Weight Loss Support - Hunger or Eat Something Bad - Lesser of 2 Evils?




Amy Remixed
07-23-2013, 10:33 PM
I'm stuck at the office for another two hours watching workmen complete a project. Their delayed schedule has thrown me off my meal schedule. I'm so hungry. I have white rice I was going to throw out from my lunch. Is it better to eat the rice or go without food for two hours?


EatMoreCelery
07-23-2013, 10:35 PM
if you've already planned the rice into your meal plan for the day then why not eat it?

Vortex_VVV
07-23-2013, 10:44 PM
Whatever you decided, the important lesson is to make sure you have something "good" on hand (however you define good). For me that means stowing a bag of baby carrots in the fridge at the office and another at home. When hunger hits I never have an excuse not to eat a veggie.


rubidoux
07-23-2013, 10:47 PM
Well, I agree with EMC, that if you want to eat the rice, you should. I don't think it's gonna throw you off if you were planning on it.

OTOH, one of the most awesome diet secrets I've learned is that hunger is no big deal. If you wait, it'll go away in a few minutes, 15 or 20 tops. And then when it comes around again, it's just the same as it was the first time. It doesn't get worse, just stays the same, then goes away again. So... if you don't want to eat that rice, you will be fine. And I find that realizing that I'm in control, not my hunger, is very liberating and empowering.

PUPMOM5
07-23-2013, 10:49 PM
If it were me, waiting those two hours with that hunger would mean making BAD choices as soon as I got near food. Like, Taco Bell in the car on the drive home (Which, honestly, I plan into my days if I'm going to work 12+ hours) If this is you, eat the rice! If you know you'd be able to deal with the hunger and be smart when you get home, then by all means wait for something healthier later.

Amy Remixed
07-23-2013, 10:55 PM
The rice was not part of my meal plan. At lunch I ate the chicken breast and veggies off the top. The rice has been on my desk til now. I'll skip it. Threw it in the trash just now.

JohnP
07-24-2013, 12:12 AM
If you're not hypoglycemic or prone to binging there is no harm in being hungry for a couple hours.

Hunger comes in waves. Ignore it and it will lessen it's grip.

kaplods
07-24-2013, 01:35 AM
Well, I agree with EMC, that if you want to eat the rice, you should. I don't think it's gonna throw you off if you were planning on it.

OTOH, one of the most awesome diet secrets I've learned is that hunger is no big deal. If you wait, it'll go away in a few minutes, 15 or 20 tops. And then when it comes around again, it's just the same as it was the first time. It doesn't get worse, just stays the same, then goes away again. So... if you don't want to eat that rice, you will be fine. And I find that realizing that I'm in control, not my hunger, is very liberating and empowering.



God, I wish my hunger worked like that. I've never had hunger go away spontaneously by waiting. Nor does my hunger "stay the same." Once it becomes noticeable, it grows steadily until I eat. If I go to bed hungry, I stay awake and hungry, and if I do fall asleep my dreams are filled with hunger and food I cannot eat (and remaining hungry).

I do have blood sugar issues, but if blood sugar issues account for my experience of hunger, then I've had blood sugar issues at least since I was 5 years old, which I suppose is possible.


As to op's question, I think only experimenting can answer the question, but if you're prepared and always have good options available, the question will never come up.

freelancemomma
07-24-2013, 05:05 AM
While it's true that hunger comes in waves, I find there's an inverse relationship between my level of hunger and my willpower. For me, the best solution is to avoid anything more than very mild hunger. I do this by eating 3 meals (of approximately equal calories) and 2 small snacks in a typical day.

F.

carter
07-24-2013, 07:24 AM
Whatever you decided, the important lesson is to make sure you have something "good" on hand (however you define good). For me that means stowing a bag of baby carrots in the fridge at the office and another at home. When hunger hits I never have an excuse not to eat a veggie.

Agree with this completely - what you did this one time is less important than how you engineer your environment in the future so this doesn't happen again. Baby carrots don't work for me, but I try to have an apple and a Greek yogurt on hand for times when I might get stuck having to delay a meal.

Also, whatever you did this one time - don't sweat it! If you ate the rice and ended up going over for the day, no big deal - you can get right back on plan with the very next bite of food. It isn't even a blip.

Wannabeskinny
07-24-2013, 08:21 AM
Exercise your NO muscle. A 2hr hunger pang can and will be tolerated. Don't be controlled by hunger, that's just how I see it. I've been on a journey to make peace with hunger and I gotta tell you, where as before I used to see hunger as this big scary monster, by ignoring it I realize it's just a shadow and it can do nothing to hurt me. You do have to be careful though about the end of the time span, because you will be at a cross roads. Make sure you have a PLAN of what you're going to eat at the end of that 2hrs and even if it's a tomato just look forward to it and make it enticing so that you don't go through a drive thru.

QuilterInVA
07-24-2013, 09:34 AM
Good for you throwing the rice away. Hunger is not an emergency. We need to learn to deal with it just as we do with any other aspect of losing weight and getting fit. In the future, keep an emergency stash of healthy foods in your desk - 100 calorie packs of nuts, protein (not snack) bar, can of tuna, etc.

mandypandy2246
07-24-2013, 02:14 PM
Yes, make a plan NOW for what you will go find and eat two hours from now. If you wait the two hours, you may not make as good of a decision when you are super hungry (at least that is how it works for me!). But if you make the plan now ... before hunger gets worse - you cna go make a good decision when you have a chance to go eat.

nationalparker
07-24-2013, 02:27 PM
Good job! I'm trying to keep learning the Beck Diet Solution principle of "hunger is not an emergency" for us first-worlders. And when hungry, I perceive it to be HUNGRY, but in reality, I'm certainly not starving!

krampus
07-24-2013, 03:04 PM
If white rice is so bad, how come people in Northeast Asia are thin and live to be 100?

I'd eat some of the rice. Like others, I just...can't make smart decisions I won't regret if I'm blindsided by hunger.

Wannabeskinny
07-24-2013, 03:15 PM
If white rice is so bad, how come people in Northeast Asia are thin and live to be 100?

I'd eat some of the rice. Like others, I just...can't make smart decisions I won't regret if I'm blindsided by hunger.

The same can be said about all the different starches. How do Italians stay thin eating pasta? How do South Americans stay thin eating so much corn? How do Asians stay thin eating so much rice? How do the French stay so thin eating so much bread, cheese and wine? The OP's dilemma wasn't the rice, it was the unexpected change in her schedule that would deter her from her meal plan. It's something we all face in our day to day struggle. We develop skills that will help us get through these glitches. Dealing with hunger is a useful strategy, one that normal eaters execute daily.

mandypandy2246
07-24-2013, 09:32 PM
Yeah, to me the issue is not the white rice. White rice can definitely be in a healthy diet and weight loss plan. But if that is not what she planned for, and for her the amount of food/satiation is not worth it - not worth eating - particularly because white rice alone will probably spike blood sugar and she'll still be hungry again by the time she leaves work. For me - I treat each bite as a cost/benefit analysis. White rice is generally not worth it for me.

kaplods
07-24-2013, 10:25 PM
I don't like any food being labeled bad or unhealthy, so planned and unplanned or on-plan and off-plan being better labels.

Off topic a bit, but I think we Americans often have problems with carbs, especially higher glycemic carbs like pasta, potatoes, bread, and rice that are less common in thinner cultures for several reasons.

1. Food is cheaper and we can afford to eat more.

2. We tend to add more fat to carby foods (which makes it easier to eat more).

3. We don't eat nearly as many greens and other low-carb vegetables (or any vegetables) than folks from "thinner" cultues. The space veggies should take up on our plates are often replaced with more of the starch foods and fat.

4. We live much more sedentary lives, and have far more labor-saving devices.

5. Many thin cultured either graze/snack all day OR they eat 2-4 substantial meals. Americans often do both.

6. We tend to eat out more AND we tend to shop less frequently, so we stock up and have more food in the house than folks from traditionally thin cultures.

Some foods that are very healthy for thin and active folks, aren't quite so good for fat or sedentary folks. Sometimes it's easier to cut the carbs than it is to try to burn them off, especially once blood sugar issues like diabetes and insulin resistance crop up.

I know our favorite farmers market vendor, an elderly Hmong lady who is a very respected in her community as healer/shaman/herbalist, told hubby and I that we needed not eat rice, potato, bread... and more veggies, especially bitter melon (she could tell hubby had diabetes by looking at him. She told me I might too. At the time I had been diagnosed IR, but not yet diabetic). Other southeast asian friends (especially women) also told us that when they want to lose weight, they cut out or cut down on rice and eat more salads ans spicy foods like papaya salad.

So even in traditionally thin societies, what a person eats for weight loss isn't necessarily what one normally would eat if one didn't have to lose weight.

GMNEVO
07-24-2013, 10:37 PM
I vote for eating it mainly because I make the dumbest diet decisions when I'm hungry.

alaskanlaughter
07-24-2013, 11:01 PM
if given the opportunity when starving, I will eat as much junk as I can manage to scarf down...with no willpower or thoughts to my diet...I need to eat when reasonably hungry and not delay food too long or i'll regret my choices at that point

MAK247
07-25-2013, 12:05 AM
I can generally wait through hunger for quite a while, I rarely stop to eat lunch during a work day. However, I keep something non-perishable in my purse for emergencies. Right now I am toting around an applesauce pouch (the kind made for kids) it's only about 40-50 calories if I remember correctly, so it wouldn't break the calorie bank if I felt the need to have it.

sonickel77
08-10-2013, 10:16 AM
I'm learning to say no to food if I'm a bit hungry at the end of the day, instead of going past my diet allowance.

I just think of the starving children I saw in this documentary called "Zimbabwe's forgotten children" - (you can see it on Youtube). Children eating some maize once every four days, slowly starving to death, resorting to eating ants, bullfrogs and birds to survive. Horrifying stuff, but it puts my diet struggles into real perspective.

IanG
08-10-2013, 09:20 PM
Go hungry. Dieting is a form of mild, controlled starvation. With an emphasis on the mild and controlled.

A little hunger is good. It makes food that is good for you taste better.

Wannabeskinny
08-10-2013, 09:27 PM
Go hungry. Dieting is a form of mild, controlled starvation. With an emphasis on the mild and controlled.

A little hunger is good. It makes food that is good for you taste better.

Haha I like that, mild controlled starvation lol. It's true and I'm making that one of my go-to quotes lol.