Weight Loss Support - Your food habits compared to a "normal" eater's food habits...




GotothegymOKAY
05-31-2013, 11:41 AM
Your food habits VS "normal people's" food habits.

I'll start.
I went along with a guy friend to do his grocery shopping with him, and he got tons of amazing, tempting snack foods. The entire rest of the day, he didn't crack open one bag/box of anything because he had no "interest to eat that right now." If that were me, I would've started eating the food in the car ride home. :(

I was with my sister the other day and dinner was in the oven. I opened her cabinets and took out chips and salsa. I was chowing down in front of the TV and realized she wasn't eating. When I asked her why she wasn't eating these amazing chips and salsa in front of her face, she looked at me like I was crazy and said, "Why would I eat that when I'm about to eat dinner in 15 minutes?" She's right. It makes so much sense. Why can't I grasp that?

I'm jealous of people with "normal brains." It just shows me how unhealthy my relationship with food is.

Anyone else have stories to share?


PreciousMissy
05-31-2013, 11:52 AM
Oh, that is so my boyfriend! He can go all day without eating because he's not hungry. For him, there is no such thing as eating on a schedule or a certain amount of calories per day. He eats when he's hungry and stops when he's full...and he eats whatever he wants. He's 5'10" and weighs 170. Even his doctor is surprised that his weight only fluctuates by 3lb.

Amarantha2
05-31-2013, 12:01 PM
But what is normal? So many recent 3FC threads discuss what normal is in regard to weight & eating & seemingly address readers & potential posters as though we are all NOT normal but everyone else is lol.

I personally think most people are "normal" in that most of the human race is very much like the rest of the human race & behave differently only to the extent of cultural differences & circumstances.

Does anyone have some verified scientific, well established, wide ranging data as to what normal eating behavior is?

Asked respectfully & have a great day all! :wave:


elvislover324
05-31-2013, 12:08 PM
I'm going to piggy back on your comments as they totally apply to me too!


[COLOR="red"]I'll start.
I went along with a guy friend to do his grocery shopping with him, and he got tons of amazing, tempting snack foods. The entire rest of the day, he didn't crack open one bag/box of anything because he had no "interest to eat that right now." If that were me, I would've started eating the food in the car ride home. :(


That's how my husband is. He can have a box of unopened snacks that last through our next food shopping and if I say "Do you need a snack?", he will respond that he still has the said snack from last week unopened. (The good part of my diet is that I don't like the snacks he likes so I'm never tempted!) I used to always grab myself a snack for the ride home from food shopping too, and it was never an apple or an orange. It was chicken fingers from the prepared food section, a bag of chips at the register, or <gasp> open the bread, the cold cuts and the chips and make a sandwich in the car. Who does that? I used to.... It would never ever occur to my husband to eat on the way home from shopping or even when we walk in the door (I used to open packages of things I just *had* to have right then, could be 3-4-5 things).



I was with my sister the other day and dinner was in the oven. I opened her cabinets and took out chips and salsa. I was chowing down in front of the TV and realized she wasn't eating. When I asked her why she wasn't eating these amazing chips and salsa in front of her face, she looked at me like I was crazy and said, "Why would I eat that when I'm about to eat dinner in 15 minutes?" She's right. It makes so much sense. Why can't I grasp that?


When we go to certain friends of ours for a Saturday night, they either plan to have snacks or to order pizza. The snacks will usually be a veggie tray, chips & salsa, a warm appetizer (sometimes a cheese dip with crackers or stuffed mushrooms) and that's it for the night with our drinks. If they decide it's pizza night, then it's just the veggie tray prior. When it's our turn to host, it's all of the above!! It would never occur to me not to have appetizers, snacks, pizza and then dessert to top it off! No wonder she was 180lbs less than me (yes 180 LESS)...


I'm jealous of people with "normal brains." It just shows me how unhealthy my relationship with food is.


I will never have a normal brain in regards to food. I don't even know if I ever did. I think I loved food for my whole life. And my mom was so generous to her 4 children, she'd make us whatever we wanted (even if it was 4 different meals because we wanted something different. Spoiled brats we were). I mean, not every night but more often than not. If we didn't want chicken, she'd make us a hamburger. She never wanted us to be hungry. Out of the 4 of us, I'm the oldest and really the only one who gained ridiculous weight as an adult (I was fairly thin til I was 18 but was so active til I got a car and a job.). A lot of my eating I believe had to do with unresolved emotional issues but that's a story for another thread.

I'm jealous of people too. Food is everywhere, we need it to survive, it's an addiction. But hopefully I have a grasp on it this time. HOPE-FULL-Y.

newleaf123
05-31-2013, 12:52 PM
I agree with Amarantha. What *is* normal? It seems that we all struggle with a similar set of issues so doesn't that make us normal and not outliers? Especially nowadays, if more people are overweight than not.

Health Nut
05-31-2013, 01:45 PM
Whenever I used to hang out with my group of friends in college, every time that we have our daily break I would want something to eat: sandwich, chips... etc. But they only do that like once a week, max! And when that happens it's usually a cup of coffee or something. I don't know how they can't get hungry after 4 hours of lectures and just "sit there" on their break with nothing to eat. To be honest, I still don't think that's not normal and you have to have lunch when it's noon. :(

Arctic Mama
05-31-2013, 01:47 PM
Yup, I don't even know what normal would constitute, anymore! My 'normal' father eats protein bars and yogurt all day before gorging on Mexican for dinner. My 'normal' father in law eats huge breakfasts, snacks on nuts and cheese and salmon, then lots of ice cream and salad to top it off. My 'normal' stepmother could live off of canned soup and always seems to be trying to lose fifteen pounds before hastily gaining it back.

These days I'm convinced there's no healthy normal. Healthy eating makes one aberrant, and normal seems to be piles of junk and convenience food, if we'e going by statistical prevalence as the definition of 'normal'. By my grandma' definition I'm probably one of the most normal eaters I know, given what I eat and how much. And yet I'm so far from normal, with my weight reduced state and particular menu choices.

I take food habits from all sorts of places, if they fit my goals. My intention isn't for normal, but *livable* for me. The more I observe people's eating the less commonalities I find!

rubidoux
05-31-2013, 02:08 PM
I would also love to know what normal is.

One thing I became very conscious of in the last couple of years is that some people really think of food primarily as fuel. I might have eaten when hungry, and was technically fueling, but the prominent role of food in my life was to cause me pleasure. My husband could always just grab some random thing out of the fridge and it didn't matter to much to him whether it was something he loved or not. But I would never eat something that wasn't just what I wanted, which was always pretty terrible for me. And of course, it was fine w me if I wasn't hungry (a state I rarely got to, honestly) as long as the food was yummy.

Now I suppose I am even farther from normal. I usually fast for around 20 to 24 hours, eat one meal and sometimes one snack. I tend to eat the same foods over and over ( my meal is normally 1 avocado and 2 salmon patties, my snack 1 ounce cheese, 1 ounce almonds, 2 little wedges dark chocolate). Two or three times a week I'll have something different. That cannot be normal! lol

angelarm
05-31-2013, 02:28 PM
Here's mine: I was at a party recently and somehow the topic of ice cream came up. Someone said something to the effect of "We all probably have a gallon of ice cream that's been in the freezer for months." Everyone nodded, but inside my head I thought "What????" Ice cream is something I binge on and so I NEVER keep it in my freezer. It wouldn't last a day, much less a month!

I actually think there might be a "normal" only in the sense that it's how our bodies are meant to operate. The more I read about insulin resistance and carbohydrates and sugar, the more I think that there's something PHYSICAL about my overeating. I have plenty of willpower in every other part of my life, and I just can't believe that people who don't overeat are just naturally more virtuous than I. (Especially since I watch plenty of my thin friends drink more than they should, spend excessively, etc.) There's gotta be a physiological component that makes some of us have so much trouble with this.

sacha
05-31-2013, 02:43 PM
don't forget the 3rd category - those of us who would love to dive in to that salsa or snacks on the way home and tell ourselves that we shouldn't/can't because we have to stay on plan.

it would be lovely to have that 'normal' brain (although I would argue normal biology dictates stuffing yourself! the world of abundance is doing us in!), it is possible to strike a balance between 'abnormal brain' and learning habits of control for long-term success.

celigirl88
05-31-2013, 04:37 PM
There is no "normal" I feel like. What may be "normal" to me may not be "normal" to another person. To kind of go off what the OP said - there are times I will go to a store and see something sweet and think "those candies looking effing amazing" and buy them. But then will go days without eating them. I think psychologically it's just the happiness knowing I have something to snack on when and if I get a craving. A "normal" eating day for me is nothing compared to my dad who could probably eat a good 5000 calories a day and stay a skinny mini and the same size as he was in high school.

freelancemomma
05-31-2013, 04:39 PM
Your food habits VS "normal people's" food habits.

I'm jealous of people with "normal brains."[/COLOR]

Me too. And I also find them incredibly annoying -- way too "sensible" for me. I've said this many times, but I think they key difference between "naturally thin" people and the rest of us is that the thinnies just don't WANT food the same way we do. They may be receiving the same hunger signals, but they interpret them differently. They may be smelling or looking at the same delicious food, but it doesn't have the same allure for them.

Freelance

freelancemomma
05-31-2013, 04:44 PM
I agree with Amarantha. What *is* normal? It seems that we all struggle with a similar set of issues so doesn't that make us normal and not outliers? Especially nowadays, if more people are overweight than not.

I don't think the semantics are the important issue (normal vs. not normal), but the range of responses to food among humans. I don't think all humans struggle with the same food issues. Perhaps most of us on this board do, but years of observation have made it clear to me that there is a subset of people who don't find it difficult to moderate their eating and don't have food on the brain very much.

F.

lin43
05-31-2013, 06:53 PM
Oh, that is so my boyfriend! He can go all day without eating because he's not hungry. For him, there is no such thing as eating on a schedule or a certain amount of calories per day. He eats when he's hungry and stops when he's full...and he eats whatever he wants. He's 5'10" and weighs 170. Even his doctor is surprised that his weight only fluctuates by 3lb.

You've just described my husband to a tee (other than the fact that he's 6 ft and 180). His weight doesn't even fluctuate a pound!! How is that??
The other day, we had gone to Starbucks, but he doesn't care for their food, so he just had a coffee. Later that morning, around 11:00, I asked him if he had eaten. He said, "Not yet." He didn't eat until 12:30, and that was only because I was making myself some lunch and asked if he wanted any. I guarantee you that if I had not, he would have waited until dinner. I asked him how it is possible that he wasn't hungry. His reply: "I am hungry, but so what? What's the worst that could happen if I don't eat? I pass out? I doubt that will happen." Amazing!

There are many, many differences between the way I think and the way a normal eater thinks. One is that I will actually think about and plan the goodies I want to eat. For instance, I have it in my mind that tomorrow after CrossFit, I will be going to a bakery to buy an artisan salt bagel. Next Friday, I plan to go to a gourmet cheese store / cafe in my area because they have a new, gourmet macaroni and cheese every Friday. This probably has to do with calorie counting and "saving" my calories for food like that.


And I also find them incredibly annoying -- way too "sensible" for me

Me, too!! I wonder why I feel that annoyance. Is it jealousy? I cannot figure it out.

As for those who are questioning what normal is, to me the definition of that as regards eating is not being obsessed / overly focused on food, especially when one lives in a country where it is plentiful. To me, it seems abnormal to have an almost "survival" attitude toward food ("I must eat now!" "I must eat this entire bag of [fill in the blank]" etc.) in a country where such an attitude is unnecessary.

pnkrckpixikat
05-31-2013, 08:40 PM
I wish I could have a "normal" relationship with baked goods. Over memorial day weekend we decided to get cookies from the bakery but I wanted one sort that was special for the holiday and hubby wanted another. both kinds only came in a platter of 50 so we ended up with 100 cookies. We figured we would have some and send whatever was left on Tuesday to his work to be finished off... NONE WERE LEFT :( :( :(

from friday to monday night hubby had maybe 15-20 cookies, I had the rest. once they were in the house I just kept eating them. Not fast enough to make myself ill, or really even particularly full, but steadily enough that i ate 80-85 in 4 days

BreathingSpace
06-01-2013, 12:41 AM
I don't think the semantics are the important issue (normal vs. not normal), but the range of responses to food among humans. I don't think all humans struggle with the same food issues. Perhaps most of us on this board do, but years of observation have made it clear to me that there is a subset of people who don't find it difficult to moderate their eating and don't have food on the brain very much.

F.

Yes! Let's not get caught up in the semantics of normal. It's pretty obvious what OP meant.

I also have the problem of eating simply "because it's there". I don't see food as fuel, it's really exciting to me, it makes my day, if I'm sad I get a donut, if there are snacks in my house I eat them. If I get a craving for something I absolutely obsess over it.

My brother is the opposite. He sees food as fuel. He can excited/happy if we have something that is special to him, but he enjoys it in the moment and then never thinks about it again. I wish I was more like him.

Skinnyminnie Wannabe
06-01-2013, 08:54 PM
Me too. And I also find them incredibly annoying -- way too "sensible" for me. I've said this many times, but I think they key difference between "naturally thin" people and the rest of us is that the thinnies just don't WANT food the same way we do. They may be receiving the same hunger signals, but they interpret them differently. They may be smelling or looking at the same delicious food, but it doesn't have the same allure for them.


Precisely! ;)


There are many, many differences between the way I think and the way a normal eater thinks. One is that I will actually think about and plan the goodies I want to eat. For instance, I have it in my mind that tomorrow after CrossFit, I will be going to a bakery to buy an artisan salt bagel. Next Friday, I plan to go to a gourmet cheese store / cafe in my area because they have a new, gourmet macaroni and cheese every Friday. This probably has to do with calorie counting and "saving" my calories for food like that.

As for those who are questioning what normal is, to me the definition of that as regards eating is not being obsessed / overly focused on food, especially when one lives in a country where it is plentiful. To me, it seems abnormal to have an almost "survival" attitude toward food ("I must eat now!" "I must eat this entire bag of [fill in the blank]" etc.) in a country where such an attitude is unnecessary.

Yes, this. Also I'll add the observation I've made of people who can take or leave dessert! Say what?! I can go for a healthier dessert, but to just stop at the end of a meal and not need something to "get the taste of it out of your mouth" which are my mother's exact words, don't ask me where she got that but I internalized it as the norm.

And like you, lin43, I "get my stomach all set" for something - or maybe it's really my tastebuds that get set but I think of it as my stomach. And if there's something else at the last minute, say a friend wants to have something else that I'm not that enthused about, or even dislike, I feel this ridiculous cheated feeling! :( And am not above sneaking what I really wanted at the first opportunity.

Now there have been some times when I'm doing well with my system (Martha Beck's 4-Day-Win) that I am less this way. I think I need to get her book out and re-read it.

shcirerf
06-02-2013, 01:05 AM
I could probably go back to my child hood, and write you a book about normal.

However, it would not be normal. My mother always has been and still is obese. However, she did make an effort, to try to teach us kids better.:hug:

We grew up on a farm, back in the late 60's and early 70's. We were then what the "ORGANIC" folks are trying to be now. Go figure.:dizzy:

Anyway, to make a long story short, we need to slow down, pay more attention!

Eat meals together, shut off the Tv, and the X box, and the computer and facebook, put "DOWN" the cell phone and tablet!

When I was a kid, meal time was somewhat about food, but it was also about family time! We sat at the table, we said "Grace", we took our time, we visited, we passed the food, and said please and thank you!

Granted, after a long day, of wheat harvest, or moving cattle, or working with 4-H calves or breaking horses, or swathing hay or whatever, you might be fricking starving, you still said "Grace", and you still had to be polite, and pass, all the dishes around, and it was so "TABOO" to begin to eat, until all dishes had made their way around the table!

To this day, we still eat at the table, we still say "Grace", pass the food, and the salt, pepper, etc., and are mindful, that it's not polite to begin eating, until every thing has made the rounds!:D

freelancemomma
06-02-2013, 08:00 AM
And am not above sneaking what I really wanted at the first opportunity.

Wanna hear something totally ridiculous? In March I was with my teenage son at the Dallas airport, on our way back to Toronto. We had quite a while to wait for our flight (it was a stopover), so had dinner at a nice restaurant. I wanted to get the caramel cheesecake for dessert, but decided not to. After we'd left the restaurant and gone to our gate I changed my mind, so I told my son to wait and I'd be back in a few minutes. Went back to the restaurant, stood in line at the takeout counter, finally got my cheesecake, sat down somewhere and ate it. This took a little longer than I'd anticipated, and by the time I got back to the gate it was 10 minutes before flight time and my son had just had me paged.

What's especially ridiculous about the whole incident is the mentality underlying it: THIS IS THE LAST DAY OF MY VACATION, SO MY LAST CHANCE TO INDULGE BEFORE RETURNING TO REAL LIFE. (I'm sure Kaplods would have a thing or two to say about that.)

I haven't revealed what I did to anyone IRL, including my son.

Freelance

kaplods
06-02-2013, 12:19 PM

What's especially ridiculous about the whole incident is the mentality underlying it: THIS WAS THE LAST DAY OF MY VACATION, SO MY LAST CHANCE TO INDULGE BEFORE RETURNING TO REAL LIFE. (I'm sure Kaplods would have a thing or two to say about that…

Freelance

Anything I might say at the moment would by casting stones. The walls of my glass house are especially fragile right now.

I'm trying to re-lose about 10 to 15 lbs, and I keep gaining and losing the same 10 lbs.

And while I can blame a little bit of that weight on stress and medication, the bigger portion is due to surrendering to that crazy little inner voice that says, "You deserve this. Yeah, it'll make you sicker in the long run, bu right now, at this moment, you deserve to feel the way only the "deadly trio" can make you feel. The deadly trio being the addictive flavor combination of salt, fat, and high glycemic carbs, as talked about by David Kessler in The End of Overeating (I don't think he actually used the words deadly trio, but it's how I think of them).

I currently have an extremely itchy face, with several huge pimples (one is almost large enough to consider a boil) because I decided yesterday that I "deserved" some of the pizza that hubby bought for his gaming party. I used a knife and fork to avoid the crust on the first slice - and threw away the crust. I then took a second piece ( and feeling so virtuous from the first slice) and decided that I deserved a nibble of the crust. That nibble turned into eating the whole crust.

Knowing better is the easy part, following through, especially with all the inner voices trying to convince me (myself, really since the voices belong to me) that "just this once," is valid reasoning, especially when the just-this-onces are piling up into small and not so small obstacles to the ultimate goal.

It's so frustrating to me that a bit of medical relapse has undone so much hard work, and it could easily become so much worse (I don't know what I'll do if I have to be on extended courses of prednisone - and that's what will happen if I don't reign in the cravings and ingestion of unhealthy carbs).

Desiderata
06-02-2013, 05:04 PM
WORD to the "feeling cheated" issue of getting a food idea fixed in your head and then not being able to have it. It is so silly, when you think about it, and I am so 100% guilty of it more often than I'd like. My day-to-day diet is pretty good, but take-out is still my frenemy. And once I think I want Thai (or whatever), that's that. We even went out for Thai two nights ago and I intended to get pad thai, but got talked into trying something else at the last minute (we're still testing out a new place). The dish was good, but part of my brain is still sassing me about the fact I didn't get to have pad thai. Be quiet, brain! :p

I feel like I have to re-learn my lessons from time to time when my commitment and motivation fades. It has a teeny bit to do with memory issues for me, I think, because this happens in a lot of other parts of life -- my brain just can't hold onto all my hard-won knowledge. When things are starting to go awry, I'm trying to go back to sources that got me really inspired (books, blogs, etc).... plus I spend extra time here. ;) When I do, it's a lightbulb moment - "Oh, of course!" Colleen - no judgment because I know that scenario all too well. Hugs and hopes that you can re-ignite/find your way back to your path soon.

Wannabeskinny
06-03-2013, 10:04 AM
For the life of me I can't figure out how people eat a sandwich without chips. It's absurd eat a sandwich without chips. I feel incomplete without it. Hence, I don't eat sandwiches anymore because it makes me crave chips too much.

When I step into my car the first thought that comes to my mind is "which drive thru?" Most times I can resist but sometimes I can't. It's just ingrained in me.

People are made up of habits. You break a habit, you make a habit, that's all it is. My husband is the same as you describe above, he can go all day and not eat and not think about it and be fine. Me? I'm a raging lunatic if I miss a meal by 10min.


I actually think there might be a "normal" only in the sense that it's how our bodies are meant to operate. The more I read about insulin resistance and carbohydrates and sugar, the more I think that there's something PHYSICAL about my overeating. I have plenty of willpower in every other part of my life, and I just can't believe that people who don't overeat are just naturally more virtuous than I. (Especially since I watch plenty of my thin friends drink more than they should, spend excessively, etc.) There's gotta be a physiological component that makes some of us have so much trouble with this.

You're absolutely right. If food is fuel, then it makes a big difference what kind of fuel you put in your body. Sure, we can all fit in a day of 1600cal in junk food, who hasn't done that and felt like "well I'm within my calorie range for the day so I'm fine" but didn't lose a pound and felt awful afterwards? I know I have. The foods we eat have a physiological effect on us. If I eat sugar today, I'm going to binge tomorrow. That's not a theory, that's a fact that I've proven over and over and over again. The more nutritious the food, the less I crave junk.

jennyplain
06-03-2013, 12:45 PM
It's funny that I would see this topic today! The issue of feeling "cheated" has been one that I've talked about a lot with my therapist. I have distinct memories of being a kid and being served a meal that I hated - lamb chops, broccoli, most kinds of green vegetables - and feeling resentful of the fact that I had to eat all of it. It was yucky and I didn't like it, and my dad was big on the "clean your plate" mentality.

So because I didn't get what I WANTED, and I was forced to consume what I didn't want, I would feel justified in sneaking down to the kitchen later and eating bags of chips and cookies and candy. It's funny how that feeling of resentment never goes away, and even now when plans change or the food I was planning on ordering/cooking doesn't turn out like I want it to, I can use it for binge justification.

(I'm not sure what I'd do with my own kids - definitely they wouldn't have to clean their plate, but I can't deal with making individual dishes for everyone in the house. Guess it's good I don't have any yet - more time to figure it out!)

Katydid77
06-03-2013, 12:48 PM
. I guarantee you that if I had not, he would have waited until dinner. I asked him how it is possible that he wasn't hungry. His reply: "I am hungry, but so what? What's the worst that could happen if I don't eat? I pass out? I doubt that will happen." Amazing!



I think that THIS is a HUGE and understated difference in all of this. I believe that in the slight chemical variations our bodies all have from one another, some folks brains get MUCH more wired to keeping emotional balance based on hunger/full signals.

My Dad and Brother are awesome, great men, but they are both very very susceptible to bad mood swings if they are hungry. They will get temperamental and cranky and in general be a headache to be around. Also, they get to where they don't want to eat b/c of their bad mood, etc. Neither one of them 'wants' food when they get in these moods, but the only way they will snap out of it is to eat.

I can't tell you how many times my mom (and later myself) has just said, 'okay, this party stops until you eat something' because the mood was quickly becoming hostile.

And when they eat, grumbling the whole time, they will literally become new people within like 30 mins! I think it's their man equivalent of a woman having a good cry! LOL

For people like your husband, this simply is not the case, his mood is not that connected to his hunger signals. His brain separates the two much more effectively.

He doesn't 'need' to eat to feel better. Eating only makes him full, it doesn't dramatically alter his mood or emotions.

I really think that is the key to so much of this. The mental separation of hunger from emotions and other bodily chemical dependencies.

How much we can effect that I do not know. If our brains have created those pathways, I don't know if we can alter them or not. Or is it a matter of just putting ourselves into enough hunger situations for our minds to accept it's should not create the dramatic reaction that we have become accustomed to.

I don't know.

CanadianMomma
06-03-2013, 01:10 PM
I'm curious to know if anyone has found their own food habits have changed as they've adopted a healthier lifestyle?

I was at one point over 200 lb and my weight would fluctuate depending on if I was working and what season it was. When I was working I know I didn't engage in as much mindless eating and when the seasons were warmer I was just more active.

When I consciously decided to develop a healthier lifestyle I knew a big part of the reason I was overweight was how differently I approached food compared to my husband. Like so many others he didn't feel the need to eat just because it was breakfast/lunch/dinner, he didn't even feel he had to eat when he was HUNGRY (wth?).

I dropped down 20 lbs, which wasn't a huge amount but I was happy with the progress and decided I wanted to see if I could maintain the loss. I've found in the time since that my attitude/habits with food changed and I have had very little problem staying at 160 (even while pregnant).

I do still eat for pleasure instead of fuel, but somehow being aware of this means I limit it much more. I no longer feel a compulsion to eat just because it is a certain time of the day and if I actually tend to just eat food in proportion to how hungry I am.

Has anyone else found their own habits/attitude towards foods changed in their weight loss journey? Or does it feel for most people that they have a set view of food and that no matter what it doesn't really change?

lin43
06-03-2013, 07:48 PM
For people like your husband, this simply is not the case, his mood is not that connected to his hunger signals. His brain separates the two much more effectively.

He doesn't 'need' to eat to feel better. Eating only makes him full, it doesn't dramatically alter his mood or emotions.

I really think that is the key to so much of this. The mental separation of hunger from emotions and other bodily chemical dependencies.

How much we can effect that I do not know. If our brains have created those pathways, I don't know if we can alter them or not. Or is it a matter of just putting ourselves into enough hunger situations for our minds to accept it's should not create the dramatic reaction that we have become accustomed to.

I don't know.

I agree. I, too, get irritable if I do not eat. I'm wondering if it has something to do with insulin. I take after my father, and his side of the family is replete with diabetics. I've checked my sugar on and off for years,and I'm in the normal range, but I still wonder.

lin43
06-03-2013, 07:52 PM
Wanna hear something totally ridiculous? In March I was with my teenage son at the Dallas airport, on our way back to Toronto. We had quite a while to wait for our flight (it was a stopover), so had dinner at a nice restaurant. I wanted to get the caramel cheesecake for dessert, but decided not to. After we'd left the restaurant and gone to our gate I changed my mind, so I told my son to wait and I'd be back in a few minutes. Went back to the restaurant, stood in line at the takeout counter, finally got my cheesecake, sat down somewhere and ate it. This took a little longer than I'd anticipated, and by the time I got back to the gate it was 10 minutes before flight time and my son had just had me paged.

What's especially ridiculous about the whole incident is the mentality underlying it: THIS IS THE LAST DAY OF MY VACATION, SO MY LAST CHANCE TO INDULGE BEFORE RETURNING TO REAL LIFE. (I'm sure Kaplods would have a thing or two to say about that.)

I haven't revealed what I did to anyone IRL, including my son.

Freelance

I'm so glad you shared this. You know that we all probably have a similar story to tell (i.e., "similar" in the sense that we have gone WAY out of our way to acquire some goody with the mindset that this is our "last chance" before [fill in the blank]). My sisters are the same. I remember once my younger sister came to visit me, and she, my husband, and I were walking through the mall, shopping. She and I spotted this cafe with some yummy looking cake in the window. My husband sauntered on, to Brookstone or somewhere. My sister said to me, "I'm having this cake." She bought a piece and sat down to eat it right then and there. I walked up to my husband, he inquired where she was, and when I told him, he was stunned that she would actually just stop in the middle of shopping to eat cake! LOL! He still tells that story.

sacha
06-03-2013, 08:00 PM
Hey we aren't all (were) emotional eaters.... I just liked eating food too much. I just enjoyed it. Nothing to do with happy or sad, it just tastes delicious and I want more :(

Tomi
06-04-2013, 09:34 PM
A friend of mine recently lost weight, and described her plan to me like this - "I watched what skinny people ate (or didn't eat, as it turned out) and copied them." I just love that.

kaplods
06-04-2013, 10:33 PM
A friend of mine recently lost weight, and described her plan to me like this - "I watched what skinny people ate (or didn't eat, as it turned out) and copied them." I just love that.

This could go very badly if you copy the wrong skinny people. I know I would personally be screwed if I copied the diets of my thin family members. As a child I didn't understand that metabolisms differ, I just knew that it wasn't fair that I couldn't eat the types and quantities of food that others in the family could.

I remember when I was in kindergarten a lady at the supermarket started ranting at my mother, because I was fat and my baby brother was so thin (underweight). She thought my mom was neglecting my brother and she actually told my mother that she needed to feed my brother the food she was feeding me (not knowing that even at 3, he was eating more than I).

I started crying, because I thought my mother was going to stop feeding me (I already was being encouraged to eat less and my brother encouraged to eat more).

BTW, my brother's hummingbird metabolism did eventually slow down, but even at 45, he has a physique and diet most men would kill for.

He and I are adopted ( and not bio-related). Our younger sisters (parents' bio-kids), have diets and weights that more closely resemble those of our parents (one taking after Mom and her side of the family, and the other taking after Dad and his mother's side of the family).

shcirerf
06-05-2013, 12:52 AM
The conclusion I have come to about normal is! We, as individuals need to find our own "normal", whatever that may be.:D

I had a tuna sandwich, on whole grain, with olive oil mayo for breakfast yesterday.

Sounded good, enjoyed it and was satisfied and happy!:D:D

Skinnyminnie Wannabe
06-05-2013, 01:39 AM
Hey we aren't all (were) emotional eaters.... I just liked eating food too much. I just enjoyed it. Nothing to do with happy or sad, it just tastes delicious and I want more :(

Good point. :yes: I remember the era of every overeating behavior (especially in women) being about some kind of codependency or deep dark emotional issues. Some is just metabolism or brain chemistry. Dopamine receptors or something.:dunno:

Several of the posts I could relate to about the husband who got grumpy yet wouldn't go eat. I have done stuff like this - my guess is that a person gets busy and ignores the brain's hunger signal and then the hunger signal turns off.

Sometimes, ironically enough, I do this while grocery shopping because I'm doing that last on a bunch of errands so frozen foods don't melt, and I'm wanting to hurry up and get it done. And I'll be aware that I'm shopping on an empty stomach and don't want to make bad selections or overbuy - which knowledge only makes me more indecisive! :?::?::?: There's a certain point when I can't make any decision, it's like my brain's running on fumes and I have to wrap it up and get out of the store. :dizzy:

My mom was Type 1 diabetic and if her blood sugar was low she could be pretty grumpy - and I'm the same way - I have insulin resistance but am not diabetic, trying not to become diabetic.

Tomi
06-08-2013, 01:24 PM
This could go very badly if you copy the wrong skinny people. I know I would personally be screwed if I copied the diets of my thin family members. As a child I didn't understand that metabolisms differ, I just knew that it wasn't fair that I couldn't eat the types and quantities of food that others in the family could.

I remember when I was in kindergarten a lady at the supermarket started ranting at my mother, because I was fat and my baby brother was so thin (underweight). She thought my mom was neglecting my brother and she actually told my mother that she needed to feed my brother the food she was feeding me (not knowing that even at 3, he was eating more than I).

I started crying, because I thought my mother was going to stop feeding me (I already was being encouraged to eat less and my brother encouraged to eat more).

BTW, my brother's hummingbird metabolism did eventually slow down, but even at 45, he has a physique and diet most men would kill for.

He and I are adopted ( and not bio-related). Our younger sisters (parents' bio-kids), have diets and weights that more closely resemble those of our parents (one taking after Mom and her side of the family, and the other taking after Dad and his mother's side of the family).

I definitely believe genetics plays a big role in what our body shape and metabolisms are. Almost all the women in my family gain weight and become rounder and rounder apple shapes as they grow older. It's happening to me too, in my forties, and I am not thrilled. Trying to get a handle on my diet to stop fate!

nelie
06-09-2013, 07:49 PM
My husband is super skinny and one thing that frustrates me is him eating chips and salsa before dinner. I guess he needs the extra calories so it is ok but I wouldn't eat before a meal or otherwise I'd ruin my appetite. I'm not perfect but I can keep treats in the house for days before touching them.

pixie3208
06-09-2013, 09:03 PM
I know I do not eat normally at all. I have to change that. I will be hungry every few hours and if I dont eat then I get shaky and sweat and feel like passing out. My fiance on the other hand will go alllll day without eating cause he is not hungry and then will have one serving at dinner and be full. Or have a sandwhich for lunch and a small dinner and be done. NOT ME! Its crazy