It was encouraged by my peers. Looking good was a commodity to them as well. I adopted their desire, but failed to resonate with Why.

I was terribly disconnected from the Why. I did not know for whom I was to eat well or control my money, other than because it's what I was told to do, other than because looking good made people want to be around me, which for people who value appearances, is not an untrue statement.

I have since learned that my appearance is okay TO ME. It may not satisfy everyone else, may not be used to coat billboards across the country (well, maybe someday - but I will refuse Photoshopping of any sort!), but if I were on an island by myself and had no regard for the negative opinions of my peers who weren't able to see me, when I look in the mirror or down at myself I see nothing but creation. This body is pure beauty. This face is God-given.

That's not arrogance. That's gratitude.

My lifetime of deprivation...food deprivation, spiritual deprivation, of only ever being told No, of always being controlled and restricted and insinuations (by self and others) that I wasn't good enough...was unbalanced. At some point, the scales were destined to swing to the other extreme.

I have since discovered that my beauty is perfect as is and that my power is innate. Nature is by far more incredible than my mind can totally grasp. Nature makes my spine move...it sends out neurological impulses. I did not have any say in that. I cannot change a nerve signal just by sheer will. At the same time, I believe that there is a natural drive in me...the nourishing instinct...that knows exactly how much to eat, when, where, how, and why. To rein in that instinct by force to me is disrespectful of the power of the body and the Creator that made it. The hard part is being vulnerable to it in a sea of people who believe you ought to have self-control and look a certain way, people that I want to be loved by, people that are necessary for validation.

I ate because I was hungry. I was hungry for ME. My body was broken. My spiritual bank account was shot. I was bankrupt in every way possible. I ate and my weight swung fast and hard to a place I was afraid to go. But, in that place I learned more about myself than I would have ever learned otherwise. I found me and the "swing" leveled out. One day, I just stopped eating fast food, my daily meals, cold turkey. I didn't want it anymore. I was saved. And now, I have gratitude and I trust.

RadaTwirl
01-19-2014, 04:07 AM
I overeat because I always thought that's just how people ate, especially as teenagers.
Being 16, I don't see people eat well, and I live with my morbidly obese father and I grew up with his eating habits. I just never learned any better and thought that maybe this is just how all teenagers eat. It was all denial.

yoyoma
01-19-2014, 06:48 AM
In my personal case, it's because I end up eating too much.

I get fat on food that most people would consider extremely healthy. Basically no fast food, few meals eaten out, no desserts or sweet snacks, no refined grains or potatoes, etc. etc. But I will eat too much, too often.

I got a reality check one day when I was over a friend's house. She had cooked a family meal and pressed me to sit with them and just "taste" the food (Indian). I did, and I was shocked at how my "tastes," which I thought were tiny, were not much smaller than their full meal servings!

Some people point out that healthy foods (except healthy fats: nuts/avacado/etc) have lower nutrient density and it's hard/impossible to gain weight on them because you get too full before you eat too many calories. That might be true for celery, but believe me, even with a diet that most people would consider beyond healthy, it is possible to get used to eating large enough quantities frequently enough to gain weight.

If I exercised more or if I didn't have a history of yoyo dieting or if I had different genes or if my psychology were different, I would probably be able to lose or maintain just by eating the types of foods I eat.

So, for me the focus has to be on reducing the frequency and/or quantity I eat, and I'm doing that with an eating window. Oddly, the window approach has helped me reduce both the quantity I eat at one sitting as well as the frequency I eat. Other approaches I've tried for maintenance have not proven to be sustainable. Crossing my fingers for this approach.

nelie
01-19-2014, 07:30 AM
lol, yeah, what is that? I have yet to be able to walk into a store and identify from the ingredients the attributes I'm looking for for what is healthy. I am not paying for something just because it SAYS the word "healthy" or "organic" on it and that is exactly what I think is going on in marketing these days. While still eating bread, I was always on the lookout for something labeled "whole wheat bread" that still seemed to actually be WW when I read the ingredients. Much easier for me to just give up the bread altogether, even the "bread" substitutes that some people make.

Healthy grains are generally considered those that are unprocessed/minimally processed and include pseudo grains. Brown rice, kamut, buckwheat, quinoa, amaranth, millet, rye, oats, etc.

As for bread, when I first started, my rule was only 5 ingredients or less. Then I switched to sprouted grain bread like Ezekiel 5:9 but now I make my own bread.

diamondgeog
01-19-2014, 08:43 AM
Yoyoma I would point out that if you were eating as big portions as frequently of 'bad' foods you likely would have gotten a lot bigger than 180.

In the 200s, possibly even 300s.

Mad I agree with you. There is nothing I know of so nutritionally essential in grains that, to me, make it worth 'healthy grains'. My personal journey to health was very much aided when I finally gave up whole grains.

Thousandsunny
01-19-2014, 09:28 AM
I'm heavy because I grew up in a household that loved to Cook and eat. Neither of my parents were overweight (nor are they now, really) and my grandmother was a true beauty who knew how to make the best food ever. Julia Child couldn't hold a candle to my Nona's cooking, haha. So, I grew up loving food. I don't emotionally eat or anything, I just love good food (and the 'good food' that's bad for you!)

When I was in school all the way through my undergrad I wasn't fat, just solid and an althelet. When I left school and stopped playing is where I ran (or rather, didn't run) into trouble. I need to move more and eat less, I know the equations and the nutrition (drilled into me from coaches and nutritionists) but I just suck at follow through.

Mad Donnelly
01-19-2014, 10:53 AM
Healthy grains are generally considered those that are unprocessed/minimally processed and include pseudo grains. Brown rice, kamut, buckwheat, quinoa, amaranth, millet, rye, oats, etc.

As for bread, when I first started, my rule was only 5 ingredients or less. Then I switched to sprouted grain bread like Ezekiel 5:9 but now I make my own bread.

I think my question was more rhetorical. I know what those things are supposed to be, but I am not sure there's any inherently "healthy" foods despite the way we throw that word around.

nelie
01-19-2014, 11:35 AM
I think my question was more rhetorical. I know what those things are supposed to be, but I am not sure there's any inherently "healthy" foods despite the way we throw that word around.

Well in terms of healthy, nothing would be healthy if it was the only thing eaten. I think healthy is fine as long as we understand that you can have a balanced diet and an imbalanced diet. Lots of people have successfully included whole grains into their weight loss plans, others prefer to heavily limit/eliminate. It is finding what works for you.

pixelllate
01-19-2014, 12:20 PM
I'm only addicted to WHOLE WHEAT bread, white bread doesn't really trigger any cravings for me. Is that weird?!

CrabNebula
01-21-2014, 10:46 AM
I wasn't honest with myself at all about what I was eating and how much.

Locke
01-21-2014, 11:39 AM
Yoyoma I would point out that if you were eating as big portions as frequently of 'bad' foods you likely would have gotten a lot bigger than 180.

In the 200s, possibly even 300s.

Mad I agree with you. There is nothing I know of so nutritionally essential in grains that, to me, make it worth 'healthy grains'. My personal journey to health was very much aided when I finally gave up whole grains.

I think some people are talking about different things when they say whole grains. When I say whole grains I mean eating actual whole grains- boiled oat groats, wheat berries, etc. I don't know anyone who has gotten fat eating those foods. Whole grain flour products are a different matter. It's harder to overeat whole wheat bread products, but then again if you have bacon, butter, eggs, and whole wheat toast that's more calories than just the first three.

If you aren't going to watch portion sizes it makes sense cut out food categories or to eat foods in their most whole, unrefined forms. These are just different strategies that work from some people and don't for others. I personally eat whatever I want but I eat very small portions; I also naturally gravitate towards healthier foods like egg whites and vegetables for breakfast. I eat a bagel with cream cheese once a week for a treat. That works for me but for someone else that's not going to do the trick because they won't feel full and crave more.

There is one single weight loss strategy that is the best- and it's different for everyone. :)

diamondgeog
01-21-2014, 01:12 PM
I'm only addicted to WHOLE WHEAT bread, white bread doesn't really trigger any cravings for me. Is that weird?!

That actually isn't weird. Some people but the glycemic index of whole wheat breads higher than white breads and even higher than sucrose.

Locke agree with you everyone is different. When the average person says whole grains, and certainly I meant it this way also, I am talking about mainstream whole wheat bread and pasta. Those are what I used to eat and they kept me very hungry.

But good points there are other foods whole grains term applies to.

novangel
01-21-2014, 01:23 PM
I ate more calories than I could burn by not moving. Too much sitting on the couch and eating at restaurants. That's it in a nutshell.

shr1nk1ngme
01-21-2014, 01:48 PM
(This time) I got fat even though I eat 99% whole foods and am a vegetarian.

-- By eating too many legumes (carbs) and not enough actual vegetables, by not exercising portion control, and by being sedentary. By being in denial about my weight gain and then, later, by being afraid to weigh myself.
--Thus failing to discipline myself to maintain a reasonable weight.

yoyoma
01-22-2014, 12:52 AM
Hi, shrinking... I so know what you mean. A pot of red lentils is like a siren song. I'm not a vegetarian, but I have plenty of issues in the plant kingdom.

Like Diamondgeog said, I do realize that eating healthy food is not the cause of my problem, and I'm sure I would have been worse off eating low-fiber highly processed foods.

But eating whole foods does not insure that you will maintain a healthy weight.

Radiojane
01-22-2014, 11:30 AM
I've mentioned this on other threads before but it bears repeating.

My parent's generation (my dad would be in his 60's my mom is 53) were raised by people who survived the war and the depression. My grandmother could remember waiting for the train to come from out East with relief goods, and having to share a jar of canned fruit with her 7 siblings. My grandfather had similar stories. Even my more affluent paternal grandparents farmed through lean years and had to feed families of 7 or more.

My mom grew up on a farm, and can remember pork chops the size of the plate and heaps of potatoes. Having lived through deprivation, my grandparents would never, ever have questioned how much their children ate. They were never heavy, because all their lives they worked hard and physically. My mom and my aunts and uncles? they left the farm, took sedentary jobs, ate lower quality food, and ate it in the same outsized quantities they had at home. My dad used to get a mixing bowl of ice cream when he came home from football practice. My grandmother was a nurse, and she genuinely believed that as a "growing boy" this was perfectly fine.

I'm not in any way shape or form blaming the greatest generation for our health woes. But I think obesity in general stems from good intentions: be it cheaper food, not wanting our children to go without, wanting life to be easier than ours was. That coupled with the fact that MY generation has all but lost the ability to cope with delayed gratification (not to mention expects to be rewarded for EVERYTHING we do), and we've painted ourselves into a very unhealthy corner.

Arctic Mama
01-22-2014, 12:16 PM
I'm fat because I have hormonal imbalances, not the least of which is a profound intolerance to dietary carbohydrate in any significant quantity. I also struggle with some boredom eating, but eating unprocessed low carb food solves 90% of the issues that calorie counting and 'healthy' whole grains, fruit, and dairy, did not. I lost a fair bit of weight that way, but it was a constant battle. Cut out the carbs, with the exception of nuts, the occasional berries, dark chocolate, and veggies? Problem (mostly) solved.

So I could be fat because I'm emotional and lack willpower, but I think that's moralizing an inherently endocrinological issue. And the body of research into the mechanics of obesity over the last two centuries is on my side in statistically significant way.

Or maybe that's my weak will justifying? :lol:

pixelllate
01-22-2014, 12:23 PM
Healthy grains are generally considered those that are unprocessed/minimally processed and include pseudo grains. Brown rice, kamut, buckwheat, quinoa, amaranth, millet, rye, oats, etc.

As for bread, when I first started, my rule was only 5 ingredients or less. Then I switched to sprouted grain bread like Ezekiel 5:9 but now I make my own bread.

Oh boy, most of my gains come from those rather than the generic stuff. =S
the smell of those nutty wholesome grains *sigh*

TooWicky
01-22-2014, 12:54 PM
Contributing factors to my being fat was first shiftwork w/rotating shifts which by the way is just agonous, then later life pregnancies, then grief, all over a period of some years. I think I overate a lot out of boredom/sleeplessness. I also ate a lot of convenience/fast foods because I was too tired to cook, and then I engaged in plain old comfort eating because I was saddened about losing close family members within a short period of time. In the back of my mind, I told myself I'd just "lose it later." I was completely ignorant about portion control and even calories, so I remained in a constant state of annoyance about getting more obese, but I still did nothing about it. After my weight gain got way out of hand, I just figured that I would never ever lose it, and that morbid obesity was now my life, so why bother with trying to lose weight.

Honestly, the veil of grief starting to lift was a big catalyst in my deciding to try to lose weight for the first time ever. As I metaphorically "decided to live" after being so sad for so long, I saw how obesity was hampering my life. I finally decided to do the work that taking care of oneself requires, such as consciously eating more healthily, educating oneself about calories and portions, and exhibiting some will power.

diamondgeog
01-22-2014, 01:28 PM
I see many people in this thread saying I am overweight because I overeat. I am not saying that isn't true. Obviously that is a huge reason for most.

But not nearly as many people overeat 30, 40, 50, 100 years ago. I personally feel that there is value in not always seeing yourself as the entire nexus of overeating.

The food environment has radically changed the last 50 years. Major food companies have enlisted phalanx of scientists and advertisers to addict you to your food and create more addictive food than there ever was.

That and the government telling us fat was the number one problem for heart disease not sugar/carbs. This was heavily influenced by food companies then and all the way up to today.

I remember being bombarded by sugary cereal commercials as a child. And if that wasn't bad enough they included toys inside. Should I have known better as a 5 or 6 year old?

I find it very empowering 'standing' up to this putting profits over health. Others might care less. If it doesn't help, fine. Am I blaming others? If you want to call it that, go right ahead. I think of it as being aware of the food environment I live in and being very aware that there are powerful players in society who have chosen to make their profits regardless of the impacts on my health. There are other ways for profits, but that was the path they choose.

And I am going to do everything in my power to make sure they do not succeed with my body, my health, my quality of life, and my future.

PerishTheWeight
01-23-2014, 01:13 AM
For me it's really a combination of factors. Nibbling when I'm bored or watching tv & not really hungry. Stopping more often than I should for fast food when I'm out and about instead of thinking ahead and packing something healthy from home. Being lazy and more sedentary than I should (like doing wii fit or something active instead of sitting on the computer burning no calories!):^:. Not being a lover of exercise, I am also guilty of using any excuse these days to avoid it . Add to that having a wonderful husband who loves me unconditionally. Unfortunately, he sweetly keeps telling me that I look beautiful to him and am not overweight - which truthfully doesn't really help me much in the motivation department, either (then again, I guess it's better than him telling me the alternative :yikes:!). My brain REALLY wants to believe that he is right (despite the fact that I currently live in only yoga pants, as nothing else fits comfortably - and the dress I bought to wear to a wedding last month was a depressing size 16:o!!!).You can also add to that my now being over 50 and in the midst of menopause. Yes, all of those factors definitely contribute. But if I really had to break it down to one thing, I think it would be the fact that I was never a "big" person in my younger years - in fact, in my teen years I was very skinny - looked like a scarecrow actually - and because of that could eat anything, and as much of it I wanted -without any problems at all. So I never really learned to develop much will power or portion control when it came to food. That is where the ladies who have always been on the larger side actually have the advantage over someone like me. But as I got older, my wonderful metabolism started slowing down. Got married and had my kids late in life - mid 30's - and that made another dent in the old metabolism. Stopped working at a job where I was always moving and standing and stayed home to raise and homeschool the kids. That sedentary lifestyle added more weight. Then the pre menopause/menopause years kicked in. More weight added. But not with enough lifestyle changes to counterbalance it. On top of that, add some major stressful events in the past few years and this is what you get. I am now so heavy I actually weigh more now than I did when I was pregnant with my children! I DON'T want to be like this. I know that if I don't get a handle on it now, things will only get worse. Let's face it - people DON'T typically get thinner when they get older! I want to start being more active again. As much as I hate exercise, I do like the way I feel (and look!) afterwards. But right now the joints hurt, I'm always sore, etc. If I can lose at least 2 "bowling balls" worth of weight in the next month or so, then I will hopefully be more motivated to get out there and start working out again. But I do have to seriously learn and make some permanent lifestyle & eating changes. And stick with them! That's why I'm counting on the accountability factor with my Ideal Protein coach to kick me back into gear when I start to slack off if/when I reach the maintenance phase. Hopefully I can do it.

ReillyJ
01-23-2014, 01:36 AM
I (was) fat simply because I LOVE FOOD. No other reason.

carter
01-23-2014, 03:47 AM
Recreational eating, coupled with a bottomless appetite.

LilDazed
01-23-2014, 08:32 AM
Eating even though I wasn't hungry. College definitely had an effect too. Not much running around and calorie burning. Add a surplus of alcohol and....yeeeeeah. But I've definitely cut back on drinking since graduation and am making much healthier food choices.

RideRunRepeat
01-23-2014, 05:49 PM
Using food as an emotional buffer. I hate feeling down so when I do instead of dealing with the problem or my emotions I'll stuff it down with a big serving of really anything I could get my hands on.

I've never really had a problem with specific foods (I mean, I like tasty foods, who doesn't?) but when I'm emotionally binging I will err...used to....overeat on anything...except maybe veggies haha.

Now I love my veggies...but for me the key really is to just eat when I'm hungry and STOP when I'm satisfied.

Today, every time I'm stressed or overwhelmed I learning how to let it out, cry it out, work it out, or sleep it out. No more inner wars muffled by food. I'm learning how to live a lot more honestly with myself.

Frantastic
01-23-2014, 06:08 PM
I am overweight because I am a food addict (specifically sugar and carbs) and a compulsive overeater; I also love snacking. My eyes are broken as I am very bad at identifying normal quantities and my brain is muddled as I have a difficult time knowing when to stop eating! To eat normally I have to weigh and measure everything! It's a life sentence.

SweetCurves32
01-23-2014, 07:05 PM
I am overweight because I eat too much and move to little. I have a problem with sweets and I am an emotional eater. I know this about myself and I am working on these issues. I know I can overcome them all!

Terra1984
02-09-2014, 11:11 PM
I have a big appetite,
love everything about food - shopping for it, cooking it, eating it, trying new restaurants,
my appetite becomes even bigger if I eat too many carbs and too little fat and protein,
I have couch potato tendencies.

Im the same way

bottomless appetite

Thats me also