Weight Loss Support - Sleep and weight loss?




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Arrwillia
07-28-2013, 02:22 AM
I keep reading that sleep is important to weight loss. Has anyone noticed a difference on the scales when they got more/better sleep?

I'm currently flying solo with 4 kids while hubby is overseas. With it being summer vacation our schedule is all out of whack. Even if the kids go to bed at a somewhat reasonable hour I've been struggling with insomnia. School starts in 3 wks for all of us (I'm a full time student) so I'm working hard to get us back on a normal schedule but I am so. tired. all the time. I'm sticking to my calorie goals though and running 4x/wk. Tonight I ran 6 miles in 68 mins. I've steadily increased my pace, finally broke 10 min mile consistently this week. :carrot: But yeah, I'm exhausted. I also have all the housework to do, plus I push mow our 1.3 acre yard once a week (4 hrs, usually do 1/2 one day and 1/2 the next). The scales are holding steady, I've lost 20 but have been stuck for the past 2 wks, though it is TOM so maybe I'll see a big loss next week. Do you think getting on a regular consistent schedule with 8 hrs of sleep will help?

I can't wait until hubby gets home this fall and I get some real rest :dizzy:


snowlilly
07-28-2013, 02:39 AM
I keep reading about that as well, everywhere. Apparently, quite a few hormone levels that are responsible for weight loss and hunger control have increased levels during sleep (including the growth hormone - responsible for cell regeneration). Sleep is particularly helpful if you exercise/are active, because that is the time that you give your body for regeneration and rest.

I was also reading in an article that the cortisol levels decrease during sleep and that having a low level of cortisol helps with weight loss. " Higher levels of cortisol lead to a lower metabolism. Breaking protein down into glucose is stimulated by cortisol. If you have too much glucose in your body, it will get stored as fat. On top of this, cortisol interferes with your body’s ability to build muscle mass. If you are trying to lose weight, you want to make sure that you have low cortisol levels in your blood. Getting enough sleep helps you do just that."

The sensation of hunger and fulness we have during the day is also tied to some hormones that are active during sleep and help keep hunger in check.

On top of that, you know about the Intermittent Fasting diet I assume. If you get a good night sleep, you don't even have to worry about counting hours of hunger, the IF will happen without you even knowing it.

I can't link the article I read because of my low post count, but I summed it up a little and you can read more interesting stuff if you google "weight loss and sleep". Hope this helps :D

ChubbyMum
07-28-2013, 07:11 AM
I've had two nights broken sleep with my 7 month old being sick and I've has to fight REALLY hard to resist constant cravings whereas the days after he sleeps solidly 7-7 I find I have a 'natural' will power LOL sleep seems to be really playing a part for me!


GlamourGirl827
07-28-2013, 07:46 AM
I had to do a paper last year on a study about this. It actually followed teenagers and their sleep patterns and the relationship to their eating habits. It did show that those that slept less were more likely to eat more. Very interesting.

Also there have been studies regarding shift work or over night workers and body weight. But even outsife of official studies, I've seen in my own experience as a nurse that over night staff are nearly always over weight and many of them sight difficultly losing weight. I've worked the overnights for extended periods myself and it was very difficult to not gain weight, forget losing weight. This was greatly impacted by being up all night and eating some nights and other times trying to be up during the day on days off...
As someone said there are theories that hormone levels are effected by sleep deprivation. The study I did the paper on referred to another study that showed that sleep effects leptins levels which in turn effect appetite etc.

With a new baby almost here I worry about trying to lose weight while sleep deprived. It may not just be about sticking to plan regardless of sleep deprivation, it may be that lack of sleep decreases weightloss over all. I have read enough to say this is always true, but it seems tha this is what is being discovered from what I have read.

Wannabeskinny
07-28-2013, 10:00 AM
I keep reading that sleep is important to weight loss. Has anyone noticed a difference on the scales when they got more/better sleep?

I'm currently flying solo with 4 kids while hubby is overseas. With it being summer vacation our schedule is all out of whack. Even if the kids go to bed at a somewhat reasonable hour I've been struggling with insomnia. School starts in 3 wks for all of us (I'm a full time student) so I'm working hard to get us back on a normal schedule but I am so. tired. all the time. I'm sticking to my calorie goals though and running 4x/wk. Tonight I ran 6 miles in 68 mins. I've steadily increased my pace, finally broke 10 min mile consistently this week. :carrot: But yeah, I'm exhausted. I also have all the housework to do, plus I push mow our 1.3 acre yard once a week (4 hrs, usually do 1/2 one day and 1/2 the next). The scales are holding steady, I've lost 20 but have been stuck for the past 2 wks, though it is TOM so maybe I'll see a big loss next week. Do you think getting on a regular consistent schedule with 8 hrs of sleep will help?

I can't wait until hubby gets home this fall and I get some real rest :dizzy:

That IS tough!! I only have one 2yr old but I can tell you that things can get pretty insane around here. The only thing that keeps us from losing our minds is an iron-clad schedule. Bed time is non negotiable, as is play time, lunch, naps etc. I stick to it like my life depends on it. If your kids are a bit older can you enlist their help in household chores?

What I imagine to be difficult in a situation with 4 kids is having to constantly repeat yourself. "I told you to put your shoes away" is a fun thing to say 37 times isn't it? In my classroom the first thing I drill into my students is to never make me say anything twice. It works because I use charts charts charts! You can make a chart for each child according to what they are capable of accomplishing according to their age. I don't know how old your kids are but I know a 7yr old can somewhat make their bed, brush their teeth, put their toys away, help unload the dishwasher, etc. List all those chores and each chore completed gets a little sticker. If they earn all their stickers by the end of the day then they can get a prize such as extra time at the park, or a playdate, or they get to choose a program to watch or whatever. It makes it fun and gives them incentive.

If your kids are too young for this then I suggest you create your own reward system and give yourself stickers and prizes for surviving your day :dizzy: perhaps reward yourself with a dirty martini if you can get all the kiddos to bed by 8pm.

freelancemomma
07-28-2013, 11:15 AM
I've never noticed sleep affecting my weight loss one way or another, but I attended a lecture by an internationally renowned obesity researcher who found that sleeping either less than 6 hours or MORE than 9 hours interferes with weight loss because it dysregulates the hormones involved in appetite control.

F.

Wannabeskinny
07-28-2013, 02:12 PM
Oh and yes I have noticed a significant weight gain when not getting proper sleep. I sleep 6-8 hrs every night and have learned to do that by eliminating caffeine past 9am, light yoga before bed and eating less at night. If I eat a lot at night or too late at night I have trouble going to sleep.

kaplods
07-28-2013, 03:44 PM
When I was diagnosed with sleep apnea, my pulmonologist (the sleep study doctor) told me that using the cpap would probably cause some weight loss, even if I didn't change anything else.

I thought he was absolutely NUTS, as I've never lost weight without trying. At the time I didn't have a home scale and was certainly not trying. At my next doctor's appointment I had lost 20 lbs without trying.

For me, sleep is even more important for my other health issues than for the weight. Sleep deprivation is my greatest flare trigger for my fibromyalgia and autoimmune disease flares (many fibromyalgia doctors believe fibromyalgia may actually be primarily a sleep disorder).

If you chronically deprive rats of sleep, they die of immune dysfunction. When my neurologist told me that, it was something I already knew (from college and graduate school), but hadn't ever thought of in terms of my own symptoms.

My experience isn't typical. I endured decades of chronic sleep deprivation (working swing and double shifts, working my way through college and graduate school and working multiple jobs) before I noticed any seriously negative effects (or tied them to sleep when I did experience them).

If I had to do it all over again, I would give sleep top priority as I need to give it now.

time2lose
07-28-2013, 03:53 PM
If I go a couple of nights without sleeping well I definitely am more hungry than I normally am. I think that my body realizes that it needs more energy and is trying to get it through food.

Chronostasis
07-28-2013, 04:33 PM
Sleep is absolutely correlated with weight loss. I did 3 different papers and a presentation on the topic for college assignments, actually. Among others, leptin, ghrelin, growth hormone, and cortisol are all big players in the sleep-hunger system.
Personally, if I'm not getting adequate sleep then I don't see scale losses - sometimes even gains. Like freelancemomma said, statistically speaking sleeping excessively (>9 hours for adults, more for teens and children) is also bad for weight loss, but I don't know many people who sleep that much, haha.
I know life and other people make sleep difficult sometimes (I should know, I live with 6 younger siblings under 12 years old who don't like to sleep! :dizzy:) but if weight loss is your goal, I'd say do your best to make sleep a priority. :)

Lolo70
07-28-2013, 05:41 PM
I have to watch my sleep patterns carefully. It is more when I go to bed rather than how long I sleep. If I stay up half the night, I get chronically inflamed and that affects heart health. This, in turn, leads to fluid retention and weight gain. I am sure hormones are involved. There are plenty of studies out now that show cardiovascular problems in shift workers. We (probably all our cells) have an internal clock that regulates our metabolism.

I often worked nights when I had to make a deadline and survived on 2-4 hrs of sleep a night. I found that I need to eat more and preferably carbs to get through that. Maybe that is where the weight gain is mainly coming from. Your clock gets out of whack and your body tells you to eat. Given that you sleep less, you also have more time to eat.

Kery
08-04-2013, 06:27 AM
I don't know what it translates into in terms of hormones, but I've always thought that, logically, sleeping less = being awake for a longer time = getting hungry again = eating. (Being hungry while I'm asleep never wakes me up, nor prevents me from falling asleep, on the contrary.) The same way, if you sleep from 10 pm until, say, noon, you automatically skip breakfast --> less calories eaten during the day.

But it's probably one of those things that depend on individuals. I also know people who can't sleep if they're even slightly hungry, whereas if I eat past 7 pm, it means I just can't sleep before midnight-1 am (too much energy still in my system, I suppose).

Mori M
08-04-2013, 10:33 PM
i have insomnia and always snack at night. It's more out of boredom and frustration from lack of sleep than actual hunger.

alaskanlaughter
08-05-2013, 01:01 AM
I know that I struggle to stay within 1500 calories when I wake up at 5 a.m. and am physically active most of the day and go to bed at 9 p.m....I HAVE to get to sleep on time or it's impossibly hard to wake up at 5 a.m....I also sleep better if I don't eat near bedtime....

Kery
08-05-2013, 05:19 AM
Mori M - I suffer from insomnia, too, depending on the periods. Sometimes, I found myself taking my bike at 5 am to go to the nearest park and watch the animals there, just because I was so annoyed...

alaskanlaughter - As I said in my previous post, to me, it makes a lot of sense. Food is fuel, so if we fuel our bodies right before sleeping, even though part of this energy is then diverted towards digesting, I find it logical that we're ready for "action" and not for "rest".

Arrwillia
08-05-2013, 10:18 PM
Yeah, my friends and I had the "midnight mommy club" on Fb when our kids were all teething at the same time and we were up all night. We did snack a lot, just to stay awake. Now I don't snack so much since I've been tracking everything I eat, and I'm so busy during the day that I usually still have a few calories to spare at the end of the day. I'm staying within my calorie goals and keeping up with exercise (finally doing consistent 9:30 miles!!) but I'm t.i.r.e.d.

We're slowly but surely getting back into school routine since we all start back on the 19th. My kids are 12, 10, 9, 4.5 and honestly they are all a lot of help with housework and getting things done. Playing drill sergeant and entertainer 24/7 is itself exhausting though. And now that I've got them back on a somewhat normal schedule I find myself with insomnia, go figure. I'm trying to avoid naps though so I'll be more tired at night.

sacha
08-06-2013, 07:02 AM
Sleep helps you make better decisions regarding food and helps you recover better.

Like you, I've got a little brood that hasn't given me a full night's sleep in years. I've been able to lose the weight, but it was a lot harder than the first time (when I had no children). You CAN do this. It is not as easy as before, but it can be done. Good luck!

TooWicky
08-06-2013, 10:16 AM
I have never had a job that wasn't shift work in my entire life (I am in my late 40s.) I have also never had, like, routine off days either. Off days switch from week to week. I know some people do get to work normal hours, similar to 9-5pm, but that is something completely foreign to me, lol. Currently I work reduced part time hours, which enable me to have a lot more structure and routine to my day/week, and it's like night and day as far as helping me try to diet and lose weight.

aw man, shiftwork was terrible for weight gain for me! I used to think working 3rds (11pm to 7am or so) was the absolute worst as far gaining, but for a half dozen years, I worked rotating 12 hour shifts - as in rotating/flipping from 12 hour nights to 12 hour days WITHIN THE SAME WEEK with rotating off days. That was gawdawful. I honestly haven't made the connection until this thread, but I straight up gained... I'm adding it up... 55 lbs slowly over those 6 years. And I made that gain while doing a physical type job. That was the beginning of my being very obese : / and it didn't stop there. My sleep patterns (when I did sleep) were atrocious.

If I sleep decently, I have will power and also enjoy/crave healthier foods.

Great thread, it really made me think!

Lunula
08-07-2013, 05:18 PM
I've lost 81 lbs and I will say, I sleep IMMENSELY better now than I did before I lost the weight. However, I think it isn't only because of the weight loss itself, but because I am eating so much better (and less) and therefore do not have the constant stomach issues I once had (especially apparent when you're trying to fall asleep), I exercise regularly so I'm releasing tension and stress every day, I have much more confidence so I deal with things better throughout my day (leading to much less of a busy mind while trying to fall asleep) and honestly, I'm just plain happier (for all the reasons above) so I do not fret as much. I used to lie awake thinking about any and everything bad you can imagine, giving myself panic attacks and convincing myself that I was worthless. On top of that, I rarely physically felt very good, so I was a total insomniac. I was on Ambien for years (which, BTW, is a TERRIBLE idea because I have experienced major memory loss). I had many nights where I literally never fell asleep, or got 1-2 hours of sleep, and then had to work the next day.

I rarely have problems falling asleep now. When I do, it is almost never serious. Sometimes I still have that "busy mind" syndrome, but I think that's normal for most people.

crispin
08-07-2013, 06:13 PM
I gained and got to my highest weight ever during a 3 yr period when I couldn't get more than 4 hours of sleep and often got less. The sleep deprivation probably contributed to my weight gain, and it also caused a few hallucinations! :eek:

I highly value sleep. For me personally, to feel healthy sleep is the most important, then some exercise, then a healthy diet. Diet's important to lose weight but as long as I'm not consuming excess calories, I can feel ok on a medium quality diet. I *must* have sleep and activity though to feel good.