20-Somethings - recognising when I'm full is really hard!




IsobelRose22
01-02-2014, 03:01 AM
So people. I am trying to lose those last few stubborn lbs. One way I am doing this is to try and teach myself to stop eating when I am full. Does anyone else find this a lot harder than you first thought? So far I have tried forcing myself to leave a little bit on the plate and covering the left overs in washing up liquid.

Personally, it means trying to undo 25yrs of being taught that not to clear your plate is rude, or being told that you couldn't have dessert unless you ate everything. At this stage it is more psychological than a physical diet, I am finding that I have more ingrained habits than I thought I did, I feel like I need a bloody therapist to get the last bit of weight off!

It's got me thinking, quite a lot of people I know had similar childhoods and have ended up with similar issues regarding their weight (not all obviously) why do we do this to ourselves? Why not teach kids only to eat until they are full in the first place?

Well there's the rant. :)


pixelllate
01-02-2014, 10:25 AM
Grew up like that as well. Personally, its because my family was from a poor country and to say no to food when it was readily available is super taboo. Let's just say my father killed quite a few of our pet fish by overfeeding. I spoke to a therapist about it - being forced to finish the plate, being unable to do anything (like leave the house) so that eating was the only thing I was "allowed" to do. Many things that have led me to subconsciously want to spend my hours eating away.

I just choose to stop eating when my stomach is no longer growling but I also try not to regularly go for foods that increase my appetite (like many carbs make me super hungry and if I replace those with more Paleo-type foods I get fuller faster).

I just set a calorie amount and buy what I need for the day - sure its more inconvenient, but way less temptation and a lot more manageable compared to a lot of other weight loss methods I've seen.

IsobelRose22
01-02-2014, 11:11 AM
Yes not to finish is a bit taboo in my family as well. Although the reason is that my family has a great appreciation for good food, and as we all know 'good food' is not always the best food. It's always 'go ahead have seconds' or 'lets not waste it' or you just get looked at until you give in. The bizarre thing is that all but my mum and I are slim and have never had weight problems, so they can eat all that food and it not effect them. I have come to realise that I will have to monitor my weight and eating habits for the rest of my life. I do comfort myself with the fact that my insides are in much better condition than theirs! :)


Psychic
01-02-2014, 11:32 AM
I grew up with bad eating habits and I'm still suffering psychologically because of them. When I was younger, my mom would fill my plate and I couldn't leave the table until I ate everything. My family also ate a full plate of junkfood as a "snack" each night. These snacks included multiple portions of chips, cheese, and pepperoni.

The rest of my family is very focused on food as well. As soon as you walk in the house, they expect you to eat. A lot. If you say you're not hungry, they keep bugging you until you give in. To them, it is rude not to eat.

I've been trying to leave behind the "clean-plate club" and eat less and learn to say no, but its very hard with such a food-centric family. Even now, I'll have prepared my plate and there will only be a little left in the pan, so my mom piles it onto my plate. There is no point arguing. She'll just justify it in some way or another.

3LMCM
01-03-2014, 12:10 AM
I don't know if I have a solution but I can definitely relate! Not sure where it started exactly but I'm sure it has to do a lot with my mother's emotional eating habits. Every meal deserved a desert and every feeling had it's corresponding food. To this day I respond to a happy moment with "let's get some ice cream" and a sad moment with mindless over-eating.
Good luck to learning when to stop. It's a challenge but every attempt to change gets your closer to your goal. :hug:

MrsDeenz
01-03-2014, 03:35 AM
I can relate as well. Growing up my mother worked nights and my father was home with us. He cooked dinner but his portion control was insane. (He grew up in a poor country with 4 brothers and sisters and not enough food. I think he's overcompensating now?)

Even now he makes enough food to feed a family of 10 - and it'll be just me and my brother eating. We weren't allowed to leave the table until we finished our plates and most of the time, the end of dinner was spent in tears. I used to finish off my brothers plate so he could get up and since then.. portion control has been a bit of a problem for me. :(

pixelllate
01-03-2014, 11:06 AM
I can relate as well. Growing up my mother worked nights and my father was home with us. He cooked dinner but his portion control was insane. (He grew up in a poor country with 4 brothers and sisters and not enough food. I think he's overcompensating now?)

Even now he makes enough food to feed a family of 10 - and it'll be just me and my brother eating. We weren't allowed to leave the table until we finished our plates and most of the time, the end of dinner was spent in tears. I used to finish off my brothers plate so he could get up and since then.. portion control has been a bit of a problem for me. :(

Overcompensating is the perfect term!!! The whole "must gorge when food is finally available" can really wreck havoc on people who came from hard backgrounds to a life where they finally have easy access to a lot of food.

IsobelRose22
01-03-2014, 02:58 PM
I remember being sat at the table for hours in a battle of wills with my parents. Until I just gave in. Now I cannot seem to break the habit, I finish the plate even if i'm full. It still feels wrong not to finish, and yet it is also wrong to eat after you are full and satisfied.

IsobelRose22
01-03-2014, 03:03 PM
Overcompensating is the perfect term!!! The whole "must gorge when food is finally available" can really wreck havoc on people who came from hard backgrounds to a life where they finally have easy access to a lot of food.

The thing is I don't come from a hard background and neither do my parents. Yet you can still end up with the same mind-set regarding food. You take for granted that food is always there and available, there are no financial restrictions, couple that with a food orientated family and you have a recipe for obesity.

It's terrible that so many of us have these issues with food, but at the same time I am glad it is not just me. I know what I need to do to fix it, I just sometimes need a sympathetic ear who understands. God bless 3FC :carrot:

Munchy
01-06-2014, 04:24 PM
To train myself, I just familiarized myself with appropriate portions: 2oz of pasta, 1/2 cup of rice, 4oz of meat, etc. Then I filled up my plate with non-starchy vegetables.

Now, I like to cook and portion ahead of time. That way I just take out the amount I plan to eat, and there are no leftovers readily available for more helpings.

underanalysis
01-06-2014, 04:33 PM
I have to eat a lot of tiny meals throughout the day. I eat, at minimum, at 10-11AM, 12/1 PM, 3 PM, and then ASAP when I get off work. Sometimes I do more snacking than that even.

I'm American, but a few years back after graduating college, I went through a period of serious poverty where I only got to eat more than once a day if I lucked into someone giving me food. I had about $10/week to spend on groceries.

Since then, I have to be very careful not to ever let myself get too hungry, because if I do it's like my body kicks into panic mode and I start craving a large amount of high fat/calorie foods to stock up. I'm sure my bosses all think I'm weird as **** because I'm eating so many times a day, but losing control of my hunger is the quickest way to lose control of my diet.