Weight Loss Support - Is it possible to be naturally chubby/skinny?




cocktailhat
05-12-2013, 06:57 AM
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freelancemomma
05-12-2013, 07:43 AM
So, is it possible to be naturally chubby/skinny? Because I can't seem to lose weight no matter what I do! :cry:

There's a thread called "more thoughts on naturally thin" you may want to check out. While it's true that people differ in body frame and (to a lesser extent) in metabolism, I think they differ far more in their eating behaviours.

I don't believe in naturally chubby/skinny as much as naturally attracted to food or not. I think some people are a LOT more attracted to food than others, and by and large these are the people who will struggle with weight.

You said you can't lose weight, but you have lost weight in the past. I'm pretty confident you could lose weight now too, if you were in a hospital program being supervised by doctors 24/7. In fact, an obesity expert has said, "I don't know a single person who can't lose weight on a medically supervised diet."

I suspect the reason you "can't" lose weight is that you have trouble sticking with eating moderately. Just about all of us 3FC-ers do. That's why so many of us (including me) have yo-yoed between higher and lower weights for decades of our lives.

For us attracted-to-food types, losing weight is not easy and maintaining it is even harder -- not physically, but mentally. But it's most definitely doable. You just have to want it badly enough, and experiment to find a way of eating that minimizes your sense of deprivation. For many of us, this means eating mostly healthy foods, enough protein and fibre to feel full, and not going too low in calories.

Freelance

RavenWolf
05-12-2013, 03:47 PM
First, welcome to 3FC! :)

I do want to say I second the post from freelancemomma. You have lost weight in the past, so you can lose it again.

It is a struggle and you do need to find what works for you, and what you can stick with.

I calorie count. I cut out sodas. I measure everything I eat! I do not "guess" the portion or try to eyeball it. I drink mostly water.

I made a whole heck of a lot of changes because for years I could not lose weight. I thought I was doing everything I could, but I wasn't. One 20 ounce bottle of soda is more than one serving. Sauces and dips can quickly add a good amount of calories. I used to drench my salads in full cal/full fat dressings.

And don't get me started on my coffee! There was so much cream and sugar in there, I might as well have skipped putting coffee in the cup! LOL!

I suggest that you do the following:
Read through posts on this forum that catch your eye.
Use the search option for specific questions you may have.
Start using a calorie tracking app/program like My Fitness Pal.
Switch to drinking water only.
Measure and/or weigh everything you eat. Log every bite or sip you take.

It is also easy to over estimate the amount of calories you burn. You might "think" you burned 500 calories but have only burned 100....And calorie burn calculations can also be way off.

I have done those things and a few other things and have dropped 42 pounds since January. Just last year I was crying that I couldn't even lose 10 pounds, or 5 for that matter!

Feel free to visit my blog to see some pics of me, my measurement changes (sometimes the scale doesn't move but our body is changing!) and maybe you will find something helpful there as well.

If you join My Fitness Pal add me as a friend there. RavenWolf1977


happynottsgirl
05-12-2013, 04:20 PM
You can do it, you can be just like them.

Take it step by step, day by day. Keep a weight loss journal.

Stars
05-12-2013, 05:36 PM
I don't mean to spoil it for you, but I lost 20lb because all I ate for the day was a slice of ham (it only lasted for a month). Does this mean that the only way for me to lose weight is by starving?

No, you need a calorie deficit to lose weight. You don't have to starve to do it. Have you considered joining a program like weight watchers? What do you typically do to try to lose weight? Do you exercise? What is a typical eating day like? Can you post a sample of what you eat for a day when you are trying to lose weight?










.

Arctic Mama
05-12-2013, 07:34 PM
People have varying frames, metabolisms, and hormonal responses to food. Some folks definitely are bigger by nature than others (I have two daughters, for example, who are fed identical diets and yet one is strong and broad and the other is short and slight, they wear the same clothes despite being different ages). But if we're talking morbid obesity, even pediatric onset? Very, very rarely would it be something 'natural' to the person, unless they had a severe endocrine disorder.

Now, minor dysfunction in that area IS common, and can cause both inappropriate appetite and more ready energy storage, when food is present in the system. But while it can and does happen, that does NOT mean it cannot be managed. It's the primary reason I do the diet I do (low carb, somewhat calorie controlled) - to deal with metabolic issues that make it too challenging to lose weight on a higher carb diet. I have to circumvent the system, so to speak, to keep cravings manageable enough that I can lose. I also have to suppress insulin spikes as much as possible or I begin to feel badly.

All this to say that Freelance is right and that thread is what you should read. While there is a whole spectrum of body shapes and the accompanying genetics behind them, that doesn't mean one is doomed to never overcome it or manage it. I was chubby from childhood and morbidly obese by the end of high school. And yet I have still managed to lose about 30% of my starting body weight and maintain it through physiologically challenging circumstances, for multiple years. It CAN be done, but not every diet is suitable for every person, and some are easier to adhere to than others.

Arctic Mama
05-12-2013, 07:36 PM
And I must say, unless you're being melodramatic please talk to someone in real life about your suicidal feelings. That is a far more severe problem for you than the weight. And fixing the weight without sorting out the emotional issues than can accompany it is a quick recipe for regain.

Arctic Mama
05-13-2013, 09:45 PM
Well I hate to say it, but you're going to stay that way as long as your attitude is that you can't lose weight.

Nobody can do it for you but you, and even with a genetic tendency toward higher body weight or more easily accumulated fat mass, it is no life sentence to obesity if you don't allow it to be. You're in the driver's seat making the choices here, nobody else.

Genetics load the gun, but our choices and habits pull the trigger. If you don't take control, then yes, you WILL be unable to lose weight. But that's your choice, and don't fool yourself to the contrary.

thewalrus0
05-14-2013, 01:13 AM
I think weight loss starts with education.

I've been researching health and fitness since age 17, but before that I had an ED and starved myself.

I used to believe the only way was to eat almost nothing and exercise religiously.

Then I started to educate myself, but I am still struggling with lasting weight loss because I am one of those people who is naturally predisposed to crave foods when they aren't truly hungry. I struggled also with some issues with perfect eating and trying too much too soon.

When they say to take baby steps they really mean it!

But your attitude will be your biggest asset.

rubidoux
05-14-2013, 01:46 AM
I don't mean to spoil it for you, but I lost 20lb because all I ate for the day was a slice of ham (it only lasted for a month). Does this mean that the only way for me to lose weight is by starving?

After many years of trying every diet imaginable (or so I thought), I started eating *nothing* but meat. I didn't think it was going to make me lose, since nothing had. But I was pretty sure it would be helpful for my blood sugars. But then, what do ya know... the pounds just melted off me. I'm not saying you should necessarily go this route, but you may have been onto something w the ham. 20 pounds in a month is pretty impressive!

Well I hate to say it, but you're going to stay that way as long as your attitude is that you can't lose weight.

Nobody can do it for you but you, and even with a genetic tendency toward higher body weight or more easily accumulated fat mass, it is no life sentence to obesity if you don't allow it to be. You're in the driver's seat making the choices here, nobody else.

Genetics load the gun, but our choices and habits pull the trigger. If you don't take control, then yes, you WILL be unable to lose weight. But that's your choice, and don't fool yourself to the contrary.

I do understand what you're saying and why you're saying it. BUT I was totally in that place of believing that it was actually impossible for me to lose weight. I had even had doctors tell me that type I's cannot lose weight. I 100% believed that my fate was to either starve myself and stay at my 40+ bmi or to get a little bigger every year until who knows what...

But the minute I realized what was happening w the meat everything changed for me. Really it was a very sudden turnaround that changed my whole outlook and I really went with it.

It was not that I had a bad attitude or pulled the trigger w my bad choices or was refusing to take control. There was nothing more that I wanted than to be able to control this central devastating problem in my life. Every time a diet turned out to not work for me I thought I needed more d*mned vegetables and less fat. Looking back on it I cannot believe how whole-heartedly I bought into all that cr*p, but I guess I really did. Even though I had done Atkins for years earlier on, more than a decade before discovering the meat thing, I still believed I needed freaking veggies and less fat. Gah! I guess it comes down to the fact that I wasn't thinking outside the box bc I had been so thoroughly indoctrinated. But it wasn't a bad attitude.

freelancemomma
05-14-2013, 07:55 AM
<<I keep thinking it's genetic! I remember all I ate as a child were boiled eggs, potatoes, spinach and grilled chicken. The only time of the week where I could put a sweet in my mouth was on Friday, right after school. >>

You can lose weight on Twinkies (not that I'd recommend it) and gain weight on chicken and eggs, if you eat enough of it. Do you truly believe that if you were on a supervised diet in a hospital, you could not lose weight? I don't. I believe you could do it -- and that you wouldn't have to starve yourself.

Wonky genes can make things a LITTLE harder, but can't override the first law of thermodynamics. Every living human expends a certain amount of energy to keep the body going, plus the energy to move and digest. It may be 2,500 cals/day for some people and 1,500 for others, but there's a floor. Eat less than that and you'll lose weight over time.

Freelance

Buffinlovin
05-14-2013, 04:31 PM
Genetics can play a role, but as many others have said, attitude and willpower can overcome those =)

I am the oldest of 3 girls, and I have always been pudgy. My 2 younger sisters are both incredibly thin, many of my family members are well proportioned and attractive, and all I saw when I was around them was a chubby Plain Jane.

I've been on that emotional side, also...hating myself, starving myself, wishing something would change. But really, only you can make that first step towards changing, no one is going to be able to do it for you. It took a long time for me to realize that.

There are so many weight loss plans out there to try...low carb, high protein, calorie counting, etc. I chose weight watchers because it seemed the most forgiving if I had a bad day, and I could still enjoy many of my favorite things in moderation. It seems like a lot of work to start, and I still make mistakes, but I'm glad I'm doing it. Any change towards eating and living healthier is good...even if it's just a walk around the block, or choosing the carrots over the chips.

Even just being mindful of what you eat is a good start...I didn't realize how often I would go into the kitchen for munchies until I started keeping a journal. Now I cook a bunch of things one day a week, and just grab and re-heat when needed throughout the week. I write the point value right on the box/package, and it makes keeping track a lot easier.

Hang in there, and always try to stay positive =) I know it's easier said than done, but like I said, any change for the good is better than no change at all. I know you can do it!!

IanG
05-14-2013, 04:36 PM
No. Haven't read the replies but I have spent the last 38 years under the assumption that my estranged father was "big" therefore I must be "big". Note that my mother, now aged 60, is in great shape as is my brother. Both are super skinny.

Having tried weightloss I have come to the conclusion three decades late that I am not genetically disposed to being big and that my mom may actually be more dominant in my "natural" size. In simple terms, I am dropping it like it's hot now I am watching what I eat (most importantly) and exercising more.

Lecomtes
05-14-2013, 05:08 PM
It is not genetic, and I know it's not an easy thing to hear but this weight loss business really is just about burning more calories than you eat. Like you, I have been big from a very young age...I know how it feels to get wrapped up in wondering "WHY ME?!, is this genetic, it's so unfair!...etc.", this burden was unfairly and carelessly hoisted upon us...it ABSOLUTELY was. You are not unjustified in your anger and confusion...but here's the catch, YOU have the power now. Many, many people have lost the weight, take them as your examples. Each and every one of them did it the same way, regardless of what "plans" and "diets" you may hear them speak of...they ate fewer calories than they burned throughout the day. There is no need to starve yourself. I have lost 50 lbs by not exceeding 1500 calories each day, and light work outs. If I want an ice cream or something like that, I eat it! As another 3FC poster has said, "I eat anything I want, just not as much as I want." If I can do this, YOU CAN TOO! Please do not even fathom taking your own life, there is so much more beauty to life than being thin...sticking it out, through the good days and the bad, is the only way to find it. Outward beauty is transient...value inner beauty instead. This is absolutely NOT genetic, there is nothing "wrong" with you, and you absolutely can do this if you set your mind to it. You've made a positive decision in joining 3FC, there are endless examples to emulate here, go take a look at the Goals page, and you'll see for yourself just how possible this is. :) HUGS!

joefla70
05-14-2013, 05:25 PM
Ever since I can remember, I have always been overweight. I have always been the fat friend, the fat daughter, sister, cousin, etc. There simply hasn't been a single stage of my life where I have felt anywhere near thin. Since 13, I had never weighed less than 152lb, until I got depressed and lost 20lb. Unfortunately, I soon gained it back, plus an extra 62lb, meaning I now weigh 209 pounds! I feel so depressed and envious of skinny girls I want to take my own life! So, is it possible to be naturally chubby/skinny? Because I can't seem to lose weight no matter what I do! :cry:

I was the same way. I was 220 pounds when I started high school. Over the years I lost a little weight, but always gained it back and then some. I can't ever remember a time when I wasn't overweight. So sure, it would have been easy for me to think that I was just always going to be fat because I have always been fat.

For years I let myself stay fat. Then, 8 months ago when I reached my highest weight of over 400 pounds, I decided - once and for all - to make a commitment to myself to lose weight. I realized that I never really gave losing weight my best effort. I never stuck with a way of eating. I never made a lifestyle change. It was always a temporary diet that I abandoned eventually.

When I finally figured out that I had to change my way of eating for good, I was able to succeed in losing. Today, I am 145 pounds lighter.

If I can do it, anybody can do it. I know you want to, badly. You can do this!

hhm6
05-15-2013, 05:31 PM
Thanks everyone, all of your replies were very polite and well-mannered (and helpful!). I would like to know what you think about weight loss supplements. Do you think they work? Have you tried any?

Do you mean weight loss pills? Or things like meal replacement shakes?

I have tried literally hundreds of the weight loss pills/drinks none of them have ever made me lose anything permanently. At most I would lose 5 lbs and then gain 15 the following month. A lot of them also state "eat an appropriate diet" well, if you can eat an appropriate diet and just incorporate some exercise, the extra $$ on pills is really unnecessary, and quite honestly it never works!

I also got really sick on one of the pills I was taking (Alli) and had to go on a cleanse to get it out of my system. So to sum it up, I have a had horrible experience with weight loss supplements! I would not recommend it to anyone wanting to lose weight, they were so expensive too!

I don't have experience with things like slim fast/weight watchers though if that's what you were referring to!

I don't know if you've heard of the Dukan diet, but that's what I'm currently doing and it's the first time in my life I have lost this much weight and kept it off. There isn't any calorie counting either! Everyone is different, but it's a great diet in case you're interested!

JohnP
05-15-2013, 05:47 PM
Thanks everyone, all of your replies were very polite and well-mannered (and helpful!). I would like to know what you think about weight loss supplements. Do you think they work? Have you tried any?

The only weight loss supplements that works are ones that speed up your metabolism while suppressing your appetite. So on the lower end you have caffiene and on the top end you have the illegal drugs like speed. There is a reason fen-phen was made illegal ... people died. No matter what any ad says you can't speed up fat loss without the use of stimulants because most of your metabolism is your heart rate and other bodily functions that go on 24/7. Stimulants can be synthetic or herbal but either way they can be extremely dangerous especially to people with high blood pressure or when combined with exercise.

Bottom line - at best weight loss supplements will give you a slight metabolic boost (5% max) and at worst you will have a heart attack or stroke. Either way - not worth it - even if they were free.

luckymommy
05-15-2013, 05:54 PM
The supplement that I've read about which could play a role in weight loss is Vitamin D (3). Here is an article http://www.caloriesecrets.net/does-vitamin-d-help-with-weight-loss/

I suggest you start writing down every single food or caloric drink that goes in your mouth for a week. Then, determine how many calories you're consuming and it might be eye opening to see the numbers. You can also post a sample day on here and people can give you some helpful hints on how to swap some items in order to create a calorie deficit. Please measure and weigh all your foods to decrease the chance of error.

I really hope you take to heart how valuable your life is and that our outward appearance has nothing to do with our self worth. You're here for a reason and it might take you some time to figure it out. Be kind to yourself and treat your body with love.

linJber
05-15-2013, 08:57 PM
Until we weigh and measure, and especially until we write it all down, I think we ALL underestimate how many calories we eat. An error of 200 calories per day can be the difference between losing at a steady pace and gaining at a steady pace. A plain fast food burger is usually about 350 calories. It all adds up quickly. Good luck in figuring this out. I agree with everyone who said that just about everyone will lose if they pay attention to total calories in vs total calories out.

Lin

happynottsgirl
05-16-2013, 04:58 AM
I use alli and for me they work great, they are expensive though.

IanG
05-16-2013, 05:13 AM
speed

I hadn't thought of that.

Dealer anyone?

ikesgirl80
05-16-2013, 07:49 AM
Thanks everyone, all of your replies were very polite and well-mannered (and helpful!). I would like to know what you think about weight loss supplements. Do you think they work? Have you tried any?

I have tried many. All but 2 did not work. The ones that worked were:

1) phentermine ~ it did kill my physical apatite, but NOT my mental one. This means I would do really good M-F, but Friday night-Sunday, I would still binge because of my food addiction. And my blood pressure was through the roof on it.

2)Super -HD (from GNC) ~ This worked nicely, it took the edge off my hunger and gave me a little boost of energy. I took 2 in the AM and 1 in the PM if I was going to the gym. However, 3 different friends have tried taking just 1 pill and they were jittery for days from just that.

I used the Super HD for about 1 year, and then I decided that I couldn't use it forever, so I weaned myself off of it (1 per day, 1 every other day, etc), and have done very well, although it is still A LOT of work.

But like we say here, choose your hard!

beerab
05-16-2013, 10:29 PM
Do you actually measure and count your calories? I have a friend who was almost 400 lbs, told me she couldn't understand why she kept gaining weight and she "barely ate anything."

I told her join myfitnesspal and start logging everything, only then did she realize she was averaging like 5,000 calories a day. She started cutting out things like junk food, soda, and then joined a gym, and now she's around 300ish pounds. :)

Also, have you gone to the doctor to get thyroid checked? What about the possibility of you having PCOS? I was always chubby, as far back as I can remember, and I ballooned when I got to college. Come to find I have PCOS so I have to stay away from eating too many carbs, specially "white" carbs. I changed my diet and so far have lost 30 lbs, I still have about 70 to go, but in the years I have been on the South Beach Diet I have consistently maintained and lost. Last year I had some health issues that caused me to gain weight (went back up to 213), BUT I have lost most of that.

Gaining weight takes time, losing it does too.

freelancemomma
05-17-2013, 07:50 AM
Do you actually measure and count your calories? I have a friend who was almost 400 lbs, told me she couldn't understand why she kept gaining weight and she "barely ate anything." I told her join myfitnesspal and start logging everything, only then did she realize she was averaging like 5,000 calories a day.

Wow. I wonder how common such skewed perceptions are.

F.

ikesgirl80
05-17-2013, 08:37 AM
Wow. I wonder how common such skewed perceptions are.

F.

Oh my! Mine were off the charts skewed! Even after I had been dieting for 2-3 months, I thought I was eating about 2,000 calories a day, and I was eating closer to 4,000 AND STILL LOSING (I was also still over 300 pounds and doing 1 hour of cardio per day)!

JenMusic
05-17-2013, 09:19 AM
Wow. I wonder how common such skewed perceptions are.

F.

I have often wished that, before I started calorie counting with the intent to lose, that I'd tracked a week of "normal" eating. I was 32 when I started counting calories and had NO CONCEPTION of how many calories my body needed or how many cals I should eat in order to lose weight. This, in spite being an intelligent, educated, and well-read woman - nutritional information was always out there, of course, but never on my radar.

My guess is that, at my high weight, I was probably eating somewhere between 2500-3000 cals/day, on average (with occasional days much higher than this, I'm sure). Although I was always at least moderately active, this is still much too much for a woman of my height.

freelancemomma
05-17-2013, 11:11 AM
Oh my! Mine were off the charts skewed! Even after I had been dieting for 2-3 months, I thought I was eating about 2,000 calories a day, and I was eating closer to 4,000 AND STILL LOSING (I was also still over 300 pounds and doing 1 hour of cardio per day)!

Wow. That's very interesting.

F.

ikesgirl80
05-17-2013, 01:04 PM
Wow. That's very interesting.

F.

The diet I did at the very beginning was called "The Carbohydrate Addict's Diet" (you have probably seen me talk about it). Basically you eat a low carb breakfast and lunch (about 4 oz of protein and 2 cups of veggies, a 1 serving of fat, but if you want more, they don't limit you) and dinner is called "Your Reward Meal". There you can eat anything you want as long as it is approximately 1/3 meat, low carb veggies, carbs and it is complete within 60 minutes (first bite to last bite). If you want more of something, you have to have more of everything, so it is balanced. I always started my meal with a mixing bowl sized salad with low cal dressing (100-150 calories usually, minus cheese), and had 4 cups (measured while frozen) frozen veggies (100 calories). Then I ate til I was full. I love both carbs and protein, so I never worried about balancing them. I just made sure to eat all my veggies first.

There is no calorie counting, but eating the low carb all day is suppose to make your body release less insulin when you eat the high carb meal. It is also suppose to help stop binge eating because you can have whatever you want, just only once per day in that hour.

It worked great for me initally, because it allowed me to binge, with rules. I was eating so many calories before starting (around 10,000 calories per day!), I did lose weight. After a couple months, I was still losing, but not fast enough. When I started looking at my calories, I realized I was eating double what I should have been!

toastedsmoke
05-18-2013, 04:51 AM
I think it's possible to have a natural tendency to be chubbier or skinnier or more muscular in terms of body type. However, I don't think this means that you're destined to remain that way forever. I was a chubby baby that never leaned out and overweight/obese from the age of 1 to the age of 22 when I took myself in hand and decided enough was enough.

Yes I have friends who struggle to gain weight or get curves or put on muscle, but my own struggle is to lose weight. Obviously, my diet habits and the quantity of food I like to eat has influenced my weight. My mom is morbidly obese on the completely whole foods diet she's eaten all her life, so it's not necessary about eating or not eating junk. The point I'm trying to make is that we all have our struggles in trying to get the body we want or be as healthy as we want. My natural tendency to be sturdier means I have to be extra vigilant about what goes into my mouth and monitor that, I can't just wing it.

And by the way having been obese my ENTIRE life till I was 22-24 without a single skinny phase during childhood or my teens, I can tell you it is possible to meet your goals. I lost over 120 lbs and maintained it for almost a year. In the last couple of months or so, I became a little less vigilant and put on 10 or so pounds, but I know what I need to do to get back to where I want to be, and if it means that much to me, I'll put in the effort. Will I ever be effortlessly, "naturally" skinny? No I doubt it. Not only have I gotten the genes from my mother's side that give me a tendency to shall we say "store energy" pretty easily, my complex relationship with food means I'll probably always have to watch what I eat. However, it is what it is, and so I've accepted it.

beerab
05-20-2013, 02:42 PM
Ikesgirl you have intrigued me so much with this diet I've actually ordered a copy off of amazon. I've kind of started doing this anyways :)

Arctic Mama
05-20-2013, 04:26 PM
Beerab - I've heard good things about it on another board, too. Now if you have a fair bit of insulin resistance with your PCOS it might not control that well enough and a more carbohydrate restrictive diet would be wiser for managing that particular condition, but if you only display mild metabolic issues with your PCOS it could be a very good fit for you :)

ikesgirl80
05-20-2013, 05:33 PM
Ikesgirl you have intrigued me so much with this diet I've actually ordered a copy off of amazon. I've kind of started doing this anyways :)

lol I'm glad! I don't think it is a diet for everyone, but I do think it is a great starting point for someone who "just can't". I was that person, and it really helped me! If you ever have any questions about it, let me know!

Beerab - I've heard good things about it on another board, too. Now if you have a fair bit of insulin resistance with your PCOS it might not control that well enough and a more carbohydrate restrictive diet would be wiser for managing that particular condition, but if you only display mild metabolic issues with your PCOS it could be a very good fit for you :)

My insulin when I started this diet was more than 5 times the upper limit. Now it is normal, and I have been able to go back to eating carbs throughout the day, but I also cut out MOST carbs other than fruit and veggies. My biggest issue is I just can't seem to give up the veggies crisps! I know they are just over glorified potatoes with a pinch of tomato and spinach, but limit them to 1 serving, 3-4 times per week, instead of 2-3 servings 6-7 days a week. Now that I can eat "more normally", that is one thing I am not willing to give up! I have just the IR and not the PCOS, so I don't know if that affects the effectiveness of the diet or not.

I have one friend who lost over 100 pounds on the CAD, and to this day eats that way and maintains his weight. I however, need to use it as a stepping stone. I am hoping my IR was a symptom of being "super obese" and now that I have made the lifestyle changes, and monitor my self for binging, I should be OK! :carrot:

Arctic Mama
05-20-2013, 05:58 PM
Yes, it's definitely a step in the right direction, if not the end all, be all, for one who is already showing carb sensitivity. Big congratulations to both you and your friend for your weight loss and maintenance!

Arctic Mama
05-20-2013, 06:23 PM
I think you should try some of the suggestions already given. Look at how many of us have lost huge amounts of weight and kept it off. By and large it wasn't done with fad diets, 'tricking' our bodies, pills, shakes, surgery, or any other diet industry fix. Most of us picked a plan and stuck with it. Rinse and repeat for as many days or years as we want to keep the weight off.

Intermittent fasting or alternate day fasts can certainly work, but not for any reason beyond appetite suppression (for some practitioners) and a comfortable plan for their lifestyles and preferences. It still works much the same way as regular old calorie counting, it just groups them differently. Nothing special there at all. If you think you'd adhere to a calorie deficit better with different amounts on different days or times, go for it. But an overall energy deficit must still be achieved.

Nobody is going to pop on here and give you a magic answer that doesn't require consistency, effort, and long term commitment. It doesn't exist. Even the bariatric surgery folks must exercise much the same formula to lose their weight and maintain it - the surgery is just a tool. But fairy dust and complex dietary accounting and secretly super hidden rainforest berries aren't how you're going to lose and keep off weight. Nor do I buy the line that you can only lose if you starve.

Here's a challenge for you: get a food scale, measuring cups, measuring spoons, and a piece of paper/pencil. Measure your food and stick to a calorie budget of 1800 calories, every day, for one year. Just a year. If you haven't lost a significant chunk of your excess weight with accurate food measuring and tracking and no cheats I'll eat my hat. And if you're unwilling to do that or something awfully similar, like an exchange program, then you're not really ready to get that weight off no matter how miserable you claim to be and how impossible you claim weight loss is for you. It isn't impossible until a consistent, long term calorie deficit has proven to not work - and even then, there are other adjustments that can be made from that point. But accurately understanding how much you're eating and not cheating or getting off track is crucial to actually losing. And if you DO get off track, get right back on.

There is absolutely no more advice I can give you. This is pretty much prescriptive for weight loss and management, as a starting point.

mimsyborogoves
05-20-2013, 10:57 PM
I'm sorry for asking this but why did you get so defensive? I'm just trying to find a meal plan to stick to since I have NO TIME to make my own! I really appreciate your advice and I'm, in fact, going to buy a kitchen scale and a spoon scale, as well as measuring cups and spoons. I just really wanted to follow an already existing plan.


Calorie counting is probably the easiest thing you could do, especially with an app or website like MyFitnessPal that pretty much does all the "work" for you. The food you eat is up to you, and you already know what obviously is junk food and generally what's healthy. That's a place for you to start. Trust me, I am no cook and I don't really spend a whole lot of time trying to figure out meals and recipes and stuff. I just go with what I know. You might have to do a little extra research, but really once you get into the swing of things calorie counting becomes something you won't even think about doing.

Start out with basic meals. I base my meals off of two main things -- protein and fiber, and I get those things from fruits, veggies, nuts, whole wheat and grain products, low/non-fat dairy and lean meats like chicken, turkey, and fish. Something as simple as eggs and fruit can be breakfast, a salad with nuts, meat, and/or cheese for lunch, and a 3-4oz skinless baked chicken breast with brown rice and veggies can be dinner. Of course you can expand this as you go along, but it's really no more complex than that unless you have food allergies/sensitivities/triggers that you need to pay attention to. Just try it and see if you don't see some sort of difference; if anything, you'll feel better than you do now.

Amarantha2
05-21-2013, 01:13 AM
Calorie cycling is basically what I do, just varying the amount of calories I eat in a week & focusing on the average. I have had a very large weight loss over a period of two decades & maintained it more or less over that time period.

Many diet plans, including Weight Watchers (although they don't say so) are based on calorie cycling.

It works well for me, anyway.

How about calorie shifting? Has anyone tried it? :lol:

mimsyborogoves
05-22-2013, 02:01 PM
As far as exercise goes, most people here will tell you weight lifting is one of the most beneficial things you can do, and whole I don't disagree with that, I think as far as you're concerned, anything is better than nothing and whatever you can do and stick to doing is what the best exercise is for you. Me? I'm using an app on my phone that's called something like "free daily workout" that gives you various body exercises and cardio exercises to do that you can do right in your living room, and I'll probably do that until I get bored with it and then I'll go to the gym and use an elliptical for cardio and then do some work with weights.

But you don't have to do what I do; you could walk, ride a bike, do Zumba classes, go running, weight lift, swim, do yoga...anything that helps burn extra calories that you like to do. It's all up to you and what you feel comfortable and capable of doing.