Weight Loss Support - damnit i keep gaining weight T_T




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Alyssa Autopsy
05-16-2013, 01:16 PM
i haven't been counting my calories, but i've been eating lo-cal and small portions and not a lot of chocolate, yet i gained 8 pounds. i haven't been exercising enough (though i have been exercising) to gain that sort of muscle, and now i'm freaked out.

i've been having light breakfasts like an egg and toast (today i had butter on my toast which i haven't done in a while), lunches have been things like either a plate of steamed and lightly sauced veggies or half a sandwich and some slices of dried vegetables. dinner would be a single chicken breast with rice and veggies. snacks are granola bars or fruit or yoghurt. i still have ramen, but not often and only if i know i ate lo-cal that day and could fit it in. i also use agave nectar instead of sugar, have cut out multiple things like high fructose corn syrup and aspartame. and i always always always eat small portions. a salad and a fillet of fish fills me up. also i drink V8 and have fiber one brownies, so i'm getting good nutrients.

also its hard for me to exercise because i have heart conditions but i've been riding my bike slowly, and have been taking short walks. i feel healthier, less tired and stuff, but my weight is really bothering me. i'm on medications that make you gain weight, but i didn't think it would be this bad. i've been stuck around 180-190 pounds for months now, even while i gradually eat better and better. i just wanna get to 150, but i can't seem to get out of the 180s.

i don't know what kind of help i can get here, but i'm frustrated. i feel like i'm doing everything i can do, and failing. does anyone have any advice? and please don't tell me to exercise more, as i'm doing what i can. i've also had people tell me to eat nothing but apples and run 5 miles a day, and i find that ridiculous, so think before you give advice.


IanG
05-16-2013, 01:21 PM
No, exercise is not it. I would kill the carbs. Eat less bread (try the small low calorie ones) and get rid of the rice. I would also go sugar free - ditch the agave and the granola bars. Raw/steamed vegetables are what you need!

NorthernChick13
05-16-2013, 01:22 PM
Glad to hear you are looking for ways to keep losing, and not giving up!

I know you said you aren't counting calories, but I think you should. Sometimes we don't really know how many calories we are eating and maybe that is happening here? it'll help you get a hold on what is happening, for now :) It could also be water weight though...it might not be pounds gained!


ichoose2believe
05-16-2013, 01:33 PM
I know for me calorie counting helped a lot because for me sodium was killer. Which could account for a lot of water weight. I found that I wasn't eating as much protein as I thought I was. In the past about 70% of my calories was carbs.
BTW are drinking enough water? I know it sound a little silly but it works.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-16-2013, 01:46 PM
Guys, I can't count calories. I have an eating disorder, and counting the calories was putting me into so much stress I wanted to cut. I am taking into consideration everything that people are saying though, don't worry I actually listen to advice given to me, even though others don't recognize that all the time.

pnkrckpixikat
05-16-2013, 01:59 PM
Ramen is CRAZY high in sodium, that could be masking any loss with water retention. Could you maybe make your own version of ramen with less salt? i've never looked for recipes for this but im sure there must be some out there. Even if you aren't counting, are you measuring your food? or just eyeballing it? If you struggle with an eating disorder I know that this is probably a fine line to walk, but could you be eyeballing wrong, either over or under, sometimes too little food can cause as much of a stall as too much.

Some people are sensitive to carbs, and the meds may tie into that or cause it as well, I second trying to limit processed carbs and see if that helps.

sacha
05-16-2013, 02:01 PM
If you are truly eating low calorie and have a history of an eating disorder, is there a chance that you could be dealing with metabolic damage? Is there any way you can work with a registered dietician?

JohnP
05-16-2013, 02:19 PM
Trying to eat small portions isn't working. As a general rules, we (humans) are not good at this.

If you can't count calories you need to follow rules.

I would suggest strict paleo.

Also, while I am 99% sure you have no metabolic damage, it wouldn't hurt to go talk to a doctor.

franciejones
05-16-2013, 02:30 PM
It would seem to me a lot of carbs...

Arctic Mama
05-16-2013, 02:33 PM
It's the calories, nutrient composition of the food, or both. You must follow something - maybe try an exchange plan and control your servings? Or intermittent fasting and control your eating window? Low carb and control for high fat and low carb counts?

Something must be measured/structured if the calories aren't it. In the end it is about energy balance - though there are many confounding factors that make that much less simple, or make adherence to a weight reducing plan easier. I don't quite see how counting calories could make your eating disorder worse, though, so long as you counted meticulously on a comparably high calorie budget of say 1700-1800 per day. If the number stayed high, while you may initially be a bit obsessive about the details would it do demonstrable harm to you? Just thinking out loud, here.

Arctic Mama
05-16-2013, 02:34 PM
And I'd be chewing my arm off if I ate tht many carbs - way too much sugar and starch for my body! It can be very hard to control portions on such a processed, carb-heavy diet, so I'd look into modifying that too, if you can. I know budget is an issue for you, but you're doing your health and weight loss a disservice with overly salty noodles and glorified candy bars, which is what granola is!

ikesgirl80
05-16-2013, 02:58 PM
I agree with the high amount of carbs/calorie counting. But I understand with a eating disorder, counting and getting obssessed. May I suggest that you measure/weigh your foods, do a food journal on it's own thread, and members here could suggest, "Eat 1 less serving of carbs tomorrow." or "Add 2 servings of veggies to dinner." You could then take a suggestion each day, and apply it the next, and track your weight. You will soon learn who on here responded to food like you, and could maybe team up with them to get a plan in action.

joefla70
05-16-2013, 03:10 PM
Trying to eat small portions isn't working. As a general rules, we (humans) are not good at this.

If you can't count calories you need to follow rules.

I would suggest strict paleo.

Also, while I am 99% sure you have no metabolic damage, it wouldn't hurt to go talk to a doctor.

This is kinda what I do. I'm too lazy to count calories, so I pretty much eat paleo... and was doing so before I even knew what paleo was! However, I am not strict. I do eat things like fat free Greek yogurt and other low or non-fat milk products.

Personally, I have found when I have run into trouble, its because I deviated from my plan, and didn't realize how much until I paid closer attention to what, and how much, I was eating. When I've really examined what I was doing, and got back to basics, the weight started to come off again.

While I don't count calories, carbs, etc. and don't weigh my food, I have a rough idea of how much I am consuming in order to limit my portions. Even following a paleo diet strictly isn't going to help you lose weight if you go crazy on the portions.

Daki
05-16-2013, 04:38 PM
I think you are eating way, WAY more carbs than you realize. Just the carbs from your toast, Fiber One brownie, ramen, rice and V8 comes to about 135 carbs. This is not counting the carbs in your yogurt, half a sandwich if you have one, granola bar, fruit, agave, or your sauced veggies.

It does not sound like you eat everything you listed every day but in case you do, that's about 236 carbs (I just pick a fruit, picked a yogurt, picked a granola bar etc).

According to the Primal Blueprint carb curve, 50g-100g is said to be the "sweet spot" for weight loss. 100g-150g is considered to be weight maintenance levels of carbs. 150g-300g is called the "Insidious Weight Gain" zone.

So if you choose to believe this chart, at best you are maintaining and at worst you are eating a level of carbs that can cause weight gain. I would really find stuff with less carbs to eat.

That being said, I have the same problem with counting calories as you do. I recently switched to calorie counting because I had an idea how to not tread into dangerous territory with it. I decided that I had to have set times to eat a bunch of small "meals" and instead of getting twitchy about my calories, I'm focused on getting my carbs/fat/protein pie chart to be mostly protein and hitting nutritional marks like "carbs under 100" or "100% of the important vitamins" or "only healthy fats". Maybe you can try something like that?

Edit: Another thing I try to do is not eat anything that comes in its own bag. That has really kept me from eating a lot of processed crap even if it's low calorie.

Ija
05-16-2013, 04:49 PM
150g-300g is called the "Insidious Weight Gain" zone.

I hate to change the subject but I lost 150+ pounds in the "Insidious Weight Gain" zone. Don't believe everything you read on the internet.

As for the original topic, I have to concur with everyone else --something has to be controlled. If you can't count calories, you have to limit your calorie intake indirectly by following some other plan. Low carb/paleo plans can do that, it's how they work. I wouldn't try to eyeball it or do any intuitive eating approaches until your weight is happy and stable.

Daki
05-16-2013, 05:00 PM
I hate to change the subject but I lost 150+ pounds in the "Insidious Weight Gain" zone. Don't believe everything you read on the internet.

That is why I put the name of the zone in quotes and also said "if you choose to believe". Obviously that's not how it works for everyone. Personally? I can't lose weight to save my life if I eat over 100g of carbs every single day. So sure, you lost weight doing that and that's great but I can't. We don't know how to OP's body works so I was giving some adviced based on what worked for me.

Also, there is a HUGE difference between under 200g of carbs and eating 300g of carbs a day.

Arctic Mama
05-16-2013, 05:06 PM
I hate to change the subject but I lost 150+ pounds in the "Insidious Weight Gain" zone. Don't believe everything you read on the internet.

As for the original topic, I have to concur with everyone else --something has to be controlled. If you can't count calories, you have to limit your calorie intake indirectly by following some other plan. Low carb/paleo plans can do that, it's how they work. I wouldn't try to eyeball it or do any intuitive eating approaches until your weight is happy and stable.

That is statistically anomalous. Doesn't mean it isn't true for your body, and GREAT that you can do it! But especially down in the maintenance calorie range for a female at 135-ish pounds, 200-300 grams of carbs per day is easily 70+ percent of your daily calorie intake, and VERY few long term maintainers can eat that many carbs and stay in their target calorie range, let alone get adequate nutrition.

There is a whole spectrum of ideal human diets, depending on the body. Yours sounds to be on one end of that curve.

Ija
05-16-2013, 05:10 PM
That is statistically anomalous. Doesn't mean it isn't true for your body, and GREAT that you can do it! But especially down in the maintenance calorie range for a female at 135-ish pounds, 200-300 grams of carbs per day is easily 70+ percent of your daily calorie intake, and VERY few long term maintainers can eat that many carbs and stay in their target calorie range, let alone get adequate nutrition.

There is a whole spectrum of ideal human diets, depending on the body. Yours sounds to be on one end of that curve.

I'm not sure what statistics you're referring to, but I've spent more time on pubmed than most (I'm a researcher, it's what I do) and I haven't seen anything that would indicate there's a carb range required for weight loss. Now, getting nutrients in... that's another story. I'm not saying eating high-carb is healthy, just that if your calories are right, eating low-carb is not required (but in some cases helpful, especially for people who struggle with appetite).

Arctic Mama
05-16-2013, 05:14 PM
Pubmed is useless for large scale statistical analysis - studies, by their nature, focus on minutia that can be tested, and meta-analyses have incredibly large confounders that render them bunk. There is scant data on those who lose both large amounts of weight AND maintain it, but a diet more moderate to low in carbohydrate intake than the statistical mean for this country is one of those correlating factors.

Have fun pounding back the carbs - seriously, if it works for you go for it! - but for someone who can't count calories, that is a very easy way of controlling food quality, nutrition, and overall intake.

Ija
05-16-2013, 05:16 PM
Pubmed is useless for large scale statistical analysis - studies, by their nature, focus on minutia that can be tested, and meta-analyses have incredibly large confounders that render them bunk. There is scant data on those who lose both large amounts of weight AND maintain it, but a diet more moderate to low in carbohydrate intake than the statistical mean for this country is one of those correlating factors.

Have fun pounding back the carbs - seriously, if it works for you go for it! - but for someone who can't count calories, that is a very easy way of controlling food quality, nutrition, and overall intake.

Pubmed doesn't have large-scale studies? :?:

Also, I don't "pound" carbs. Sheesh.

And I never said low-carb wasn't useful. It can certainly be helpful, but it's the deficit that will get you weight loss.

Wow.

Arctic Mama
05-16-2013, 05:16 PM
I should caveat that I do use and enjoy the conglomeration of data on Pubmed, especially in the subject of nutrient assimilation and metabolism (gotta love the mice studies ;) ) but I've also seen it abused pretty badly - statistics is more often data manipulation than anything else, in my experience.

Arctic Mama
05-16-2013, 05:19 PM
Oh sheesh, I didn't say it didn't have large studies, but by the very nature of dietary studies (especially with self reporting) extrapolating their conclusions to a larger scale of the population must be done with much care, at the very least. And too many dietary studies are poorly controlled, have insufficient sample size, do not adequately manage secondary variables, or are observing correlative data and then claiming it to be causative in their abstracts.

Caveat emptor, was my main point.

Ija
05-16-2013, 05:24 PM
I would argue that there's more evidence for energy balance than macronutrient composition (independent of energy intake), but of course if one dismiss all the data it wouldn't matter. Out of curiosity where do you get your statistics?

fadedbluejeans
05-16-2013, 05:32 PM
Hey Alyssa, I totally understand how counting calories could be a slippery slope. Have you ever tried Noom? It's a weight loss app that helps with portion control/diet balance without counting calories. It uses a red yellow green system to qualify food choices with the goal of having your pie chart be mostly green, partly yellow and least red. It might be a tool you can use to help track your diet without getting into the number crunching that seems to add to your stress.
Good luck and keep trying.

Arctic Mama
05-16-2013, 05:36 PM
I don't disagree with energy balance, observe my initial post. That said, it is a fact that the body responds differently to different nutrients and food evokes hormonal responses in degrees, sometimes quite disparate degrees from the median, depending on the individual. Depending on whether the individual's adipose tissue is hyperplastic or hypertrophic, as a general characteristic, a person may be more or less insulin sensitive. And that should absolutely influence the food choices they make, for their own overall health as well as long term adherence.

This is one study I found very interesting. There is no way I have time for major Pubmed data trolling, so you can do that yourself if interested, but observing the response of fat tissue post weight reduction is an area that needs more study - when we're talking ability to maintain and practical strategies to achieve that, understanding the neuroendoctrine interactions post weight reduction is a critical cornerstone (in my opinion, of course).

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16222518

Arctic Mama
05-16-2013, 05:40 PM
And I have to take my daughter to piano now - apologies for the thread jack, Alyssa :)

Ija
05-16-2013, 05:41 PM
I know the literature on neuroendocrine responses very well, still, weight loss is achieved (with both high and low carb diets) due to negative energy balance.

I'm still wondering where the idea that I'm a statistical anomaly comes from.

Suzanne 3FC
05-16-2013, 05:45 PM
While that sounds like a fascinating debate, maybe it would be better for the OP to stick to the topic in this thread. You are welcome to start a new thread to discuss the merits of pubmed or debate the usefulness of carbs in a diet :)

Thanks!

freelancemomma
05-16-2013, 06:31 PM
Guys, I can't count calories. I have an eating disorder, and counting the calories was putting me into so much stress I wanted to cut. I am taking into consideration everything that people are saying though, don't worry I actually listen to advice given to me, even though others don't recognize that all the time.

If counting calories triggers obsessive thoughts or behaviours, then definitely don't count calories. That said, I think it's VERY easy to underestimate quantity, and I'm probably guilty of doing that every day. My saving grace is exercise. If you're unable to exercise you need to find simple, stress-free ways to control quantity. One thing I've done in the past is make a list of 5 core breakfasts, lunches. dinners, and snacks (including specified quantities, such as 2 cups) -- and rotate between them. (Now that I'm in maintenance I'm nowhere near that systematic or diligent.)

Freelance

freelancemomma
05-16-2013, 06:41 PM
According to the Primal Blueprint carb curve, 50g-100g is said to be the "sweet spot" for weight loss. 100g-150g is considered to be weight maintenance levels of carbs. 150g-300g is called the "Insidious Weight Gain" zone.

Just want to point out that the Primal Blueprint isn't Gospel. I've been eating high carb (about 300 g/day in maintenance, 225 g/day when losing) my whole life, and it has never stood in the way of weight loss. For me it's always been about calories. I do understand that some people find it hard to restrain themselves around carbs. (I do too, but not because they're carbs -- because they're delicious! I also have trouble restraining myself around fine cheese and seafood.) It's up to each individual to decide how to handle carbs, but as a general rule high carb is NOT incompatible with weight loss. I've never been a starch person and most of my carbs are whole grains, so I don't sweat it.

Freelance

p.s. I just read Ija's posts and totally agree with them. There is no consistent evidence from the scientific literature that reducing carbs is required to lose weight. Current government guidelines recommend up to 65% of calories in carbs. In my case, this would translate to 325 g.

Missy Krissy
05-16-2013, 07:49 PM
It's the calories, nutrient composition of the food, or both. You must follow something - maybe try an exchange plan and control your servings? Or intermittent fasting and control your eating window? Low carb and control for high fat and low carb counts?

Something must be measured/structured if the calories aren't it. In the end it is about energy balance - though there are many confounding factors that make that much less simple, or make adherence to a weight reducing plan easier. I don't quite see how counting calories could make your eating disorder worse, though, so long as you counted meticulously on a comparably high calorie budget of say 1700-1800 per day. If the number stayed high, while you may initially be a bit obsessive about the details would it do demonstrable harm to you? Just thinking out loud, here.

Counting calories meticulously is exactly what can make an eating disorder worse! It's being meticulous, calculating and obsessing over everything, striving for perfect control that makes it worse.

Alyssa, have you checked out the Chicks in Control boards?

Also, I do agree that a low carb plan or something along those lines might work best. It sounds like you're eating a lot of starchy food. I understand that you're struggling with your budget, and starches are often the least expensive foods, but they really aren't that helpful for weight loss. I can hear your frustration, it seems like the cards are stacked against you! What with limited funds, health problems making exercise difficult, and an eating disorder, I'm sure you've been struggling a lot. I'm glad you posted though, I was wondering why I haven't seen you around!

I agree with what JohnP suggested. Maybe try a strictly paleo plan? Or primal? Or South Beach? Something like that where you aren't keeping track of numbers might be very beneficial for you. It might put a strain on your wallet, but a sacrifice has to be made somewhere.

Garnet2727
05-16-2013, 08:17 PM
Hey Alyssa, I totally understand how counting calories could be a slippery slope. Have you ever tried Noom? It's a weight loss app that helps with portion control/diet balance without counting calories. It uses a red yellow green system to qualify food choices with the goal of having your pie chart be mostly green, partly yellow and least red. It might be a tool you can use to help track your diet without getting into the number crunching that seems to add to your stress.
Good luck and keep trying.

Not to jack this thread but I'm going to check this out for myself! Alyssa, I do wonder if something like this might work for you.

Arctic Mama
05-16-2013, 09:14 PM
Krissy - what I was trying to say is that in my experience the OCD tendencies can capitalize on any plan, and often pop up. So why would calorie counting kick it up more so than an exchange plan or carb limiting, which all involve parameters to manage as well? I've seen disorders behavior in ALL those areas, and it seems managing that might not need to involve total avoidance of anything that could trigger the OCD, but using other methods like accountability to another or a very high calorie level to keep the physical consequences to a minimum. Being obsessive about the half carb in a tbsp of heavy whipping cream and calculating your Paleo meals to meet _________ macro and ________ vit/min target, or being concerned about how 'pure' one's food is sourced or adheres to XYZ plan... This can and does frequently pop up with the dieting population, and not more so with one kind of plan than another, that I've seen. Sometimes striving for something like intuitive eating can even make it worse, as the lack of parameters and potential difficulty in observing physical feedback cues can cause its own anxiety and security seeking.

So given that energy deficit of some degree must be achieved to lose weight, and ideally nutritionally dense foods are sought instead of processed, packaged junk, it just seems like calorie counting and working to meet a minimum number and land inside a 100 calorie range above that amount, is wise. You can obsess over anything if that tendency is there and it's not well controlled on the psychological level, so all other things being equal and any diet being prone to abuse, I still can't see why calorie counting would be more dangerous for a trigger than any other eating plan.

I'm also willing to accept that it 'just is', for some intangible reason it may be a bigger trigger to a person than another eating plan. But I've seen too many obsessive weight watchers, south beachers, IPers, and the like to think that just choosing a non-calorie based plan is enough to circumvent the disordered eating tendency. Again, I may totally be wrong here, but that was really what my thoughts were in making that statement :)

Alyssa Autopsy
05-17-2013, 02:10 PM
Counting calories meticulously is exactly what can make an eating disorder worse! It's being meticulous, calculating and obsessing over everything, striving for perfect control that makes it worse.

Alyssa, have you checked out the Chicks in Control boards?

Also, I do agree that a low carb plan or something along those lines might work best. It sounds like you're eating a lot of starchy food. I understand that you're struggling with your budget, and starches are often the least expensive foods, but they really aren't that helpful for weight loss. I can hear your frustration, it seems like the cards are stacked against you! What with limited funds, health problems making exercise difficult, and an eating disorder, I'm sure you've been struggling a lot. I'm glad you posted though, I was wondering why I haven't seen you around!

I agree with what JohnP suggested. Maybe try a strictly paleo plan? Or primal? Or South Beach? Something like that where you aren't keeping track of numbers might be very beneficial for you. It might put a strain on your wallet, but a sacrifice has to be made somewhere.i have, but my posts get removed because i post such triggering stuff.

i've looked into the paleo diet, and idk if i can do that. i'll end up eating nothing but chicken and salad and apples with that diet, which would mean a LOT of eating to stay at a HEALTHY calorie deficit (i'm having issues going over 1200 unless i eat crap to supplement all my lo-cal foods) and i have issues eating due to no appetite. most of the time, just smelling food makes me feel physically ill.

as for the strain on my wallet, i ONLY have $200 a month.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-17-2013, 02:12 PM
Ramen is CRAZY high in sodium, that could be masking any loss with water retention. Could you maybe make your own version of ramen with less salt? i've never looked for recipes for this but im sure there must be some out there. Even if you aren't counting, are you measuring your food? or just eyeballing it? If you struggle with an eating disorder I know that this is probably a fine line to walk, but could you be eyeballing wrong, either over or under, sometimes too little food can cause as much of a stall as too much.

Some people are sensitive to carbs, and the meds may tie into that or cause it as well, I second trying to limit processed carbs and see if that helps.i only use half the packet of seasoning when i make it. i'm eating until i'm full, which isn't much. as i said, a single salad and a single fish fillet has me full for hours. i can eat 120 calories of oatmeal for breakfast, and feel full for HOURS. and sometimes i feel full even when there's nothing in me. my stomach will growl, i'll try to eat, and it is gross. the taste is off, swallowing is difficult, every chew makes me feel ill. it's not like that ALL the time, usuyally i can force myself to eat, but on bad days it's hard for me to even eat one meal a day.

i need help figuring out the carbs stuff

Alyssa Autopsy
05-17-2013, 02:14 PM
If you are truly eating low calorie and have a history of an eating disorder, is there a chance that you could be dealing with metabolic damage? Is there any way you can work with a registered dietician?it's possible, as i alternated between starving, binge purging, and binging for -8- years. but i'm also on birth control and medication, both of which have the side effects of weight gain.

also i can't afford a dietician YET. my phone contract is running out in like a month, and i'm gonna use the money i save from not having a phone plan to get insurance. i also have physical issues like heart problems and scoliosis and mental illnesses so i have a lot of stuff i need to see a doctor about.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-17-2013, 02:16 PM
And I'd be chewing my arm off if I ate tht many carbs - way too much sugar and starch for my body! It can be very hard to control portions on such a processed, carb-heavy diet, so I'd look into modifying that too, if you can. I know budget is an issue for you, but you're doing your health and weight loss a disservice with overly salty noodles and glorified candy bars, which is what granola is!
i need help with restricting carbs. i don't really even know what kind of stuff has carbs and what doesn't.

also the granola bars are oats and honey, and only 90 calories each. i don't get the chewy chocolate covered types, i get the natural ones. and i really don't eat ramen that often, it's really mostly around for when i have nothing else to eat that night.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-17-2013, 02:18 PM
And I have to take my daughter to piano now - apologies for the thread jack, Alyssa :)

its okay, reading some of the stuff posted here was interesting.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-17-2013, 02:21 PM
If counting calories triggers obsessive thoughts or behaviours, then definitely don't count calories. That said, I think it's VERY easy to underestimate quantity, and I'm probably guilty of doing that every day. My saving grace is exercise. If you're unable to exercise you need to find simple, stress-free ways to control quantity. One thing I've done in the past is make a list of 5 core breakfasts, lunches. dinners, and snacks (including specified quantities, such as 2 cups) -- and rotate between them. (Now that I'm in maintenance I'm nowhere near that systematic or diligent.)

Freelancei eat small portions of most things but large portions of veggies. sometimes i'll just have 2 cups of plain steamed veggies as a snack. i also like raw veggies like carrots and sweet potatoes and kohlrabi and parsnips. and i eat either cereal, oatmeal, eggs and toast, or pancakes for breakfast. someone will probably quote me saying i'm having too many carbs... and i've mentioned in the more recent replies that i need help with carb replacements. i really don't know what other sorts of things to eat, and i don't really know what has carbs.

ikesgirl80
05-17-2013, 02:24 PM
Have you heard about "The Carbohydrate Addict's Diet" by Drs. Richard and Rachel Heller? If you find any thread I have been on, likely I've recommended people at least check it out. It's rules are very minimual (my best friend with pretty severe OCD lost 100 pounds on it, and he has maintained that loss for almost 10 years, still eating that way to this day. It is VERY easy to do on a budget (Said friend is also a "thrifty person"). You may find it will at least get you started, and then once you can afford the insurance, therapy, etc., morph it into your own plan.

When I started, I was 100% CAD, and now I am mostly Paleo with calorie counting, but if you would have told me 2 1/2 years ago, I would be a calorie counter, I would have laughed at you!

Good luck!

ikesgirl80
05-17-2013, 02:40 PM
i eat small portions of most things but large portions of veggies. sometimes i'll just have 2 cups of plain steamed veggies as a snack. i also like raw veggies like carrots and sweet potatoes and kohlrabi and parsnips. and i eat either cereal, oatmeal, eggs and toast, or pancakes for breakfast. someone will probably quote me saying i'm having too many carbs... and i've mentioned in the more recent replies that i need help with carb replacements. i really don't know what other sorts of things to eat, and i don't really know what has carbs.

I like making many of my favorite carb foods (pancakes, muffins, breads, etc) with coconut and/or almond flour. It is on the expensive side, but it may help with eating less since you are on a budget!

Arctic Mama
05-17-2013, 02:59 PM
i need help with restricting carbs. i don't really even know what kind of stuff has carbs and what doesn't.

also the granola bars are oats and honey, and only 90 calories each. i don't get the chewy chocolate covered types, i get the natural ones. and i really don't eat ramen that often, it's really mostly around for when i have nothing else to eat that night.

There are carbs in most convenience foods - if it has sugar (natural or added) or starch of any kind, it has some varying degree of carbs. Even sneaky things like yogurt or milk are very heavy on carbohydrates, due to the sugars in the dairy.

A quick and dirty way to limit them is eat less processed food. Unless you really want to, you don't need to go Atkins like me (though I adore it!) or Paleo, just make simple changes to whole foods. Instead of low fat or fat free dairy, choose limited quantities of whole fat dairy, as those will tend to keep you fuller, longer. Oatmeal for breakfast is fine, just add cinnamon and butter but don't pile on the sugar (you may already be doing this, so disregard if that is the case).

Nutrition labels are your friend on any packaged food. If sugar or flour is in the first four ingredients it's best to eat in sparing quantities. If calorie counting is tough for you, can I recommend a basic exchange program? Build your meals around a framework:

Breakfast: protein/starch (think oatmeal/eggs or banana/cottage cheese)

Lunch: protein/fruit/veggie (maybe chicken thigh/apple/green beans or 2 oz cheddar/grapes/salad)

Snack: healthy fat/protein (nuts, nut butters, cheese, are excellent choices. You can add in some fruits or veggies if you're more hungry, but always pair them with a fat component)

Dinner: protein/fruit/veggie (canned tuna and full fat mayo/celery sticks/blueberries, or ground beef/apple/salad)

Parentheticals are just example meals, but it's a solid framework for nutrition AND controlling calorie intake. An exchange program paired with portion control (know what a serving of meat is, don't eat unlimited quantities of fruit, etc) is an easy and nutritious way to limit your intake while not shortchanging your body. And the foods mentioned are not expensive - stick to things like whatever produce is seasonal and cheaper cuts of meat, drastically limit prepackaged food if you can. I find I eat more in expensively when I make less recipes and instead focus on basic food components - I eat a tin of sardines, not some wacky marinated sardine salad - that saves time and money. Or I chop up celery sticks and dip them in peanut butter, instead of making a baked celery casserole. Less time, less fuss, and oftentimes less calories, too.

Does that help at all? If you must do this without calorie counting, simple exchanges might be the ticket. I personally count both calories and carbs and do well, but if counting truly triggers you I don't recommend either of those.

Arctic Mama
05-17-2013, 03:02 PM
If you re curious and don't know the carb counts in food, here is a basic list to start you out:
http://www.carbohydrate-counter.org/

Limiting that can vary dramatically, many people consume upwards of 300 carbs per day, and many carb limiting plans have people in the 50-100 net range. I, myself, eat between 20-30 net most days. Oftentimes less.

Lolo70
05-17-2013, 10:06 PM
I have had heart problems and at my worst times, my body retained 30 lbs of fluid. At the beginning, even 10 min of exercise turned me into a popsicle. What helped me was eliminating most carbs from my diet, balancing my hormones (thyroid and adrenal) and moving to a place where my immune system was not stimulated anymore (my problems were all due to chronic inflammation and all these factors contributed) and slowly increasing exercise intensity. Once I worked myself up to the 30-day shred, I started loosing volume. My weight started moving when I decided to do Medifast. It is low carb and simple as you do not need to count anything.

Leaves
05-18-2013, 06:55 AM
I'm not sure how food prices compare in the UK and the US (though a quick google suggests that the UK is more expensive), but is $200 a month not quite a bit for food? I spend the equivalent of about $30 a week on food and being a vegetarian all I really buy is fruit, veg, pulses, cheap pasta/rice and oats! I buy lots of cheap veggies, usually always the store's cheap/value range and then use them to bulk out all my meals and I find it incredibly cheap and healthy!

Maybe an idea for you? Bulking out with cheap veg means you can have less of the carby bit, and still feel full. Also, it looks on the plate like you get to have loads, but it's much lower calorie because it's mostly veggies :3