Weight Loss Support - Why even try?




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MindiV
01-03-2014, 05:45 AM
For a year now - A YEAR - I've been trying to lose the last of my baby weight by calorie counting and working out. The same way I lost more than 80 pounds originally. It has now actually been more than a year since I lost any weight. I've tried varying my calories, from as high as 1,850 a day to as low as 1,200 a day and have settled on 1,550 per day (what I used to lose last time). Nothing. In fact I'm only slowly gaining weight for no reason. The week after Christmas I missed a birth control pill, stayed almost perfectly on plan and GAINED 8 pounds. I thought that had gone away (water weight, sodium, etc) but nope, as of this morning it's back.

I'm sitting here getting ready to go to the gym and asking myself why I bother doing all this - eating right and working out 5 days a week (cardio and strength training) - when NOTHING is doing any good at all. I just want to cry. :(:(:(


SparklyBunny
01-03-2014, 05:58 AM
Have you tried changing the macronutrient ratio of your diet? Same calories, but different types of foods. How much protein do you get each day, how much carbs and how much fat? Also, do you only pay attention to the weight or do you know if there have been changes in your body composition?

MindiV
01-03-2014, 06:56 AM
The only body composition changes have been it getting bigger and fattier. I track protein, calcium, etc., on MyFitnessPal. I'm trying to get back into eating more fresh foods and less processed (i.e. easy and quick with a baby) junk, but it's hard when I have a husband who refuses to do the same.


kaplods
01-03-2014, 07:19 AM
It took me about 7 years to lose about 110 lbs, then I gained about 35 lbs (still mostly on plan) and then lost about 20. In the last year or so, I've lost nothingv(still mostly on plan..

I keep at it, because the alternative is gaining a whole heckuva lot more, and hella fast too. Even if I'm gaining, I know I'd be gaining more and faster if I gave up.

That being said, I'd suggest you get a checkup to rule out a blood sugar or other endocrine issue, which could account for the metabolic slowing.

My hubby also refuses to eat the way I'd like him to, but that is only as difficult as I want to make it.

I started making healthier meals and allowed him to eat them or fend for himself. Mostly, he chooses to fend for himself.

In the pantry, all his "junk" and other foods I shouldn't eat, go into an opaque plastic bin on the pantry shelf (so I don't see it when I go in there for my food).

It isn't mindlessly easy, but it's a whole lot easier than I thought it was going to be.

GlamourGirl827
01-03-2014, 07:25 AM
Hi!! Losing baby weight, especially that last bit is hard. In my personal experience, after having kids, your body changes and weight loss is more challenging. I just had baby #3 (just as in 5 months ago!) and its been harder this time than before.

I struggled to get the weight off after my first son, but I was able to get it off after my second.

First, I found out I have Hashimotos, an autoimmune thyroid diseae. Going on thyroid medication, for me, was more about energy. I was always tired, like deathly tired, and people would just say "oh you have kids!" but it was more than mommy tired, as I was sleeping & eating well...My workouts were poor because I was always so tired. And I sat around a lot!

If you dont have any other symptoms, or any reasons to get a check up, then I would recommend changing up your workout. When I started running, those last pounds came off quite easily for me. It took a few months to get to the point were I was running several miles a morning, so I didnt see results while I was jog/walking at first.

You dont have to become a runner, but seriously redoing your workout routine can help get through plateus (spelling?? lol) If you are going to the gym and doing the same workout you always do, then try something new with a higher intensity..running was mine and I will say I did not notice a difference until I started running outside, for *me* the treadmill doesnt cut it, maybe I'm afraid to push the speed on there because I'll fall lol..but there are other high intensity workouts...maybe some people have some ideas...kickboxing? anyway in my experience the "secret" to getting of that last bit of weight was in my workouts not my diet. Others might disagree, but that s what worked for me.

GlamourGirl827
01-03-2014, 07:34 AM
It took me about 7 years to lose about 110 lbs, then I gained about 35 lbs (still mostly on plan) and then lost about 20. In the last year or so, I've lost nothingv(still mostly on plan..

I keep at it, because the alternative is gaining a whole heckuva lot more, and hella fast too. Even if I'm gaining, I know I'd be gaining more and faster if I gave up.

That being said, I'd suggest you get a checkup to rule out a blood sugar or other endocrine issue, which could account for the metabolic slowing.

Kaplods, I didnt see this until my post posted. We must have been writing at the same time! But this is very true for me also. Giving up would mean regaining at high velocity! At least keeping at it means when a gain happens its slower and smaller.
And I second getting any medical reasons ruled out :)

Nikstixy
01-03-2014, 07:50 AM
I totally get how you feel. Ive been trying for years and promising myself that by my next year ill be thinner. im finally now starting to believe that ill actually achieving this hope, even though its just january 3rd! :)

sometimes we feel hopeless. it can suck to feel that way, but you just gotta know that your doing the right thing! becoming fit isnt just for you- being healthy is doing a duty as a mum and wife, you know showing healthy examples to your kid(s) and husband. even if your frustrated about not achieving that goal on the scale, your still treating your body right. gotta feel proud about that!


stay strong!

nikstix

SparklyBunny
01-03-2014, 08:00 AM
The only body composition changes have been it getting bigger and fattier. I track protein, calcium, etc., on MyFitnessPal. I'm trying to get back into eating more fresh foods and less processed (i.e. easy and quick with a baby) junk, but it's hard when I have a husband who refuses to do the same.

It may be hard, but since you're in the range of normal body weight and probably also normal body fat, it's going to require extra effort to get what you want.

I don't know all the ways having a child will affect your hormones, but I know that it does do something, which again will make things harder. Simply counting calories will get you to a point, but if you desire to have a specific kind of body composition, you'll have to be more specific with your exercise and diet routines. More is not always better with exercise and less is not always better with calories. What you do, when and how much and what you eat and when and how much does affect the results.

seagirl
01-03-2014, 08:01 AM
I would go to the doctor for a thyroid test and to ask them about what might be happening.

zoesmom
01-03-2014, 08:19 AM
The truth is, our bodies become exceptionally efficent at utilizing what we have in relation to what we do. In addition to that, as we age, add or lose pounds, or grew/shrink (it CAN happen!) our BMR changes. That change can be the difference between pounds lost, gained, or maintained. Since you say you already count calories, check out what your BMR is. To lose weight, you need to subtract 500-1000 calories from your maintainence BMR (most people would fall in the 500 range, FWIW). You simply might not be eating enough. Or, too much. For instance, my BMR is 1704. My doctor had at one time, put me on a "low" calorie diet of 1800. I lost at first (hello water weight!), but started gaining after a few weeks. I was eating MORE calories than my BMR, which put me in a gain.

Below is a list I wrote myself a while back after a ton of research when I hit a 4 month stall. It helped, a lot. Actually, kinda refreshing to dig it up again. Hang in there. You can do this.

1) Shake things up. Instead of exercising only 30 minutes, exercise for 45. Instead of doing cardio every day, add in strength training every other day. Change what time of day you work out, divide it into two session, or completely change the type of workoutyou are doing. Change the intensity, your body adjusts to the level you are currently at so you have to shock it back into cooperation. Challenge yourself and you will soon see the plateau, and the pounds, wave good bye.

2) Change your eating habits. If you are eating 3 meals a day, split them up into smaller meals, and eat 5 to 6 times a day. Alter the foods you eat, instead of the same yogurt, have an half an apple and a slice of cheese. Add more protein and less carbs to your diet. Never forget to adjust your caloric intake. As you lose weight, you need less calories. Double check you are within your BMR range for your height, weight, activity level, and age.

3) Don't diet. I know, that seems counter productive, but hear me out. Diets are short term and are meant to end. You've heard the cliche of lifestyle change. That means long term. If you change your mentality about it, knowing this is to be forever or as close to, you will find you won't limit yourself from all foods, but learn to incoorporate them into your daily routine. Perhaps, your body just needs a break. Take a week or two off from being so strict, then jump back in the saddle. Relaxing a bit and taking the stress off your mind often times moves you past a stall.

4) Mix up your calories. Instead of tracking per day, track per week. Alter your calorie intake daily to confuse your body. One day, eat 200-300 calories less than what your should, the next day, eat 200-300 more than you should. This zig-zagging pattern, known as calorie shifting, may push you past your stall as your body has to keep guessing how much it is going to get oppossed to how much it has to burn. Just make sure your weekly calorie intake does not exceed your weekly BMR alloted amount for weight loss

5) Track and Record...EVERYTHING. Oftentimes, we get lazy tracking what we eat and what we do. Suddenly, we start eyeballing measurements and think that one spoonful of mashed potates will not have too big an effect on us. But do this repeatedly enough times, and it will have the opposite effect. Even if it is just a few weeks to get you past the plateau, accurately measure, track, and record everything. It is a way to reinforce good behaviors that you already knew but may be slacking on.

EDIT: I agree also with getting any medical reasons ruled out.

onthedietagain
01-04-2014, 08:49 AM
Maybe give low carb a try? I can not deal with counting calories and choose to eat low carb, not counting carbs ether. Skip breakfast (black coffee), salad with some protein for lunch, and nice dinner with salmon or chicken and big salad. Some people more sensitive to carbs and must concentrate on limiting them in order to lose weight.

melkhamilton
01-06-2014, 12:57 PM
Have you gone to your doctor? You may have some condition that's holding you back. I'm hypothyroid and I know I COULD NOT lose weight when I wasn't medicated for it.

MindiV
01-06-2014, 02:30 PM
I did recently have my thyroid checked during a full blood panel for another reason. I'm really wondering if I'm not having some hormonal issues at play, and I've actually got an appointment to talk to him this afternoon about all that. Maybe there's something up there, and if not, then it's time for MAJOR tweaking of the diet.

geoblewis
01-06-2014, 02:42 PM
If you don't mind me asking...what exactly is your goal? Is it just a number on the scale? Do you want to wear a certain size? Look a certain way? Feel a certain way?

And what exactly are you doing for exercise? How often and how much time spent at it?

I totally get it about eating processed food for convenience and because that's what hubby likes. But really, the processed food is NOT YOUR FRIEND! But you already knew that.

MindiV
01-06-2014, 02:51 PM
My goal is to get back down to nearly where I was pre-baby: 140. I know at my height that's low, but I liked me at that weight and (then) it wasn't hard to maintain. I was able to eat and be satisfied and felt good about myself. I just want to be able to fit back into some of the pants I can "almost" get back into now (I loved them) and not feel huge in the shirts I can still wear.

Exercise is 35-45 minutes of cardio (elliptical and/or treadmill) and strength training (alternating lower and upper body) 5 days a week, every morning at 5 a.m. Weekends off - but I try to stay as active as possible (and do a ton of housework).

I'm trying really hard to quit with a lot of the processed stuff. More fresh fruits, etc. Like for breakfast this morning I had a bunch of grapes. Snack was a whole wheat pita with cream cheese and honey. Dinner tonight will be tacos, rice, beans and veggies.

IanG
01-06-2014, 03:10 PM
Look, the last few pounds are super-tough and I am testament to that.

I was stuck at 170lbs for months. I found I was eating too much hummus, eliminated that from my diet, started to lose and I an now stuck at 165lbs. And this from a guy who was losing 4lbs a week until I was about 180lbs.

My advice would be to play around with your diet and exercise to get the scale shifting. From my experience, you may have to do this multiple times as you may continue to stall as you get smaller. It is just so hard at the lower weights.

I would suggest you try to exercise longer. An hour of cardio, if you have time, and alternate weight training on different days perhaps with another gym visit (I try to go twice a day). Try exercising at the weekends as well. I joined a second gym to do that. Housework does not count when you are 5'8.5" and 159lbs. At least not like it did when you were 220lbs.

Regarding your diet, cut the fruit and eat veggies instead. And target those carbs. Ditch the pita, reduce the honey. Tacos, rice and beans. Change them. Too many carbs. Try some lean protein instead. Fish, eggs, oats (for breakfast).

That will get the scale moving again. But you may have to keep stepping it up to reach goal. I know I will.

JulesMarion
01-06-2014, 03:39 PM
As you age, your body changes (especially with hormonal changes), and the weight you knew before children may not be what your body settles at. I know my weight plateaued at 180 and wouldn't budge no matter what I did. (Unfortunately I gained it back because of unhealthy eating habits) We are about the same height and I know that at about 180 I was a size 8, and felt healthier than ever. Pre-baby, did you exercise a lot? You may have built up a lot of muscle weight. I'd go by measurements and how you feel, rather than a scale. BMI & weight can be inaccurate, especially if you have been working out a lot and your body has changed.

GlamourGirl827
01-06-2014, 05:48 PM
Look, the last few pounds are super-tough and I am testament to that.

I was stuck at 170lbs for months. I found I was eating too much hummus, eliminated that from my diet, started to lose and I an now stuck at 165lbs. And this from a guy who was losing 4lbs a week until I was about 180lbs.

My advice would be to play around with your diet and exercise to get the scale shifting. From my experience, you may have to do this multiple times as you may continue to stall as you get smaller. It is just so hard at the lower weights.

I would suggest you try to exercise longer. An hour of cardio, if you have time, and alternate weight training on different days perhaps with another gym visit (I try to go twice a day). Try exercising at the weekends as well. I joined a second gym to do that. Housework does not count when you are 5'8.5" and 159lbs. At least not like it did when you were 220lbs.

Regarding your diet, cut the fruit and eat veggies instead. And target those carbs. Ditch the pita, reduce the honey. Tacos, rice and beans. Change them. Too many carbs. Try some lean protein instead. Fish, eggs, oats (for breakfast).

That will get the scale moving again. But you may have to keep stepping it up to reach goal. I know I will.

^yes yes and yes^

kelijpa
01-06-2014, 09:04 PM
Changing things up definitely helps, I was stuck in the 160s up and down for almost the whole year last year, I decided to do c25k and switched out some of the red meat for fish and plant based (avocado a day for awhile) changing the diet and exercise unlocked something, now I'm in the lower end of the 160s and more days in the 150s. Now I feel like I can make my goal weight.

I'm a lot shorter than you, and only shooting for a few pounds less than you are but totally understand how body composition, the size of hips, boobs, etc. can make a big difference in what somebody's scale number should be, or whatever your goal that's going to make you happy.

Be proud of maintaining for a year, make sure you don't have some underlying health condition causing your stall and change things up.

Best of luck to you, don't quit :sunny:

MindiV
01-07-2014, 04:33 PM
I actually visited the doctor yesterday to rule out any physical issues before I started messing with my diet. And because I've been having weird rib cage, back and chest pains when I breathe during workouts (and other random times). Having some tests done to determine why that's going on, though probably not tied to weight loss.

While we await the results of those tests and x-rays, I'm working on keeping my diet 100% clear of any undocumented snacks, and refocusing on logging EVERYTHING I'm eating. Maybe my "here and there" snacks added up to more than I expected. Gonna give this a couple weeks before tackling major diet changes that will cause a lot of stress at a potentially stressful time, health-wise.

Oh, and the doctor said he doesn't want to see me below 150. :/ Still may shoot for 145 to give a cushion. :)

kelijpa
01-07-2014, 05:12 PM
Hi, good you're discussing your pains with your doctor, I was just reading an article in this months Health magazine, it it's called Body Clues You Shouldn't Ignore, you might like reading it.

MindiV
01-16-2014, 05:47 AM
Thyroid is fine. Doctor refuses to believe ANYTHING could be wrong hormonally since I'm on birth control. My back is majorly messed up but that won't cause weight gain.

Past couple of weeks I've been below my calorie range, eating well again, working out and varying my workouts with running. Weigh-in this morning was UP another pound. :(

Guess it's time to do major dietary changes, or cut my calories even more. I don't function well on less than 1,500 calories - blood sugar issues and nausea galore. Gotta do some research.

Lori Bell
01-16-2014, 05:10 PM
Hi Mindi, you might remember me from years past. Your story sounds a lot like me, except I didn't have a baby in the last 2 years!

After my huge weight loss by counting calories I had little problem staying at 140. I got to raise my calories to around 1800 a day to maintain and to be honest, I really didn't believe people when they said they were doing everything right and still not losing weight. Then, little by little, my weight began to creep up. At first I could just cut calories and I would get (almost) back to 140 and then go weeks without a loss despite restricting. I would get frustrated and binge. I would repeat this cycle several times over the next 2 years until I found my way up to 173. None of my pants fit and many of my tops were getting too tight. I tried weight watchers and managed to get off 10 pounds and kept that off during the holidays for the most part.

Sadly the same thing happened with weight watchers though, my weight stalled and after weeks of being perfectly on plan the loss just stopped....SOOOO, I decided to try something new.

At the beginning of January I decided to give up all grains and sugar. I have to say, the first week sucked, but now I feel really great, and the weight is coming off again! I'm not craving bread/sweets and staying within my calories has been very easy. I'm thrilled to find something that is helping the scale to move again!
It's fairly low carb, but I still eat potatoes and/ or some fruit each day and getting in at least 3 serving of "good fat" per day.

I'm giving it a dedicated 3 months trial to find all the benefits of gluten/grain/sugar free and so far I have nothing but good to show for it.

Good luck in what ever you do!

freelancemomma
01-16-2014, 09:47 PM
to be honest, I really didn't believe people when they said they were doing everything right and still not losing weight.

Interesting. I secretly feel that way sometimes. I guess I need a whack on the head?

F.

shcirerf
01-16-2014, 11:10 PM
:hug:

As someone, who actually has medically diagnosed food allergies, it's worth looking into.

We're all different. What works for me, might not for you.

Don't give up! :hug:

Also keep in mind, as we age, our bodies and our needs change as well, and we have to be mindful of those changes and adjust.

diamondgeog
01-17-2014, 09:03 AM
I'm sitting here getting ready to go to the gym and asking myself why I bother doing all this - eating right and working out 5 days a week (cardio and strength training) - when NOTHING is doing any good at all. I just want to cry. :(:(:(

I understand the context here is in relationship to losing the last weight and not to overall well-being, health, quality of life, and longevity. But as someone who didn't eat right and didn't work out to someone who now does: it is transformative to eat better and exercise every day. Every second of every day is better.

Body, mind, energy, clarity, mood. I can't even list the ways it is probably helping you: more energy, better mood, whole body being healthier from the inside out.

That being said I have heard bodies get used to whatever you are doing and max out their efficiency. Which means if you keep doing the same thing your body is not working as hard. So you need to keep changing.