Weight Loss Support - To anyone that lost 100+




View Full Version : To anyone that lost 100+


Slush
07-20-2013, 02:33 AM
I know many of us here are still on our journey, but I have noticed some that stuck around even after completing their weight loss. Either way, I have well over 100 pounds to lose. My question to anyone else in my position that made it is, how did you feel when you hit the 100 pound mark?

I don't really believe my scale yet. I've gotten down to 308 in that past, but after 2 years of health issues, it just caught up with me again. I honestly can't visualize weight loss-extreme weight loss-happening for me. I don't know why.. it could be anxiety or doubt, or any number of things. I have been at this weight for so long that it's hard to know anything else.

Any advice, tips of encouragment, etc is always appreciated. :hug:


nelie
07-20-2013, 06:32 AM
You lose 100 lbs by losing 1 lb at at a time. I lost 75 lbs quickly but then it took me 2 years to get to the 100 lb mark. I basically maintained my 75 lb loss until I was ready to lose again. Others don't have a stop in the middle. Remember though that the successes you have had are a step towards your goal.

betsy2013
07-20-2013, 11:09 AM
The first time I lost 100 pounds I felt wonderful -- both physically and emotionally. But, I didn't change my thinking about eating and eventually gained it all back. This time (not to 100 pounds yet, but I will get there), I realize that I'll need to track my food for the rest of my life. And that's ok because at 65 pounds I can do so much more, feel better, am getting compliments.

In terms of not being able to imagine yourself there. Right now, I'm just shooting to get under 300 pounds for the first time since the late '80s. Most people would be appalled if they weighed in the high 200s. I'll be thrilled. So if 100 pounds doesn't seem doable, think of yourself in 5 or 10 pound increments. In no time you'll notice a difference in your clothes and how you feel and what you can do. It's very liberating.


Elladorine
07-20-2013, 12:41 PM
I can't visualize losing so much. In fact, even after losing 100 pounds, I still can't. Maybe because 100 pounds is such a huge, abstract number? And I've never been anything but obese as an adult, even now. What's helped me all along is not focusing on the numbers, but focusing on every step I can take that will lead to a healthier me. I obviously want to lose weight, but why? Just for that number on the scale? No. It's because I want to feel better. Focus on that and the loss will happen. :)

And how did I feel when I hit the 100 pound mark? Honestly, it wasn't much of an event, but probably because doing so got me to a weight I'd already spent most of my life at (250-260 range). I was just happy to feel somewhat "normally" obese instead of super-super-morbidly obese. ;) I've still got a ways to go of course, but it's such a slow process that I never woke up one morning feeling completely different than the day before. It's a lifestyle change and overall outlook that can't go away if I want the healthier me to not only make further progress, but stick around.

gagalu
07-20-2013, 07:00 PM
relieved, proud, and like i still had a long way to go before i'd be happy with my body.

586
07-20-2013, 07:44 PM
It takes time, forgiveness and patience. :) It took me a year to take my weight from nearly 300 to the 170s (and a little below eventually) and it has taken a year of maintaining that weight loss with a lot of the three magic words above.

It happens a pound at a time, an inch at a time and sometimes you slide back and then you wake up the next day and continue on. I walked for my exercise - just upped the half-mile to 5 miles over time. I didn't start any other fancy exercise methods until I got my body used to regular, routine walking.

My diet wasn't anything special - my biggest caloric vice was a 2 liter a day soda habit. That's more than a day's worth of calories I was imbibing! So, once I began scaling that back and intaking more water and tea, it was a little easier to choose another thing to curb a bit the next week - like portion control. All baby steps. That's the stuff that helped me most. I didn't have anyone cheering me on or really even noticing my changes until I lost 60 pounds, and then suddenly everyone had to know my secret. No one ever believes it was a gradual redefining of eating and living.

You will find your rhythm in this. It will take time and patience and forgiveness, too. Be kind to yourself along the way. Learn to love yourself even on a bad day/week/month. Do something that makes your esteem soar - learn a new hobby, improve one you already know, find a goal outfit or trip you'd like to do... anything to get some fire in your belly. :)

KittyKatFan
07-20-2013, 10:39 PM
I rarely looked at the scale during Year 1 and didn't even know specifically when 100 lbs lost was reached. I remember seeing the scale when I weighed in on my one-year anniversary and I had lost 115 lbs. I was happy, but I also felt sort of depressed and impatient because I knew I still had 50 more to go.

You can get to 100 lbs lost. It isn't easy and you will have setbacks. But you just don't quit when those setbacks happen. Make a one-year commitment to yourself; I found that really helped me.

Slush
07-21-2013, 12:27 AM
Thank you all so much for your thoughtful replies. :)

jessicado22
07-21-2013, 06:11 PM
A few years ago I lost 100 pounds (310 to 210). As soon as I hit 210, I fell off the wagon and gained most of it back. My goal was 199, and it was like as soon as I got close I hit some weird mental block.

I started the weight loss journey again at 270, and when I hit the 210 mark again this year, I felt the urge to just start eating anything I wanted again. It took A LOT of willpower to stick with it, and now I am at 190.

For me, my goal was always 199. It was such a long ways off, and seemed like a dream. I never thought I would be able to go any smaller. When I hit 199, I realized I had done it...and I could go further. For the first time in over a decade, I set my new weight loss goal of 174, and who knows -- maybe I will even lower that! It is still hard (even harder as weight comes off slower now, lol).

The funny part is that I have now lost 120 pounds, but when I look in the mirror, I don't really see a difference. I can fit in smaller clothes, but all I really see is the fat rolls and to me, I look the same. I have read that from lots of other members who have lost weight, so I think it might be a pretty common thing.

So to answer your original question....I don't really feel any different. It is nice to fit in smaller clothes, and not shop in the plus size section. But I still feel uncomfortable with my back fat being exposed or my bat flaps. Maybe that will change overtime as I hopefully tone.

The big difference for me is my stamina. I can run now. I never imagined I could run. But now I run a 5K each day. And each week I can go faster. To me that is a huge accomplishment...I haven't run since I was forced to do the mile in highschool, and I don't even think I could complete it without walking then. 15 years later and I am running at least 3 miles a day. I feel amazing to do that. :)

Good luck on your journey! My best advice is to take it in chunks...299, 249, etc. And if you have a hard day and cheat...don't continue. Don't feel bad. Allow yourself that fumble, and then move on! Because if you despair and binge and fall off the wagon, then your journey will be even harder in the end. :)

Slush
07-21-2013, 09:13 PM
jessicado22, your post couldn't have come at a better time. Today has been really difficult and I did cheat a lot today. I started feeling really bad, even ashamed, and I came here and just as I was hoping, read a message like yours.

I think the hardest part for me will be accepting that my new, healthier eating habits will have to be for life. I haven't had soda in weeks and I miss it and it's hard to think that I'll never be able to have it again. Sure, I can have a sip here and there and splurge a little on special occasions, but I can never go back to drinking it everyday, just like I can't go back to eating my favorite chips and italian dishes multiple times a week.

It's like taking drugs away from a junkie in a lot of ways. I know that I have used food emotionally for a long time, but it's not just breaking the emotional need for food, it's telling myself that what I've been doing is wrong and it has to change. I don't think anyone likes feeling like they did something harmful to themselves and something they were doing is wrong and shouldn't be continued. If only we could all be 100 pounds and eat whatever we wanted like some of those lucky girls.

jessicado22
07-22-2013, 10:00 AM
Awww....support hugs!

I know for me, I would cheat...and then feel guilty and then just deal with my guilt by cheating more. I cannot tell you how many times I would start to diet and then cheat/cheat more and then just give up all together. And then in the long run I would weigh even more than I did in the first place.

This might sound kinda silly, but for me I realized that for every pound gained, it was a double whammy. Now I had to lose more weight before I even got back to my starting place before!

And I feel you on the soda -- I don't actually drink soda, but my arch nemesis is blended chai drinks. Mmmmm... I drank them all the time and they are about 500 calories each! When I started my weight loss journey this time in April, I vowed to give up chai for 3 months. I only cheated a few times over those few months, but if you figure 500 - 1000 calories a day that I was drinking -- imagine how much that adds up over time! Those 3 months are over as of a few weeks ago, but I still have only had a few chais since realizing how drinking calories isn't exactly beneficial....even if they are delicious, lol.

I also feel you on the food vs drugs...my hubby (who has great metabolism), doesn't really understand what I am going through. He drinks soda, eats sugary snacks late at night, every night, eats fast food, etc and maintains just fine. He also doesn't understand why I can't keep my favorite food around...because I will eat the entire bag of cheetos, or the entire box of cookies. He can eat it or leave it. He just tells me "well, you need more willpower". You need to shut your face, lol. I would almost be better off not eating at all, literally. When I have fasted in the past, it was EASIER not to eat! There were no limits to worry about. That is where it gets hard. Eating, but limiting and avoiding....ugh! So in a way drugs are easier to stop. Because you stop. There is no grey area -- you either do them or don't. Our drug, food, is something we can't just quit...we are forced a little of our drug everyday for the rest of our lives -- which is harder in so many ways!

Slush
07-24-2013, 03:22 AM
It is so nice to talk to someone that really understands, to be able to learn from each other and inspire one another. I wish your husband understood better, but I think it's hard for people to understand something they don't have to deal with. It's always easier to tell someone to stop doing something when you don't have the same urge to do it. I really appreciate you reaching out to me. This forum always makes me feel better, so many beautiful souls willing to help and inspire you. :)

HeidiNicole
07-24-2013, 03:39 PM
And how did I feel when I hit the 100 pound mark? Honestly, it wasn't much of an event, but probably because doing so got me to a weight I'd already spent most of my life at (250-260 range). I was just happy to feel somewhat "normally" obese instead of super-super-morbidly obese. ;)

This pretty much sums up exactly how I'm feeling...not to 100 pounds yet, but very close and I'm feeling very 'meh' about it...I thought I'd be more excited, but really I'm at now what I've spent most of my adult life at...the next half of my loss will be all pretty new territory for me, so I expect to have a stronger reaction to it.

Elladorine
07-24-2013, 04:13 PM
This pretty much sums up exactly how I'm feeling...not to 100 pounds yet, but very close and I'm feeling very 'meh' about it...I thought I'd be more excited, but really I'm at now what I've spent most of my adult life at...the next half of my loss will be all pretty new territory for me, so I expect to have a stronger reaction to it.
I see we have very similar stats! I'm sure things will hit you in a more positive light once you start getting into that new territory. :hug: I was 250-275 throughout all of high school and throughout much of my adult life, and managed to briefly get down to the 220 range just twice (both times in my 20's) before things really spiraled out of control and I climbed up to 360. Once I very slowly started losing weight again, I struggled once more working beyond the 250 range (but I at least maintained my 100 lb. loss). I didn't start getting excited until I began pushing again and finally dipped below 250, the number I'd always struggled with getting under. And I got super-excited once I finally broke under 220 for the first time since my mid-20's! I'm currently pregnant and am cringing over knowing I'm definitely going to have to go over 220 before I can start losing again. :dizzy:

Slush
07-24-2013, 10:37 PM
Elladorine, congrats on the pregnancy! You're an inspiration to me just for losing so much weight more than once! You obviously have what it takes, the will-power and strength. Is Elladorine your name by the way, because it's really pretty, never heard anything like it.

Elladorine
07-25-2013, 12:20 AM
Elladorine, congrats on the pregnancy! You're an inspiration to me just for losing so much weight more than once! You obviously have what it takes, the will-power and strength. Is Elladorine your name by the way, because it's really pretty, never heard anything like it.
Aw, thank you! :hug: Wanting to get pregnant was my main motivation for starting over last year, as I was on a regain due to letting stress get to me, was surprised with my first pregnancy, and ended up miscarrying. :( I vowed to take better care of myself in hopes of not only carrying a healthy baby full-term, but to be an active, healthy mom. And if I've learned anything from the past year, it's to never give up! Although I'm a little down in the dumps tonight as I broke back over 220 again, at the very least it's for a good cause. :dizzy: Oh, and I came up with Elladorine by combining my maiden name, my married name, and adding -ine to the end of it for flair.

Good luck to you, you can do this! :hug: :)

Slush
07-29-2013, 08:05 PM
Aw, thank you! :hug: Wanting to get pregnant was my main motivation for starting over last year, as I was on a regain due to letting stress get to me, was surprised with my first pregnancy, and ended up miscarrying. :( I vowed to take better care of myself in hopes of not only carrying a healthy baby full-term, but to be an active, healthy mom. And if I've learned anything from the past year, it's to never give up! Although I'm a little down in the dumps tonight as I broke back over 220 again, at the very least it's for a good cause. :dizzy: Oh, and I came up with Elladorine by combining my maiden name, my married name, and adding -ine to the end of it for flair.

Good luck to you, you can do this! :hug: :)

Looking at your overall starting weight, you have come very far! I would be so proud of myself if I were you, and I'm sure you are. I get down too. Last Thursday I was 327, and the next day I was 329. I was like what the ****? It must have been a fluke though, because I'm 325 right now. It's slow, but 8 pounds in one month and only eating half-way healthy and not exercising at all yet is a feat in itself.

I'm nowhere near ready to have children myself, but I wonder the same thing, if being this heavy would prevent that or limit me from being the parent I want to be. I wish you all the best, truly. You sound like such a determined, strong woman. One day you will carry a baby to full term, and you and baby will be healthy and happy. :)