Weight Loss News and Current Events - Aspartame: Recommended by Nutritionists But It Piles on the Pounds




Annik
10-24-2013, 02:36 PM
Aspartame: Recommended by Nutritionists But It Can Make You Pile on the Pounds (http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/10/23/aspartame-artificial-sweeteners.aspx?e_cid=20131023Z1_DNL_art_1&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20131023Z1)


I am joining the campaign to stop aspartame dead in its tracks! This stuff is insidious and so encouraged by doctors and diabetes specialists!


nelie
10-24-2013, 03:05 PM
Well I don't think aspartame is recommended by doctors and diabetes specialists, it is more than often sugar is discouraged and people look for alternatives. Also, I'd say Mercola.com shouldn't be considered a source but if you happen to find something from there, I'd look elsewhere to validate as there have been a lot of misinformation and information that has been fabricated on that site.

The NIH site PubMed is a great site for fact checking, here is a good article from 2010 on the subject.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2892765/

This is pretty much in line with other recent research that has come out in the past couple years and one reason I've personally cut out most sweeteners.

CherryQuinn
10-27-2013, 08:37 AM
I drink 3-4 diet pepsi a day and put fake sugar in my coffees or baked goods. I don't gain weight because of it . Lol.


Annik
10-27-2013, 08:59 AM
I drink 3-4 diet pepsi a day and put fake sugar in my coffees or baked goods. I don't gain weight because of it . Lol.

Cherry,

Insight from 'The Doctors' tv show that sheds light on artificial sweeteners as they are found in diet pop.

View this clip (http://www.thedoctorstv.com/videolib/init/7031) then this one. (http://www.thedoctorstv.com/videolib/init/7032)

good luck!

Annik

Annik
10-27-2013, 09:02 AM
Physicians Against Aspartame (http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/salud/esp_salud23n.htm)

Rounding up wisdom from a variety of sources about aspartame and other artificial sweeteners

Consumer reports on Aspartame (http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/salud/esp_salud23.htm#Additional_Information)

Annik
10-27-2013, 09:14 AM
Well I don't think aspartame is recommended by doctors and diabetes specialists, it is more than often sugar is discouraged and people look for alternatives.

In fact, the American and Canadian Diabetes Associations do recommend it.

Monsanto, maker of Nutrasweet, is their very generous funding donor.

There is a nutrasweet label on many CDA cookbooks and the product is mentioned by name in their campaign literature.

Heather
10-27-2013, 09:48 AM
I used artificial sweeteners throughout my weight loss and successfully lost over 100 pounds drinking diet soda, putting splenda in my coffee and eating diet pudding with sweetener. However, I've begun reducing my use of artificial sweeteners, because unlike products like caffeine and wine, which are sometimes found to be good for us and other times found not to be so good, I've never seen a research study that shows that artificial sweeteners are good for our health.

That said, it's difficult for research to pinpoint them as a cause of weight gain in humans. In fact, in the first article linked to on this thread, the statement was made: "research has repeatedly demonstrated that artificial sweeteners actually make you gain equal or more weight than regular sugar." I don't know that any of the studies they cited actually show that. Several of the references were about artificial sweeteners ability to increase hunger, not weight gain. Another looked at the relationship between sweetener use and consumption of sugar (finding different results for men and women). The last article discussed a correlation between consumption of artificial sweeteners and weight gain, but that doesn't demonstrate causality. So I am having trouble taking the rest of the article seriously, especially as it seems to use scare tactics ("think formaldehyde"). That said, I have seen a number of credible studies showing how these sweeteners don't necessarily fool us as well as we think they should, so I do think there's something to that piece of it. It's one of the reasons I've been cutting it from my diet.

So I'm not saying people should or should not use artificial sweeteners. But I am saying that it's difficult to do definitive research in human on and I'm not sure there's good evidence to show that the sweeteners cause weight gain. There may be other reasons not to use it, however.

CherryQuinn
10-27-2013, 10:29 AM
Cherry,

Insight from 'The Doctors' tv show that sheds light on artificial sweeteners as they are found in diet pop.

View this clip (http://www.thedoctorstv.com/videolib/init/7031) then this one. (http://www.thedoctorstv.com/videolib/init/7032)

good luck!

Annik


No thanks I dont need tv doctors lol I dont need dr.Phil or any of the others either. I lose weight justtt fine drinking 0 calorie drinks and I have a clean bill of health.

nelie
10-27-2013, 12:16 PM
In fact, the American and Canadian Diabetes Associations do recommend it.

Monsanto, maker of Nutrasweet, is their very generous funding donor.

There is a nutrasweet label on many CDA cookbooks and the product is mentioned by name in their campaign literature.

I don't know about the CDA but the ADA basically doesn't recommend any sweeteners. They just list details that they are approved by the FDA with no stance for or against.
http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/artificial-sweeteners/

I found a letter as far back as 1999 that there were emails accusing the ADA to be in association with Monsanto and other companies to push artificial sweeteners. Back them, they claimed that as false and as always their stance has been that they recommend using the limits set by the FDA when using artificial sweeteners and have no recommendation for or against the sweeteners, other than following any guidelines set by the FDA.

Now the FDA isn't infallible but that seems like the right stance to take from my point of view.

And this is the Canadian Diabetes Association, their recommendation is actually a bit stronger against artificial sweeteners than the US one. They seem to indicate that you may want to choose sugar over artificial sweeteners.
http://www.diabetes.ca/diabetes-and-you/nutrition/sweeteners/

Annik
10-27-2013, 12:32 PM
Artificial Sweeteners Tied to Obesity and Type 2 Diabetese (http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/artificial-sweeteners-tied-to-obesity-type-2-diabetes-1.1352987)

I stand corrected. I see the ADA and the CDA are now themselves starting to ask questions about aspartame. Good.:

Is Aspartame Really Safer (http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/30/7/e59.full)....

nelie
10-27-2013, 12:47 PM
And again, I'd stress the importance of not relying on someone else's interpretation of studies, PubMed has a lot of great info on all the various studies published around the world that are considered to be peer reviewed. I will say it is a bit of abuse of the scientific method to take 1 study as proof of something as you do need repeatable evidence.

From what I've read, artificial sweeteners can affect some people and not others. One way they may affect people is by actually making them hungrier since artificial sweeteners are non-nutrient. In that case, it may be better to just eat sugar and count your calories.

Annik
10-27-2013, 12:56 PM
2010 Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine: Gain weight by “going diet?” Artificial sweeteners and the neurobiology of sugar cravings (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2892765/)

Brought to you by Pepsi at the Canadian Nurses' Association!

It's Safe! (http://www.infirmiere-canadienne.com/images/pdf/2013/cnj-sep-2013/files/assets/seo/page19.html)

kaplods
10-27-2013, 01:30 PM
Whatdoesthesciencesay.com

I think this blogger does a really good job of evaluating, critiquing and summarizing the research (and the hoaxes, urban legends, and falsehoods that are passed along as "common knowledge).

Some of the information is a bit technical for anyone without advanced high school or entry level college chemistry, statistics and/or research methodology and design, but I think it's still worth wading through anyway.

I only found his blog today looking for some of the research I based my own conclusions upon. He does a much more thorough job of it than I could.


If I had to summarize the aspartame science



1. Caloric intake excess, not sweeteners make you fat.

2. Sweeteners may increase hunger, but that hasn't been established, especially in humans. Sugar also increases hunger.

3. If you control caloric intake, weight will not be impacted.

4. Most of the adverse affects of aspartame are actually related to folate deficiency and folate metabolism.

What that means is that if you are folate deficient, aspartame will make it worse. The worst (and proven) symptoms associated with aspartame are actually a result of the folate deficiency. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables (or a folic acid supplement) will solve the problem.

Some people have sensitivities to folates and/or the amino acid phenylalanine. If aspartame causes a person adverse symptoms, so will other foods containing the folates and/or amino acid, even "healthy" foods like fruits, vegetables, and proteins) containing those substances.



#4 really breaks down even further.


If you have aspartame-triggered symptoms, eat more fruits and vegetables or take a folic acid supplement.

If symptoms improve or disappear, you probably had a folate deficiency.

If symptoms worsen, you may have a sensitivity to folates. You will have to avoid aspartame AND the fruits and vegetables that also trigger symptoms.


Plenylalanine sensitivity is harder to address, because it's an essential amino acid, and avoiding phenylalanine is difficult, unpleasant, and generally not a good idea unless absolutely necessary. Essentially such a diet is often describes as "if it tastes good, you can't have it," and the list of what you can't eat will be much longer than that of what you can.

nelie
10-27-2013, 03:03 PM
That is interesting Kaplods. I just personally try to steer away from most sweeteners, artificial or otherwise. Stevia seems to be a fan of many people but although stevia has been used for centuries, it hasn't been used in the refined way that we use it. I have a major concern about agave so I stopped using it. Proceed with caution is my overall belief.

Annik
10-27-2013, 03:44 PM
Nelie,

Going back to Mercola's article at the beginning. His advice is that we try to wean ourselves from our love of sweets.

There is wisdom in that.

Annik

Sweet Tea Sweetie
12-21-2013, 10:12 PM
I avoid aspartame,but sometimes I drink orange stevia pop.I was talking to a great aunt and she said she used to constantly drink diet pop,but stopped and switched to regular because it just made her crave sweet stuff.I read in a magazine a few months ago that some studies linking obesity to artificial sweetners are flawed because they only study people who were overweight before they started drinking diet soda,or the people drinking it reward themselves with sweets afterwards.

LuvMyMr
12-23-2013, 12:06 PM
My personal experience: artificial sweeteners make me crave real sugar. I can eat one stick of sugar free gum and will have to literally fight the urge to eat a cake. Yes. I don't like them.

yoyoma
01-12-2014, 12:16 PM
I have heard speculation along the lines that artificial sweeteners jump start the insulin response but that there is no glucose in the blood from the artificial sweeteners and as a result it somehow backfires and results in insulin resistance. I have changed from aspartame and splenda to stevia, but presumably even stevia would have this same drawback. I have tried at various times to cut back on my sweetener, but this is one habit I have not been able to kick. I may need to make it a higher priority, but I can certainly succeed in weight loss using 0-cal sweeteners as a crutch.

kaplods
01-12-2014, 01:28 PM
The "sweet tooth" is hardwired into us and all other frugivorous (fruit eating) creatures, which makes it very difficult to quell or modify our preference for sweets.

Eliminating sweets can eliminate or reduce cravings, but they'll usually rebound the moment you break your sweet fast. One bite of cake, or sometimes even sweet fruit, and you're right back were you started or worse.

That's my personal dilemma. I do great until that "one bite won't hurt me," moment. And it's not even cake that does me in, I'm too vigilant for that.

What pulls me back into the sugar trap is the sugar hidden in savory foods, sometimes even in foods that are low-carb overall, but have a sweet component, such as meat with a thin glaze or marinade. Barbecued ribs, for example are a major trigger food for me, even if the sauce is served on the side and I use it sparingly.

David Kessler's book, The End of Overeating, helped me understand my physiological addiction to the swwet/salty/fatty flavor combination, but doing so hasn't lessened the powerful hold the addiction has on my willpower.

I'm a drug addict living in a world and culture where my drug is common and pushed on everyone almost from the time we're born. That we're all born with a genetic potential for the addiction, doesn't make it any easier.

And yet we're told to "suck it up," and expected to not only watch everyone else indulge, we're expected indulge ourselves "in moderation."

For many of us, moderation just isn't possible, but abstinence is not jusy culturally expected, it's virtually mandated. If you don't participate in the group "high" you're often ostracized as a spoil sport.

Imagine giving up heroin in such an environment - if the drug were cheap, omnipresent, and use was not only accepted, but expected.

Artificial sweeteners are my methadone. I am trying to reduce my dependence on addictive sweetness by using artificial sweeteners and gradually reducing the level of sweetness in my food, but I'm very prone to relapse, especially when I feel socially pressured.

I'm not absolving myself of personal responsibility, just acknowledging me weakness in that area. I tend to isolate myself as much as possible, which probably isn't all that healthy - but all my friends and family (even my husband to some degree) are active and frequent users.

In the case of sugar addiction, avoiding the drug culture just isn't remotely possible. Even finding others who acknowledge the addictive potential of sugar is difficult.

As a culture, we sympathize with the difficulty of breaking addiction, even with even with socially accepted habits like caffeine, nicotine, and overspending, but carb and sugar addicts are pressured into using while being told to "suck it up, and use moderation."

Sis
04-04-2014, 08:08 PM
The only thing I can add here is that I was experiencing severe migraines that would literally put me in bed and make me so sick. I was actually on prescription meds for migraines when I ran across an article saying that there was a connection between aparteme and migraines. I thought, ok lets see. I totally stopped eating/drinking anything with it in it. I have not had any migraines since. That's been a few years now. Just some food for thought......

cleanslate
04-05-2014, 12:03 AM
I enjoyed reading all the comments on artificial sweeteners.
I have been trying to do some research on a number of things, including artificial sweeteners all the way to which omega 3 is a good one for me to take. It has been a bit overwhelming trying to figure out which supplements I need.
I haven't figured out how to follow a thread, I thought I read that one day but have forgotten where I saw it. So if anyone responds I do hope I find this topic again.
I know stevia is also processed, I just thought since it was plant derived it was not as bad as the others.
I hope to learn more about how artificial sweeteners affect our insulin response.
Of all the artificial sweeteners out there I try to find products with stevia...example: my flavored protein powder.
I had started out Feb 26, 2014 on a program similar to Ideal Protein, only much more limited products and horrible taste for most of it, not to mention the huge cost. So I have been trying to find my own protein powders and supplements.
When I use up the current supplements that came with this plan, one of the items I will switch to will be chromium picolinate ..... unless there is a better version I am not aware of....to help control the blood sugar cravings thing.

I used to eat sugar several times a day before Feb 26.
I sure do understand the social part of eating, before I never really thought about it. It doesn't matter where I go there is always someone pushing sugary foods at me, I have to just say I am full, or maybe later, and try to change the subject. It certainly isn't easy, but it is worth it.
I don't know if I will ever be able to have a slice of my homemade pie, or other occasional desserts. I am not anywhere near that point so I don't know if it will trigger a major sugar craving, cave-in or binge.
I just keep telling myself that the way I am currently eating might be the way I have to eat for the rest of my life and I will handle it the best way I can.

cleanslate
04-05-2014, 12:06 AM
I forgot to add that I don't drink diet pops, never really drank much pop before either, mostly water, the occasional powder (chemical flavored) iced tea.
I also have only eaten out 3 times since I started this new way of eating. I have been trying to eat at home as much as possible, or take food with me if I think I won't be home in time.

Elladorine
04-05-2014, 08:04 PM
The only thing I can add here is that I was experiencing severe migraines that would literally put me in bed and make me so sick. I was actually on prescription meds for migraines when I ran across an article saying that there was a connection between aparteme and migraines. I thought, ok lets see. I totally stopped eating/drinking anything with it in it. I have not had any migraines since. That's been a few years now. Just some food for thought......
I went through something similar back around 2008. It got so bad that I'd easily spend a week in bed, unable to function. After I made the connection I remembered my father had similar issues with from eating low-calorie mints! I read all labels now and haven't had any migraines since.

I don't seem to have any reaction to any other non-nutritive sweeteners, and am losing weight just fine while occasionally having soda sweetened with either sucralose or stevia. I much prefer that over the roller-coaster that regular soda does to my blood sugar (I'm a former diabetic).

GlamourGirl827
04-07-2014, 05:59 PM
The "sweet tooth" is hardwired into us and all other frugivorous (fruit eating) creatures, which makes it very difficult to quell or modify our preference for sweets.

Eliminating sweets can eliminate or reduce cravings, but they'll usually rebound the moment you break your sweet fast. One bite of cake, or sometimes even sweet fruit, and you're right back were you started or worse.

That's my personal dilemma. I do great until that "one bite won't hurt me," moment. And it's not even cake that does me in, I'm too vigilant for that.

What pulls me back into the sugar trap is the sugar hidden in savory foods, sometimes even in foods that are low-carb overall, but have a sweet component, such as meat with a thin glaze or marinade. Barbecued ribs, for example are a major trigger food for me, even if the sauce is served on the side and I use it sparingly.

David Kessler's book, The End of Overeating, helped me understand my physiological addiction to the swwet/salty/fatty flavor combination, but doing so hasn't lessened the powerful hold the addiction has on my willpower.

I'm a drug addict living in a world and culture where my drug is common and pushed on everyone almost from the time we're born. That we're all born with a genetic potential for the addiction, doesn't make it any easier.

And yet we're told to "suck it up," and expected to not only watch everyone else indulge, we're expected indulge ourselves "in moderation."

For many of us, moderation just isn't possible, but abstinence is not jusy culturally expected, it's virtually mandated. If you don't participate in the group "high" you're often ostracized as a spoil sport.

Imagine giving up heroin in such an environment - if the drug were cheap, omnipresent, and use was not only accepted, but expected.

Artificial sweeteners are my methadone. I am trying to reduce my dependence on addictive sweetness by using artificial sweeteners and gradually reducing the level of sweetness in my food, but I'm very prone to relapse, especially when I feel socially pressured.

I'm not absolving myself of personal responsibility, just acknowledging me weakness in that area. I tend to isolate myself as much as possible, which probably isn't all that healthy - but all my friends and family (even my husband to some degree) are active and frequent users.

In the case of sugar addiction, avoiding the drug culture just isn't remotely possible. Even finding others who acknowledge the addictive potential of sugar is difficult.

As a culture, we sympathize with the difficulty of breaking addiction, even with even with socially accepted habits like caffeine, nicotine, and overspending, but carb and sugar addicts are pressured into using while being told to "suck it up, and use moderation."

I loved this whole post. I bolded the parts that I really really really felt rang true, but the whole post is truth. I deal with this in real life. My husband acknowledges sugar's addictive properties, but no one else I know does. When I avoid it, others think I'm obsessed. Even on 3FC some threads have gone the way of "in moderation" is the best way, that somehow abstaining is not good for a dieter mentally or not sustainable over the long haul. But tell an alcoholic that they can and should consume alcohol in moderation, and you will hear a very different response. We have accepted culturally that some people cannot drink in moderation, so why do we not support that with sugar and/or carbs?

Annik
04-09-2014, 06:47 PM
Someone recently shared insights when commenting on an article, Are You An Abstainer or a Moderater? ('Are you An Abstainer or a Moderator?')

With some foods, I am like an alcoholic. I have to be an Abstainer or I just start sliding right down the slippery slope to defeat. To keep the 'management issue' manageable, I try not to think of having to do without the food forever. Instead, I just work at avoiding 'the first bite.' (Learned from my friend who is an alcoholic...instead of focusing on what he says is the weariness of a lifetime without booze, he just works at avoiding the first sip. He says it doesn't seem so daunting. Avoiding one little sip is easier than dealing with 'never'!)

I know what some of my red light foods are. If there is a situation where I'll have to face them and I can't be confident of my capacity to self manage, I completely avoid those situations.

The article is interesting!

Your comments about sugars/carbs are spot on!

BettyBooty
04-10-2014, 02:34 PM
I simply do not like any artificial sweeteners because every last one tastes bitter to me. Aspertame, sucralose, stevia - all are completely disgusting to me. My husband uses sweetener in his coffee, and so do my parents, and they are all doing pretty well losing weight, especially my dad and he consumes the most artificial sweetener of us all. I think he probably needs it the same way kaplods described.

Kscott
04-22-2014, 05:59 PM
I drink 3-4 diet pepsi a day and put fake sugar in my coffees or baked goods. I don't gain weight because of it . Lol.

I have read other articles about non calorie sweeteners and do agree that your brain puts out the sugar alert, but I don't agree that using sweetners makes one eat more.

I have been drinking diet beverages for decades along with using sweetners in coffee, tea, etc. and have never had any ill effect from them.

In fact while I have a few pounds to lose i really can't imagine what I would weigh if I didn't use them. A 480 calorie 42 oz. coca a cola makes no sense to me when you can get the same for zero calories.

pixelllate
04-24-2014, 03:38 PM
David Kessler's book, The End of Overeating, helped me understand my physiological addiction to the swwet/salty/fatty flavor combination, but doing so hasn't lessened the powerful hold the addiction has on my willpower.

You just summed up Panda Express Orange Chicken and McDonald's sweet/sour sauce that you stick on McNuggets right there.


Hm, I love my sweets sugar, but I am actually more bread-grain/blood sugar spike prone rather than the sugar from a cake. However, me being prone to eating and eating bread isn't really just due to some physical addiction - like heroine or something. Its really more a combination of enjoying the experience and being a creature of habit. Its not so strong of a pull where I feel some sort of compulsive itch for my next fix, but instead that desire to do a mindless routine-something that gives me easy pleasure. Have not had any apparent issues yet with aspartame either. I have never felt the pull of a hard drug, like meth or something, but I imagine that it is likely stronger than my glee of coming home to a good hunk of grainy, hearty whole wheat bread and 750gram jar of Nutella - as pleasurable as it is, for me anyways, I know that I don't feel like...a wretched physical pain at the thought of not getting my fix after a few weeks of just being clean and even when I do have a treat, I enjoy it/can feel that blood sugar spike, but its not like...a horrific clench of fists desire.

misspixie
09-14-2014, 11:38 PM
I think that there's a huge amount of hidden sugars out there, that pretty much everything that one eats if processed in some way has sugar in it. It creates the expectation of sweetness in a sense -- if everything you've eaten in the past (aka pre-diet) or your "usual" diet is sweet, then that's what you're accustomed to and that's what you'll seek out.
Artificial sweetners are around to replace the sugar in food with a calorie free substitute. The problem is that you might not have the calories but you still have recreated that expectation of sweetness. You haven't adjusted your diet to be less sweet, you've adapted your diet to be just as sweet with fewer calories.
So, when you go off plan or off diet, you're still seeking out the sweetness. And most likely overeating too as you're off plan. Piling on the calories and piling on the pounds because you're still eating the same sweet stuff.
PLUS I really think that artificial sweetners result in weight gain not because they're artificial and not because they're biochemically reacting in your body in an odd way,, but because people give themselves permission to overeat because they have fewer calories in their aspartame/nutrasweet/splenda drink. This is in people who aren't dieting. I think that alot of people say OK I had a diet coke with my Big Mac, so I have 'room" for a Krisy Kreme on the way home. Result -- artificial sweetners equal weight gain.Nothing biochemical but definitely psychological.

Nishna
09-17-2014, 11:11 PM
There was something in the news today about artificial sweeteners having the exact opposite effect of what they were designed for. They increase blood sugar rather than lower it. I believe it had something to do with the sweetener changing the bacteria in the gut.

This site won't let me post a link but if you type: artificial sweeteners news into google you will get the results posted today.

misspixie
09-18-2014, 12:13 PM
Changed my mind! See my latest thread. No more sugar free for me!