General Diet Plans and Questions - advice for the future based on this food log?




Alyssa Autopsy
05-19-2013, 10:35 PM
i'm looking into going partially Paleo, and i tried to do it today just to see how hard it is. i figured i would post this food log and ask for feedback. i did not count the calories so i have no idea what sort of calories i took in, but i'm sure it's not too high.




TODAY'S TRY-IT-ON TRACKING
Breakfast: 2 cups coffee, with 1/2 tsp agave nectar and a splash of creamer for each, 1 egg over easy, 1 slice lo-sodium bacon.
Snack: 1 Orange, Apple Juice (the juice has carbs in it, but I figured since it was from fruit juice with no sugar or anything added, it would be okay, plus i'm only having a few sips as opposed to the whole bottle)
Lunch: salad with lettuce, cucumber, carrot, broccoli, cauliflower, olives, and light ranch dressing; handful cashews
Snack: 3 pieces dark chocolate with caramel, handful blueberries
Dinner: Tuna with olive oil mayo
Before-Bed Snack: 1 scrambled egg with 1/4 slice cheese, 2 slices lo-sodium bacon

Notes: Didn't think to check the carbs on JUICE, but i only had a few mouthfuls. also didn't know what to eat before bed, so i asked le boyfriend what HE wanted, and he wanted eggs and bacon, so that's what i decided to have, too. I am going to eat normally (though i will try not to inhale potato chips or sandwiches) this week, but will be planning a shopping list for next weekend to go low carb. i am not cutting out completely, i'll still eat my apples, and my fiber one brownies don't have many carbs, but i'm going to make a conscious effort to watch the carbs.


Alyssa Autopsy
05-20-2013, 12:22 AM
i calculated the calories
a good 500 under what i should be eating
yet i can't stand the thought of eating more
i got completely full up after each meal

geoblewis
05-20-2013, 12:57 AM
Not sure what sort of feedback you're looking for. But it is my experience that when I increased the protein and cut out the refined/processed carbs (and for me, that included cutting fruit juice), I didn'tget as hungry. Also have to be careful to not overeat protein because I do experience a glycemic effect when I do that. If still hungry, I increase vegetables and healthy fats. Even just an ounce of raw almonds helps me.

Good luck!


Wannabeskinny
05-20-2013, 08:15 AM
i'm looking into going partially Paleo, and i tried to do it today just to see how hard it is. i figured i would post this food log and ask for feedback. i did not count the calories so i have no idea what sort of calories i took in, but i'm sure it's not too high.




TODAY'S TRY-IT-ON TRACKING
Breakfast: 2 cups coffee, with 1/2 tsp agave nectar and a splash of creamer for each, 1 egg over easy, 1 slice lo-sodium bacon.
Snack: 1 Orange, Apple Juice (the juice has carbs in it, but I figured since it was from fruit juice with no sugar or anything added, it would be okay, plus i'm only having a few sips as opposed to the whole bottle)
Lunch: salad with lettuce, cucumber, carrot, broccoli, cauliflower, olives, and light ranch dressing; handful cashews
Snack: 3 pieces dark chocolate with caramel, handful blueberries
Dinner: Tuna with olive oil mayo
Before-Bed Snack: 1 scrambled egg with 1/4 slice cheese, 2 slices lo-sodium bacon

Notes: Didn't think to check the carbs on JUICE, but i only had a few mouthfuls. also didn't know what to eat before bed, so i asked le boyfriend what HE wanted, and he wanted eggs and bacon, so that's what i decided to have, too. I am going to eat normally (though i will try not to inhale potato chips or sandwiches) this week, but will be planning a shopping list for next weekend to go low carb. i am not cutting out completely, i'll still eat my apples, and my fiber one brownies don't have many carbs, but i'm going to make a conscious effort to watch the carbs.

I always hate judging other people's food choices because I'm nowhere near perfect myself. That said, here's my thoughts on this.

Coffee - try to learn to take it without sweeteners. It takes time to adjust to the flavor but it's so much better for you in the long run.

Fruit juice - "but it's fruit!!" is the standard misconception that it's actually good for you. It's really not. Fruit juice contains a lot a lot a lot of sugar in it but without the real benefits of fruit which is FIBER. Eat your fruit, don't drink it. I don't even let my child drink fruit juice.

Salad - you could stand to put a little more in that salad that is substantial. Try some avocado, a little grilled chicken, a handful of black beans, some toasted sunflower seeds. It will make it more yummy and more balanced, you do need some protein. And skip the "lite dressing" which is just another word for processed food. Learn to love real ingredients like olive oil and vinegar. Splash in a little dijon mustard into your dressing, try out some balsamic vinegar, but make it yourself. Anything that comes in a bottle is full of sugar, I'm willing to bet on it, especially if it is labeled low-fat or lite.

Chocolate with caramel - dark chocolate can be a real treat. But caramel is added sugar, it's just sugar with butter in it. And if you can find satisfaction with one piece that's all you need. Dark chocolate can be good for you, but if it comes with the added sugar then what's the point?

Tuna with olive oil mayo - in what? In a bowl just by itself? Missed chance for veggies or whole grain bread. Not that I eat a lot of bread myself but you could wrap it in a lettuce leaf and eat it like a taco, or use it as a dip for celery or whole wheat pita chips.

Before-bed snack..... don't know what to say about that, it seems like an obvious no-no to me. Who needs energy for sleeping? Nobody. I try to stop eating by 7pm.

So basically, you're eating a few too many processed foods which are loaded with ingredients your body does not need that become quite addictive. You could use a few healthy legumes in your diet and some lean protein which will keep you fuller for longer. Try to get in the habit of reading the labels and eating more fresh perishable food and less packaged food. And I can pinpoint several cases of added sugar in your diet (in your coffee, in your salad dressing, in juice, in your snack, and in the olive oil mayo). In fact, the only meal you've had that does not contain sugar is your bedtime snack..... unless you're cooking it in butter spread which in that case all bets are off.

Some things you could add are hummus, low fat yogurt, almonds, brown rice cakes, kale chips, oatmeal.

Novus
05-20-2013, 08:38 AM
Wannabeskinny is spot on with all her observations, imo. Too many processed foods, too much sugar, and a serious lack of protein.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-20-2013, 09:00 AM
thanks guys. very informative.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-20-2013, 10:23 AM
I always hate judging other people's food choices because I'm nowhere near perfect myself. That said, here's my thoughts on this.

Coffee - try to learn to take it without sweeteners. It takes time to adjust to the flavor but it's so much better for you in the long run.

Fruit juice - "but it's fruit!!" is the standard misconception that it's actually good for you. It's really not. Fruit juice contains a lot a lot a lot of sugar in it but without the real benefits of fruit which is FIBER. Eat your fruit, don't drink it. I don't even let my child drink fruit juice.

Salad - you could stand to put a little more in that salad that is substantial. Try some avocado, a little grilled chicken, a handful of black beans, some toasted sunflower seeds. It will make it more yummy and more balanced, you do need some protein. And skip the "lite dressing" which is just another word for processed food. Learn to love real ingredients like olive oil and vinegar. Splash in a little dijon mustard into your dressing, try out some balsamic vinegar, but make it yourself. Anything that comes in a bottle is full of sugar, I'm willing to bet on it, especially if it is labeled low-fat or lite.

Chocolate with caramel - dark chocolate can be a real treat. But caramel is added sugar, it's just sugar with butter in it. And if you can find satisfaction with one piece that's all you need. Dark chocolate can be good for you, but if it comes with the added sugar then what's the point?

Tuna with olive oil mayo - in what? In a bowl just by itself? Missed chance for veggies or whole grain bread. Not that I eat a lot of bread myself but you could wrap it in a lettuce leaf and eat it like a taco, or use it as a dip for celery or whole wheat pita chips.

Before-bed snack..... don't know what to say about that, it seems like an obvious no-no to me. Who needs energy for sleeping? Nobody. I try to stop eating by 7pm.

So basically, you're eating a few too many processed foods which are loaded with ingredients your body does not need that become quite addictive. You could use a few healthy legumes in your diet and some lean protein which will keep you fuller for longer. Try to get in the habit of reading the labels and eating more fresh perishable food and less packaged food. And I can pinpoint several cases of added sugar in your diet (in your coffee, in your salad dressing, in juice, in your snack, and in the olive oil mayo). In fact, the only meal you've had that does not contain sugar is your bedtime snack..... unless you're cooking it in butter spread which in that case all bets are off.

Some things you could add are hummus, low fat yogurt, almonds, brown rice cakes, kale chips, oatmeal.thanks for the input, just wanted to say i didn't use agave nectar today in my coffee, but my creamer does have sugar in it. black coffee is an acquired taste, but if i can get myself to acquire it i certainly will

merilung
05-20-2013, 05:45 PM
thanks for the input, just wanted to say i didn't use agave nectar today in my coffee, but my creamer does have sugar in it. black coffee is an acquired taste, but if i can get myself to acquire it i certainly will

You don't have to drink your coffee black, especially if you're habitually coming in under calories as-is. Coconut milk is a suitable paleo creamer, and half and half, heavy cream, or whole milk are good primal choices if you include some dairy in your diet. Either way, I'd ditch the sweetened creamer.

Wannabeskinny
05-20-2013, 05:51 PM
thanks for the input, just wanted to say i didn't use agave nectar today in my coffee, but my creamer does have sugar in it. black coffee is an acquired taste, but if i can get myself to acquire it i certainly will

Girl you got sweetened creamer too???? I give up :dizzy:

Alyssa Autopsy
05-20-2013, 09:01 PM
Girl you got sweetened creamer too???? I give up :dizzy:

why give up? i was told to do milk and honey instead, so once im done with my creamer i'll switch to that. i need help finding out what kind of stuff i need to cut out, so yeah.

luckymommy
05-20-2013, 09:06 PM
Girl you got sweetened creamer too???? I give up :dizzy:

I'm sure you meant this in jest, but really, that's why we're all here....to support one another and offer advice. :hug:

merilung
05-20-2013, 09:10 PM
why give up? i was told to do milk and honey instead, so once im done with my creamer i'll switch to that. i need help finding out what kind of stuff i need to cut out, so yeah.

I think she was joking around :)

Honey is still sugar, just FYI. If you're trying to go as low-sugar as possible I'd try to learn to drink coffee with milk or cream and no sweetener of any kind - you could cut down a bit at a time if you need to, though I find it easier to stop all at once.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-20-2013, 10:01 PM
I think she was joking around :)

Honey is still sugar, just FYI. If you're trying to go as low-sugar as possible I'd try to learn to drink coffee with milk or cream and no sweetener of any kind - you could cut down a bit at a time if you need to, though I find it easier to stop all at once.

i know, but honey is actually good for you even though it's sugar. and if i can afford to, i will be buying vanilla flavored coffee so all i need to do is add a bit of milk because it has a flavor. but until i can get gourmet coffee (i've still got a big container, i got it because it was on sale) i'm going to just try not to go totally overboard.


also sorry to the person joking, i don't do well with joking, online or off, i have a hard time understanding sarcasm unless you're like "gurrrrrrrrrl u got SWEETENED creamer!? gurl i totes give up~ ;)" in other words, very obvious. it's part of Asperger's.

kaplods
05-20-2013, 10:32 PM
In my experience and as advised in many of Paleo resources, for weight loss, even paleo sources of concentrated carbs need to be avoided or drastically limited. That means honey, maple syrup, agave nectar, non-berry fruit, all fruit juice, dried fruits, sweet potato.... these should be avoided unless you're maintaining a desired weight and working out fairly intensely or if you're needing to gain weight. High fat foods also need to be used in moderation (nuts, coconut milk...)

When trying to lose weight, he biggest risk with these carb-sources is their effect on hunger and blood sugar (causing both to rise).

Fruit juice really isn't much better than kool-aid, as already mentioned, all the hunger-satisfying and blood-sugar stabilizing fiber is removed, leaving essentially sugar water and a few vitamins and maybe some antioxidants.

For weight loss, fiber is your friend, giving you more to eat, better blood sugar control, and preventing constipation.

Agave nectar isn't a paleo food. Nectar is a misnomer, as it's not simply harvested from the agave plant, it's made much like high fructose corn syrup and should be called, "high fructose agave syrup."

Personally, can't lose weight without also counting calories when I eat significant amounts of calorically dense foods, whether they're paleo or not. High sugar foods with the fiber and/or water removed (agave nectar, fruit juice, dried fruit) are paleo "candy." Probably fine when you're active and at goal weight, but not conducive to weight loss or hunger control.

I wonder whether calorie counting, or an exchange plan might fit your needs better than paleo, because those plans are more flexible and the plans are easier to learn and follow.

The problem with paleo, is that there are a lot of bad-paleo-diets out there. If you don't have a firm understanding of nutrition and blood sugar-control, you can't tell the good paleo advice from the bad.

Exchanges and calorie counting are simpler. Personally, I'd recommend a high protein or moderate carb exchange plan. Exchange plans have calorie-counting and balanced nutrition somewhat built in. You eat so many servings of veggies, so many fruit sevings, dairy, fat, protein, grain/starch.

And the best part of exchange plans is that they can be adapted easily to almost any style of eating. For example when I first transitioned to paleo, I continued to use my exchange plan, I just used paleo principles to select the foods I used to satisfy my plan's requirements.

kaplods
05-20-2013, 10:53 PM
i know, but honey is actually good for you even though it's sugar. and if i can afford to, i will be buying vanilla flavored coffee so all i need to do is add a bit of milk because it has a flavor. but until i can get gourmet coffee (i've still got a big container, i got it because it was on sale) i'm going to just try not to go totally overboard.


also sorry to the person joking, i don't do well with joking, online or off, i have a hard time understanding sarcasm unless you're like "gurrrrrrrrrl u got SWEETENED creamer!? gurl i totes give up~ ;)" in other words, very obvious. it's part of Asperger's.

No honey really isn't good for you, not if you need to lose a significant amount of weight. It's caveman junk food, a "treat" that required work and bravery to harvest, and even so more than a fingerful a couple times a year was probably more than most people ever had.

Honey, dried fruit, fruit juice, and high sugar foods are not very paleo. Modern farming has bred sugar and starch into our foods and fiber out. To eat a semi-paleo diet you have to minimize sugar and maximize fiber. Wild, paleo fruits and vegetables were not very sweet, so to try to eat a paleo-like diet you need to be very careful with sweets of all types, especially if you're not eating at least 8 full servings of WHOLE low-calorie vegetables (and probably more like 10 to 12). Fruit sevings probably of no more than 3 daily (maybe less if not berries or citrus)

The paleo food pyramid would probably look loke this

Sweets and nuts (eat rarely if at all, esp if you need to lose) - honey, dried fruit, most fruit (juice never, it wastes too much and paleo folks weren't wasteful)

Nuts and starchy tubers like parsnips and sweet potato. Occasionally, especially if you're not very active.

Berries and low cal fruits, such as citrus fruits

Fat, meat and fish ( in moderate amounts when you can catch it - exercise to "earn it")

Low-sugar vegetables, herbs, leaves, grasses (probably the majority of the diet, most of the year). For weight loss, this is probably the only "eat as much as you want" category. Should take up most of your plate.

Wannabeskinny
05-21-2013, 08:10 AM
i know, but honey is actually good for you even though it's sugar. and if i can afford to, i will be buying vanilla flavored coffee so all i need to do is add a bit of milk because it has a flavor. but until i can get gourmet coffee (i've still got a big container, i got it because it was on sale) i'm going to just try not to go totally overboard.


also sorry to the person joking, i don't do well with joking, online or off, i have a hard time understanding sarcasm unless you're like "gurrrrrrrrrl u got SWEETENED creamer!? gurl i totes give up~ ;)" in other words, very obvious. it's part of Asperger's.

It was a joke, but honestly it did catch me off guard. Being healthy and sweetened creamers don't go hand in hand. I think you're just fooling yourself about honey being good for you, when in fact its predominant quality is to be sweet. I think you're making all kinds of excuses to keep sugar in your life, it permeates every meal you eat and sooner or later you'll learn that. I learned it later in life unfortunately, and I've fought my sugar addiction ever since. You're still friends with sugar and you seem very young so this probably doesn't make much sense to you now - who knows when you'll be open to learning the truth about sugar. I hope for your sake it's sooner than I learned it. I posted a video in your paelo thread, did you watch it?

Furthermore, it makes me sad that our supermarkets are chalk full of foods that are pure sugar and are disguised as "healthy." If someone is young, uneducated about nutrition, and has a bit of a sweet tooth falls prey to it and this is how we've ended up with an epidemic.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-21-2013, 12:12 PM
thanks guys <3 keep the info coming, i'm listening!

how can agave nectar be made from high fructose if it's organic? i didn't think organic could HAVE high fructose.

Daki
05-21-2013, 01:06 PM
High fructose is not an ingredient. This is taken straight from WebMD about agave "Agave nectar or syrup is as high as 90% concentrated fructose (a simple sugar that occurs naturally in fruit), and the rest glucose. But the agave you can buy ranges from 90% to as little as 55% fructose (similar to high-fructose corn syrup), depending on the processing, says Roger Clemens"

Basically the processing takes anything natural from it. They can still call it natural because there are no rules about what constitutes something as being natural. So the original ingredients might be "all natural" but the end result is anything but.

Other than that I don't have anything else to add that someone else didn't say already. I agree with them about the honey and fruit juice wholeheartedly.

kaplods
05-21-2013, 01:16 PM
thanks guys <3 keep the info coming, i'm listening!

how can agave nectar be made from high fructose if it's organic? i didn't think organic could HAVE high fructose.

This is WHY you need to learn about nutrition. Organic means only how the plant is grown (without artificial chemical pesticides). You can grow organic corn and turn it into high fructose corn syrup.

Fructose is a natural type of sugar. Another name for fructose is fruit sugar. Eating intense, concentrated sources of sugar is bad for health, regardless of where the sugars come from. Natural sugars (from honey, fruit...) aren't much (if any) better for you than processed sugars - and even processed sugar "comes from" natural, even organic sources. Sugar is never "made" it all comes from natural sources. Processing of corn or agave concentrates the sugar by removing everything in the plant except for the sugars.

Agave syrup isn't "made from" high fructose anything, the fructose is naturally in the plant and processing concentrates those sugars (mostly fructose) by removing anything from the plant that isn't sugar which is the same process that corn goes through to become high fructose corn syrup.

All sugars, ALL SUGARS, contribute to the sugar overdose that contributes to so many health problems including obesity, diabetes, insulin resistance, hypoglycemia, heart disease, autoimmune diseases.

If you replace all of your processed sugar with "healthy" sources of sugar like honey and fruit, you will not improve your health much, and probably won't lose much if any weight.

Starch isn't much better, because the body breaks down starches INTO sugar.


To simplify paleo as much as possible:

Eat lots and lots of low calorie vegetables, as much as you want
Eat moderate amounts of meat, fish, and eggs
Eat small amounts of nuts seeds, avocado, coconut oil, butter
Eat small amounts of berries and citrus fruits
Eat even smaller amounts of all other fruits
Eat nothing else, and if the weight isn't coming off, or stops at some point look at what you're eating and cut out the highest calorie foods you're eating - and start with the sugars first - the fruit.

When you reach a healthy weight, if you're exercising regularly, you may be able to eat more fruit and perhaps the occasional potato (ideally sweet potato).

Some folks on paleo add small amounts of non-paleo and semi-paleo foods, but to do this successfully, you need to understand nutrition and biochemistry at a level you do not. Stick to basic foods that a caveman would instantly recognize immediately as food from a distance (without tasting or smelling). Stick to foods you could obtain in the forest yourself, ideally in the form you would find them (for example fruits would be fresh and whole, nuts would be in the shell, unsalted).

Creamer doesn't pass this test - it looks like dust.

Agave nectar doesn't pass this test, because the plant has to be highly processed to create the syrup. The fiber (the good stuff) is all removed.

Maple syrup doesn't pass the test either, because like agave it has to be boiled and boiled and boiled to become syrup.

Honey doesn't even pass the test, because it also is processed, even if the procesd is just squeezing and straining out the solids (honey comb, beeswax, bees, and bee larvae). Cavemen would have chewed on the honeycomb, probably eating the wax, bees, and bee larvae within the honeycomb.

The best paleo advice I ever found in a paleo book was to imagine the work a caveman would have done to get a type of food, and try to do it before eating that food.

Fishing and gathering fruits and vegetables would require the least amount of work, but still quite a fair amount of walking. Eat the most of these and do a lot of walking.

Meat is a lot more work, and dangerous to boot, because meat fights back. If you want to eat meat, then you need to run and fight (aerobic exercise).

This advice isn't always practical, and I don't follow it myself as much as I should, but it does remind me to eat most from the foods that would be easiest to acquire if I had to get them directly from nature.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-21-2013, 10:09 PM
This is WHY you need to learn about nutrition. Organic means only how the plant is grown (without artificial chemical pesticides). You can grow organic corn and turn it into high fructose corn syrup.

Fructose is a natural type of sugar. Another name for fructose is fruit sugar. Eating intense, concentrated sources of sugar is bad for health, regardless of where the sugars come from. Natural sugars (from honey, fruit...) aren't much (if any) better for you than processed sugars - and even processed sugar "comes from" natural, even organic sources. Sugar is never "made" it all comes from natural sources. Processing of corn or agave concentrates the sugar by removing everything in the plant except for the sugars.

Agave syrup isn't "made from" high fructose anything, the fructose is naturally in the plant and processing concentrates those sugars (mostly fructose) by removing anything from the plant that isn't sugar which is the same process that corn goes through to become high fructose corn syrup.

All sugars, ALL SUGARS, contribute to the sugar overdose that contributes to so many health problems including obesity, diabetes, insulin resistance, hypoglycemia, heart disease, autoimmune diseases.

If you replace all of your processed sugar with "healthy" sources of sugar like honey and fruit, you will not improve your health much, and probably won't lose much if any weight.

Starch isn't much better, because the body breaks down starches INTO sugar.


To simplify paleo as much as possible:

Eat lots and lots of low calorie vegetables, as much as you want
Eat moderate amounts of meat, fish, and eggs
Eat small amounts of nuts seeds, avocado, coconut oil, butter
Eat small amounts of berries and citrus fruits
Eat even smaller amounts of all other fruits
Eat nothing else, and if the weight isn't coming off, or stops at some point look at what you're eating and cut out the highest calorie foods you're eating - and start with the sugars first - the fruit.

When you reach a healthy weight, if you're exercising regularly, you may be able to eat more fruit and perhaps the occasional potato (ideally sweet potato).

Some folks on paleo add small amounts of non-paleo and semi-paleo foods, but to do this successfully, you need to understand nutrition and biochemistry at a level you do not. Stick to basic foods that a caveman would instantly recognize immediately as food from a distance (without tasting or smelling). Stick to foods you could obtain in the forest yourself, ideally in the form you would find them (for example fruits would be fresh and whole, nuts would be in the shell, unsalted).

Creamer doesn't pass this test - it looks like dust.

Agave nectar doesn't pass this test, because the plant has to be highly processed to create the syrup. The fiber (the good stuff) is all removed.

Maple syrup doesn't pass the test either, because like agave it has to be boiled and boiled and boiled to become syrup.

Honey doesn't even pass the test, because it also is processed, even if the procesd is just squeezing and straining out the solids (honey comb, beeswax, bees, and bee larvae). Cavemen would have chewed on the honeycomb, probably eating the wax, bees, and bee larvae within the honeycomb.

The best paleo advice I ever found in a paleo book was to imagine the work a caveman would have done to get a type of food, and try to do it before eating that food.

Fishing and gathering fruits and vegetables would require the least amount of work, but still quite a fair amount of walking. Eat the most of these and do a lot of walking.

Meat is a lot more work, and dangerous to boot, because meat fights back. If you want to eat meat, then you need to run and fight (aerobic exercise).

This advice isn't always practical, and I don't follow it myself as much as I should, but it does remind me to eat most from the foods that would be easiest to acquire if I had to get them directly from nature.

do you have any suggestions on learning more about nutrition? i've been being given some nice links and have been reading them all, but i DO need more of an understanding of nutrition, which is why i decided to take a week to study and discuss it before actually trying it.

and once im done with the creamer and coffee i have, i'm going to start using my almond milk instead. it's not sweetened (i hate sweetened milk) so i'll have to get used to the coffee being more bitter than usual, but i bet i can get used to it within a week or two.

as for the running, i have physical issues that make that impossible, but i'm walking and biking at least 4 times a week. and i am also doing some simple muscle-building exercises, because i'm not all about losing weight. i'd like to lose weight, but really my goal is for health. i want to be healthy. and im sure if my body is getting properly what it needs, not only will i feel better but i'll lose weight too. i'm not even trying to get back to 105 pounds like i was just a few years ago, but i'd at least like to be wearing a size 12 instead of a size 16. and i quite like my new curves when i dress for them properly, i'd be disappointed to lose my curves by losing too much. i really just wanna lose 30 more pounds, then i'll be happy. i'll still be quite a bit overweight, but hopefully at 150 i'll feel better than i do now at 180.

kaplods
05-21-2013, 11:23 PM
I can't run either, that wasn't my point. My point was to think about how hard you would have to work to get the food you're eating if there were no grocery stores, farms or chemistry labs. Would it even be possible.

My point was that for those of us who are overweight and unable to do much exercise, we should focus on the paleo foods that would be easiest to gather, catch.... vegetables, berries, fish, poultry... We should eat less of the foods that would have required a lot of time, strength and work (climbing, running, fighting, pounding...).


As to where you can find out about nutrition, probably the best place to start is your local library. You can ask the librarian for help, or look for books in the "for dummies" or "idiot's guide" series. These books aren't meant for dummies or idiots, they just are written in an easy to read format. The everything guide books are also good.

I'd recommend these books

Living Paleo for Dummies
The Complete Idiot's Guide to Eating Paleo
Eating Clean for Dummies
The Low Carb Bible, by Elizabeth Ward
Nutrition for Dummies
Nutrition for Life

If you find that these books are confusing, consider checking out books in the children's and young adults (teen) section aimed at middleschoolers and teens. Sounds stupid, I know - but I have done this and I have a master's degree in psychology. In fact, I am trying to learn to use my new sewing machine and the adult books on the subject were too technical, so I checked out some books that were written for junior high and high school age.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-22-2013, 08:23 PM
I can't run either, that wasn't my point. My point was to think about how hard you would have to work to get the food you're eating if there were no grocery stores, farms or chemistry labs. Would it even be possible.

My point was that for those of us who are overweight and unable to do much exercise, we should focus on the paleo foods that would be easiest to gather, catch.... vegetables, berries, fish, poultry... We should eat less of the foods that would have required a lot of time, strength and work (climbing, running, fighting, pounding...).


As to where you can find out about nutrition, probably the best place to start is your local library. You can ask the librarian for help, or look for books in the "for dummies" or "idiot's guide" series. These books aren't meant for dummies or idiots, they just are written in an easy to read format. The everything guide books are also good.

I'd recommend these books

Living Paleo for Dummies
The Complete Idiot's Guide to Eating Paleo
Eating Clean for Dummies
The Low Carb Bible, by Elizabeth Ward
Nutrition for Dummies
Nutrition for Life

If you find that these books are confusing, consider checking out books in the children's and young adults (teen) section aimed at middleschoolers and teens. Sounds stupid, I know - but I have done this and I have a master's degree in psychology. In fact, I am trying to learn to use my new sewing machine and the adult books on the subject were too technical, so I checked out some books that were written for junior high and high school age.
i was hoping for more online stuff, it's really hard for me to go to the library. it's miles away and it's hard to carry books back on my bike, plus i can only keep them 2 weeks, which isn't enough time to really study and absorb the information. i read Nutrition for Dummies, but i forget pretty much everything i learned. with stuff online, i can just bookmark it and look at it at my liesure.