PCOS/Insulin Resistance Support - Metformin Dosage?




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levoguette
08-05-2013, 01:48 AM
My doctor recently told me that she believes I have PCOS/Inulin Resistance and that she recommends being put on Metformin for it.

My blood tests show that my insulin levels are high, but it seems that the rest or most of my blood sugar levels are in the normal range.
Has anyone with similar blood test results been put on Metformin? What's your dose?
My doctor mentioned that if I am placed on it, I /must/ eat if not I could pass out which has me pretty worried.
Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.


MauiKai
08-05-2013, 08:35 AM
The same thing was suggested to me as well. I was told I have "mild pcos" and that birth control would be the first line of treatment. I refused immediately because I am not comfortable with the idea of all those hormones. Then she suggested that we could try Metformin instead since I nixed the BC. I've not tried it yet, but I am thinking about it...TMI mostly because irregular periods are driving me a bit batty. As you say, I was concerned about the need to be diligent to not allow my BS to drop too low, since mine is already very normal. That is somewhat daunting for me to consider. One thing she did say, was that metformin can cause you to lose weight. I'm not sure if that is true, but at least ONE good thing could come of it. I'm interested in further replies here from others who are treating PCOS with metformin.

http://women.webmd.com/metformin-glucophage-for-polycystic-ovary-syndrome

ETA: Quick internet research seems to turn up 500mg as the most common starting dosage.

Rana
08-07-2013, 10:25 AM
The reason you should eat is because Metformin is a drug to lower your blood sugar levels. Diabetics also use it.

If your blood sugar levels get too low, you become lethargic and tired, and you don't think straight. People with low blood sugar have even passed out.

So, yes, you should eat.

Additionally, Metformin can take a month or so for your body to get used to it and chances are, taking it with food will probably make you feel better.

Give it a go and if it doesn't work, stop it. It doesn't have to be something you take forever.

Or, if you decide not to take it, then you should consider how to bring your insulin levels down -- whether it's through exercise or diet. This medication may not be a magic pill.


levoguette
08-07-2013, 05:40 PM
My doctor told me I'll very likely be put on Metformin and BC to fix my symptoms, so I guess we'll see how that goes.
MauiKai, I have also heard that Metformin will help losing weight, but that it really is only helping you by reducing the Insulin Resistance and making it more like the normal person's so you would lose weight at the rate of someone who does not have IR, but you have to keep up with diet and exercise to really see any results, like Rana said it's not a magic pill.

I've been eating at a "normal" schedule throughout the summer (3 meals a day with small snacks if needed), but with my college classes starting again soon and with how hectic my schedule can become, that's where eating on a set 'schedule' becomes one my biggest concerns.
Sometimes I'm so busy that I don't find the time to sit down and eat while I am there or may forget to because I'm so focused on working, in addition to there being a no food rule in most rooms. How embarrassing would it be to pass out in the middle of class...! That would be horrifying for me.

TamTam
08-07-2013, 07:22 PM
I am on the 500 mg of Metformin once a day. I eat every 3 hours. Went to the diabetes class, met with the nurse and then the dietician, she gave me a diet to follow and I have FINALLY taken it seriously and am down about 6 pounds in 3 weeks. Hubby is on 3 different types of diabetes meds, he also eats every 3 hours, we have our alarm set on our cell phones to remind us it's time to eat, it's not that critical for me, but if he does not his blood sugar drops very fast.

Wannabehealthy
08-14-2013, 11:37 AM
I do not have PCOS but I am diabetic and have been taking Metformin since 2008. I have never had an episode of low blood sugar. Metformin does not lower blood sugar, per se.

It lowers the amount of glucose absorbed from food.
It lowers the amount of glucose produced by the liver.
It increases the body’s response to insulin, and by that, I mean insulin produced by the body, not injected insulin.

There are other diabetic meds which do actually lower blood sugar and those are the ones that you have to be really careful with.

I don't know what Metformin does for PCOS, but don't be afraid to try it fearing a dangerous blood sugar drop. It is a very inexpensive drug and has few side effects.

Good luck to all of you!