Weight Loss Support - Does anyone eat whatever they want as long as it's within your calorie range?




K-boogie
05-07-2013, 01:27 PM
So I am back to counting calories but before that I have been on diets where I've restricted so much. I'm trying to find a way to watch my calories/portions but not feel deprived.

Anyway today I am at work and I had a craving for oreros, so I popped my 100 cal bag of popcorn and got a pack of oreros from the vending machine (240 calories) and thought to myself hey why can't I have them as long as it's not an everyday thing and within my calorie range?

So I wanted to know does anyone else eat whatever they want as long as it's within their calorie range?


Candeka
05-07-2013, 01:29 PM
Some days I will. Some days my goal is just to be under/at my calorie limit. These usually include weekends when the hubby is home and we always end up eating out.

I try to balance it will days were I also focus on carbs/protien/fat though. Well I don't count carbs, I do try to make sure my macros are somewhat balanced and my calories are not 90% from carbs or something.

However, my main goal is calories so I don't stress about the other stuff. Frozen yogurt and cookies tend to make frequent appearances in my calorie tracker and they have not hindered my weight loss!

wolfgirl69
05-07-2013, 01:31 PM
I used to and it never got in the way of my weight loss- but I decided I wanted to eat healthier. I didn't like how I was eating. I wanted to take better care of my body. So I am trying to integrate veggies into my diet and slowly make junk food a minority in it.


alaskanlaughter
05-07-2013, 01:37 PM
I try to make sure that MOST of my food is healthy choices and not junk....especially because junk comes with a high calorie "pricetag"...however I definitely will eat a treat or something if it's within my calorie budget

Hoopty
05-07-2013, 01:42 PM
Same here. Since I don't want to have too many restrictions I have some junk every once in a while but always make sure I don't go over my calorie limit. If I feel like it was a little too much then I try to cut back for dinner or do an extra round of cardio at the gym.

pnkrckpixikat
05-07-2013, 01:44 PM
To an extent, not at every meal but I will splurge sometimes. The only problem for me is sugar makes me crave more sugar so I'm learning my splurges are safest on things that aren't sweet :(

wolfgirl69
05-07-2013, 01:47 PM
To an extent, not at every meal but I will splurge sometimes. The only problem for me is sugar makes me crave more sugar so I'm learning my splurges are safest on things that aren't sweet :(

This is me with chips. Eat some want some. I am trying to resist them.... but I caved this morning. :( I had some fritos but I only had 3oz and this is my last day I am gonna make sure of it.

Munchy
05-07-2013, 01:51 PM
Yep, and it's typically beer or champagne. With food, I almost always find a way to make whatever it is that I'm craving - but I also don't really have a sweet tooth, so I'm sure that helps.

If I want a burger, I'm making a satisfying 200 calorie burger instead of buying a 400 calorie burger. If I want pizza, I'm going to make a full personal sized one instead of having one tiny slice for double the calories.

It's not because I can't eat the junk, it's because I want to eat more of it, better quality, and make the calories work for me!

newleaf123
05-07-2013, 01:53 PM
I eat what I want, with caveats. What I want is subject to intellectual rumination,meaning I try to think it through - remind myself that I always feel awful after eating X, or that eating Y always turns into a bad day of eating, etc. but if I still want it, I eat it. Granted, I don't count calories, though. I just try to eat less than I need, and move more than I'm naturally inclined.

Also, what I want has changed for the better with time.

JohnP
05-07-2013, 02:20 PM
Ultimately what determines success is one's ability to establish good dietary habits.

If you're the kind of person that can eat 240 calories of oreos every day and not have it affect any other part of your diet than I see no problem with it but most people find that those types of foods end up making it difficult to keep the rest of their diet on track.

Mozzy
05-07-2013, 02:24 PM
I eat what I want within my calorie limit.

Granted I have decided a lot of foods aren't "worth" my calories, but in theory I can eat whatever I want.

CherryPie99
05-07-2013, 02:27 PM
No way. I certainly have times when I splurge. But for most days I wouldn't "waste" the precious calories I get on crap when I can get a whole bunch of great food that is fuel for my body!

Funny, I just wrote a blog post on this very thing...

http://jenhudsonmosher.blogspot.com/2013/05/spending-calories.html

Jen

RavenWolf
05-07-2013, 02:27 PM
I eat whatever I want and just watch my portion sizes. Most times, if I want something really calorie heavy (like Red Robin's Guacamole burger...Yum!) I eat only half and drink water with it.

There isn't anything I have completely restricted myself from EXCEPT for soda. Mountain Dew, specifically.

In the very beginning I did deprive myself of almost everything I loved, and I was so depressed! I HATED life! Then I started having what I love from time to time in moderation, which is key.

Also, to stay feeling full I eat protein of some sort at every meal. I'm never hungry.

Good luck and hope you find what works for you!

krampus
05-07-2013, 02:32 PM
Yes. I never eat anything I don't want. I have retrained my body to want nutritious food most of the time, but since I still like them, ice cream and sweet treats are going to make an appearance on the regular.

angelareads
05-07-2013, 02:49 PM
I still have little treats now and then, but I now watch my portion size. So instead of the 5 or 6 cookies I would eat in one sitting, I eat 1 or 2, but only if I have exercised that day! Exercising gives me a few extra calories for a not so healthy snack--so I tell myself I can't have a snack unless I burn a specific number of calories (usually higher than I normally do) through exercise. I just can't live with out a cookie now and then! :dizzy:

Skettihead03
05-07-2013, 02:50 PM
Here's my thoughts - I think indulging in your cravings every once in awhile is only human and a must. We do not need to put foods we love on a never eat again list. But I really don't agree with the whole "eat whatever you want under a certain amount of calories" deal.

Someone my size could easily eat 1200 calories a day on cookies and fatty foods and still lose weight at first just from constricting calories. But I don't just want to be skinny, I want to be healthy. I don't want to be skinny with high cholesterol or clogged arteries. I want to be skinny and healthy and live a long life. So in the end, 1200 calories of fruits, veggies, good carbs and protein is going to help me be more successful and healthier.

That's not to say that I don't indulge! I do. I have a sweet snack (like skinny cow ice cream) probably once a week, maybe twice. But I do not go all willy nilly all day everyday just because its under 1200 calories, or whatever. :)

elvislover324
05-07-2013, 02:52 PM
No way. I certainly have times when I splurge. But for most days I wouldn't "waste" the precious calories I get on crap when I can get a whole bunch of great food that is fuel for my body!

Funny, I just wrote a blog post on this very thing...

http://jenhudsonmosher.blogspot.com/2013/05/spending-calories.html

Jen

Loved that posting on your blog! I should add a dollar sign to my food journal, it will have so much more meaning! And gorgeous picture on your profile, you look so pretty in red!!

wolfgirl69
05-07-2013, 02:56 PM
Here's my thoughts - I think indulging in your cravings every once in awhile is only human and a must. We do not need to put foods we love on a never eat again list. But I really don't agree with the whole "eat whatever you want under a certain amount of calories" deal.

Someone my size could easily eat 1200 calories a day on cookies and fatty foods and still lose weight at first just from constricting calories. But I don't just want to be skinny, I want to be healthy. I don't want to be skinny with high cholesterol or clogged arteries. I want to be skinny and healthy and live a long life. So in the end, 1200 calories of fruits, veggies, good carbs and protein is going to help me be more successful and healthier.

That's not to say that I don't indulge! I do. I have a sweet snack (like skinny cow ice cream) probably once a week, maybe twice. But I do not go all willy nilly all day everyday just because its under 1200 calories, or whatever. :)

EXACTLY!!! This is what I think!!! But like I said I used to just want to be skinny and not care what went into my body. I already have slightly high cholesterol and I am only 17. I want to change that. I had a Sonic shake medium sized yesterday for the first time and won't be doing it again for a while so no biggie nothing wrong with indulging every once in a while. But I do want to be-not just skinny-but healthy. When I was anorexic I ate junk because all I cared about was skinny not healthy. I want this to be different I want to live a healthier life. :)

Remington90
05-07-2013, 02:57 PM
I eat what I want within my calorie limit.

Granted I have decided a lot of foods aren't "worth" my calories, but in theory I can eat whatever I want.

That's how I feel too. I'll eat just about anything if I'm REALLY craving it and it falls in my budget, but a lot of times I take a step back and ask myself if that chocolate bar worth 300 calories is worth it when I could have a whole can of tuna, mayo, my "low cal" bread and a snack on top of that, for the same amount. Generally it's not worth it. Like someone else said, I mainly only splurge on booze if I do splurge. 3 shots (1oz) of vodka is 120 calories, and I just have that with water and lemon juice. It's all what you feel will work.

As John mentioned, a lot of times giving into those cravings and only having a "little" bit, leads to a lot and derailment on a lifestyle change. Thats what people need to learn is this is a LIFESTYLE change. Little treats here and there are fine, but you can't ever go back to have that big mac for lunch twice a week or eating a bag of chips on a Saturday night.

Learning to enjoy eating healthy is far more worth the satisfaction of sweets.

bethFromDayton
05-07-2013, 03:04 PM
Conceptually, I guess I do, but not in reality. The days I've eaten things that weren't within what I would normally choose were days I wasn't within calorie limits either.

I plan my treats--and those treats are within my calorie allotment, but they're generally also low-cal treats. I just can't see giving up half my dinner for a Snicker's bar!

Skettihead03
05-07-2013, 03:06 PM
EXACTLY!!! This is what I think!!! But like I said I used to just want to be skinny and not care what went into my body. I already have slightly high cholesterol and I am only 17. I want to change that. I had a Sonic shake medium sized yesterday for the first time and won't be doing it again for a while so no biggie nothing wrong with indulging every once in a while. But I do want to be-not just skinny-but healthy. When I was anorexic I ate junk because all I cared about was skinny not healthy. I want this to be different I want to live a healthier life. :)

That's great, that kind of mentality will keep you on track and make you the healthiest you possible! And that's good you treated yourself yesterday, sometimes it keeps us sane. :p My fiance, brother, and father are cooking out for my mother and I this Sunday for Mother's day so that will be my treat. :carrot:

bethFromDayton
05-07-2013, 03:26 PM
There's one more thing I wanted to add (that agrees with the slippery slope idea).

Dr Judith Beck talks about a 'resistance muscle' and a 'giving in muscle' and that everytime you strengthen one of them, it makes you more likely to use it again next time. So, if I were to see a treat and decide to eat it, that would be exercising my 'giving in' muscle, so I'd be likely to decide to eat it the next time it was available. OTH, if I see a treat and don't eat it, I've strengthened my 'resistance' muscle, and the next time, I'd be more likely and able to say to myself "I resisted yesterday, I can resist again today."

But then, Dr. Beck also has us planning our treats in advance--not on the fly. So, I could decide tonight that I'm going to plan to eat Oreos tomorrow--but I can't decide to go get a package this afternoon. (planned eating vs unplanned eating)

Psychic
05-07-2013, 03:59 PM
I eat whatever I want, but I try to keep my portions small. I try to track calories accurately.

lin43
05-07-2013, 07:25 PM
I eat what I want within my calorie limit.

Granted I have decided a lot of foods aren't "worth" my calories, but in theory I can eat whatever I want.

I do the same. Thank God I really like a lot of healthy foods (as well as a lot of unhealthy foods). I must say, though, I splurge several times a week. The only time I get strict is when I start feeling out of control, and this can definitely happen if I overeat sweets (and, of course, I have a major sweet tooth).

There's one more thing I wanted to add (that agrees with the slippery slope idea).

Dr Judith Beck talks about a 'resistance muscle' and a 'giving in muscle' and that everytime you strengthen one of them, it makes you more likely to use it again next time. So, if I were to see a treat and decide to eat it, that would be exercising my 'giving in' muscle, so I'd be likely to decide to eat it the next time it was available. OTH, if I see a treat and don't eat it, I've strengthened my 'resistance' muscle, and the next time, I'd be more likely and able to say to myself "I resisted yesterday, I can resist again today."

I complete agree with this. If I can go even 3-4 days without eating at night (after dinner), then it becomes much easier to stay with that habit.

WannaB2cute
05-07-2013, 07:36 PM
I eat what I want within my calorie limit.

Granted I have decided a lot of foods aren't "worth" my calories, but in theory I can eat whatever I want.

Completely agree. As soon as I tell myself I can't have something I want it even more. So I just determine is this ______ WORTH the calories. If I want it that bad I go for it.

Em Coconut
05-07-2013, 08:31 PM
Completely agree. As soon as I tell myself I can't have something I want it even more. So I just determine is this ______ WORTH the calories. If I want it that bad I go for it.

This.


A lot of the time it's worth it for me, as long as I can work it into my calorie budget. Sometimes even if it means I will go slightly over. And other times, it just isn't worth it, and I find a better option.:) Basically, If I want something and I can "afford" it, chances are good that I'm having it.

magical
05-07-2013, 08:55 PM
I don't track calories but I agree with others.

I don't just want to be skinny, I want to be healthy as well. In fact, this is more important to me than to be very thin - took me a long time to get to this mindset but I guess it comes with age. You wake up one day and realize that your body does actually become more physically vulnerable as you get older!!

novangel
05-07-2013, 09:33 PM
It depends. I don't have a sweet tooth so I can have 1 or 2 cookies and easily stop, for others 1-2 cookies might lead to a binge. You have to know when you're flirting with disaster and then make a judgement call.

memememe76
05-07-2013, 10:19 PM
No, I do not eat whatever I want. I don't eat anything I dislike, either, but my options are limited. Which is fine for me. I think admitting the "deprivation" aspect of weight loss and maintenance is not a sign you have been defeated by life. It's actually freeing, IMO.

ikesgirl80
05-07-2013, 10:28 PM
There's one more thing I wanted to add (that agrees with the slippery slope idea).

Dr Judith Beck talks about a 'resistance muscle' and a 'giving in muscle' and that everytime you strengthen one of them, it makes you more likely to use it again next time. So, if I were to see a treat and decide to eat it, that would be exercising my 'giving in' muscle, so I'd be likely to decide to eat it the next time it was available. OTH, if I see a treat and don't eat it, I've strengthened my 'resistance' muscle, and the next time, I'd be more likely and able to say to myself "I resisted yesterday, I can resist again today."

But then, Dr. Beck also has us planning our treats in advance--not on the fly. So, I could decide tonight that I'm going to plan to eat Oreos tomorrow--but I can't decide to go get a package this afternoon. (planned eating vs unplanned eating)


Ohhh!!! I like that muscle analogy! I am going to write that down and put it on my fridge!

Completely agree. As soon as I tell myself I can't have something I want it even more. So I just determine is this ______ WORTH the calories. If I want it that bad I go for it.

This is what I do. Although I have learned many new things, one thing that has not changed is my desire for dessert. I find if I have a high quality dessert ( 72% organic chocolate w/ orange or mint, almond or coconut ice cream, or homemade gluten free fruitcake), I am satisfied with a small amount. Store bought, restaurant, or low quality homemade stuff, I feel I must binge on them.

So I buy the good stuff, and work it into my calories each day.

Amarantha2
05-07-2013, 11:51 PM
I don't eat wheat & try to be gluten free but it has nothing to do with weight. However better calorie control is one of the good side effects of this way of eating.

Fluffypuppy
05-08-2013, 12:59 AM
I eat what I want within my calorie limit.

Granted I have decided a lot of foods aren't "worth" my calories, but in theory I can eat whatever I want.

This is what I wanted to say exactly. It's not that I've decided I can't have poutine, it's just not worth it!

betsy2013
05-08-2013, 11:46 AM
For holidays and special family events, special treats such as birthday cake are allowed -- although I have noticed that I now ask for a small piece. But the rest of the time, I try to find a taste alternative. For instance, ice cream and chocolate could be food groups by themselves for me, but I've found good substitutes that satisfy the cravings but easily keep me within my calorie range.

BeachBreeze2010
05-08-2013, 03:26 PM
I don't know. I've done it both ways. I've done it all ways, lol.

I think that if I was truly capable of eating whatever I wanted and stopping at an appropriate portion, keeping my calories at a number that will result in a healthy weight or weight loss - I wouldn't be here in the first place.

Clearly, I can't - sometimes I get overconfident from weight loss success after months of only eating healthy food and think I can just "eat like thin people do" and then 3 months and 15lbs later of not tracking, eating whatever I want with the intention of portion control, I realize I can't.

glitterhairdye
05-08-2013, 03:37 PM
I do sometimes. If there's something that I really want like birthday cake or something then I just work it into my day's calories. However, I try not to do that often because 250 calories of cake is not nearly as satisfying nor filling as 250 calories of something healthier. I also am trying to wean myself off of my addiction to sweets and find it easier to just cut them out completely.

joefla70
05-08-2013, 04:08 PM
I tip my cap to anybody who can do this. I cannot. I have a fairly defined set of food that I eat, and I try to minimize my quantities of these specific foods. Maybe one day I'll broaden my list. But I'm too afraid to do that now.

Ahri
05-08-2013, 04:22 PM
I'm extremely hard on myself I guess, but I am super strict about my intake. Sometimes if I have a craving for something that isn't healthy, I try to substitute it for something a little healthier. For example, I crave peanut butter cups a lot so instead I'll have a teaspoon of peanut butter with some dark chocolate chips and that helps.

But as long as it isn't an every day thing, I see nothing wrong with it! My partner does it and it hasn't gotten in the way of his progress.

AllyG47
05-08-2013, 04:32 PM
I don't count calories and I eat whatever I want, whenever I want. I try to make sure I only eat when I'm hungry and not give in to cravings. Before I eat something, I ask myself if I'm really hungry or if it's just a craving. I also make sure that 90% of what I eat is healthy. I usually have a treat after supper such as a piece of chocolate, a 100-calorie Snicker's ice cream bar or a cookie but I only have one serving. The meal doesn't feel "finished" until I have something sweet. I don't always have junk after supper either, sometimes I'll have healthy desserts such as an apple topped with caramel ice cream topping or a banana with fat-free whipped cream on top (tastes just like a banana cream pie). To answer the question, I do allow myself to eat whatever I want but I tend to gravitate to healthy foods and rarely want bad stuff.

Arctic Mama
05-08-2013, 05:17 PM
Only on very, very rare occasion. I cannot stay within a calorie range to lose weight, let alone be healthy or have any energy, if I blow them on starchy, sugary junk instead if nutrient dense fare. On a birthday or Christmas? Maybe. But I do much better sticking to both a calorie range and carb level, as well as focusing on whole, real foods. I had five ounces of pot roast and two Brazil nuts for breakfast for around 350 calories - is two bowls of cereal going to stick with me as long as that, let alone nourish my muscles and organs as well?

Calories are energy, but food has a much more significant impact on our bodies than just its burn value (and different foods are metabolized differently, which also matters!). A calorie budget is an excellent and often necessary starting point for weight loss, but leaving it at that is to miss much of what is important for overall health and vitality, let alone longer term weight loss (when that budget starts shrinking with our weight, blowing six hundred calories on a frozen burrito ceases to make sense when you could fill up on a salad, chicken, and an apple with peanut butter instead).

That's my experience. I counted calories for awhile as a sole means of weight management, but I necessarily transitioned to something that works much better for my body.

Gonna Get There Soon
05-08-2013, 05:33 PM
Absolutely, I will have a treat, as long as it stays within my calorie range. Everyone once in a great while I will allow myself to go over my cals...just to feel a splurge. I know I shouldn't, but sometimes things come up at the spur of the moment and I feel like if I don't allow myself a little give that I'll set myself up for a huge binge.

Chronostasis
05-08-2013, 11:33 PM
My thoughts are basically in line with what everyone else has said. My general flowchart:
Why do I want this? (emotionally upset, random craving, just hungry, social semi-obligation, etc) -> Can this be worked into my calorie limits? (I don't strictly count calories, but I track a daily estimate.) -> How large of a serving is that? -> Will I actually be satisfied with that serving size, or will I want more and end up in a binge?
I didn't eat any junk for the first two, maybe three weeks of my diet. I'm glad I did that, because small indulges at that time probably would have lead to binges. I trust myself more now.

shcirerf
05-09-2013, 12:27 AM
I have worked my plan, so that I have daily limit. However, my plan allows for weekly flex options.

I can eat them or not, my choice. They are weekly, and I cannot save them for the next week.

The nice thing is, it works, I have the flexibility, if life shows up, at the same time, if nothing is going on, I don't need them.

At the same time, I still need to remember portion control and get in my workouts.

So far, it's all good!:D

kaplods
05-09-2013, 12:36 AM
I've learned the hard way that taking only calories into consideration doesn't work well for me. When I eat high glycemic carbs, my hunger levels shoot through the roof, making sticking to my calorie budget extremely difficult. When I do splurge on high glycemic carbs, I have to then use what seems like superhuman, white-knuckled, teeth-clenching willpower just to avoid bingeing, much less staying in calorie range.

I can't say that I'm never willing to make the trade-off, but usually (even if I stay within budget calorie-wise) I end up regretting the choice, because white-knuckle willpower is just so exhausting and stressful. It's usually easier and more enjoyable in the long run to make choices based on minimizing carb-triggered hunger. For me, that's even more important than my calorie budget.

mimsyborogoves
05-09-2013, 12:42 AM
I'm like most of the people here in that sure, I CAN eat whatever I want, but DO I? No! My health numbers have improved tremendously, and I know if I go back to eating **** every day, I would not be a healthy individual. I feel so much better now: I have energy, I look better, I can do more, I can BREATHE. I don't feel sluggish and blah and bloated and gross all the time anymore. That's more worth it to me than eating pizza every day.

freelancemomma
05-09-2013, 09:47 AM
I think admitting the "deprivation" aspect of weight loss and maintenance is not a sign you have been defeated by life. It's actually freeing, IMO.

I agree with this, though I wouldn't call it deprivation as much as sacrifice. There's some sacrifice in losing weight and maintaining the loss -- no way around that. I prefer to face it head-on so it doesn't take me by surprise. I find it useful to remind myself of the trade-off: better body and better health in exchange for less freedom in eating. (For me, the loss of freedom lies only in putting limits on quantities. No foods are off-limits to me and I treat myself often.)

F.

joefla70
05-09-2013, 10:31 AM
I agree with this, though I wouldn't call it deprivation as much as sacrifice. There's some sacrifice in losing weight and maintaining the loss -- no way around that. I prefer to face it head-on so it doesn't take me by surprise. I find it useful to remind myself of the trade-off: better body and better health in exchange for less freedom in eating. (For me, the loss of freedom lies only in putting limits on quantities. No foods are off-limits to me and I treat myself often.)

F.

In the past, I would allow myself to deviate from my normal diet on special occasions like birthdays, holidays, etc. Many times those indulgences snowballed into a complete derailing of my diet. I can't afford to let that happen ever again. What I have done to deal with this is come to the realization that food does not define my life. I have made the decision, and am comfortable with the principle that special events are defined by the company you keep... not the food you eat. So, when I am celebrating my birthday, I don't care if I have cake or some certain favorite meal that is calorie-laden. On holidays like Thanksgiving, I don't care if I have stuffing or mashed potatoes. I don't NEED to have those things to enjoy these days. Having said that, its not like I am "suffering", and have just resigned myself to that. I eat things that I enjoy. I just make better choices -- and like freelancemomma said, I make sacrifices. But these sacrifices are WELL worth it.

ShaMac
05-09-2013, 10:37 AM
I pretty much eat whatever I want ,with some revisions, for dinner. My breakfast and lunch choices are rarely unhealthy. I try not to eat out often, but if I do then I may change out the bun on my burger or chicken sandwich or order less fatty toppings on my thin crust pizza. I also have a sweet tooth and I make sure to budget my calories everyday to fit in my after dinner goody. Some times it really feels as if I am not on a diet, and I feel like this is something I can do long term :)

Chronostasis
05-09-2013, 03:16 PM
I don't eat wheat & try to be gluten free but it has nothing to do with weight. However better calorie control is one of the good side effects of this way of eating.I second this, being in a similar situation.

memememe76
05-09-2013, 07:07 PM
I agree with this, though I wouldn't call it deprivation as much as sacrifice. There's some sacrifice in losing weight and maintaining the loss -- no way around that. I prefer to face it head-on so it doesn't take me by surprise. I find it useful to remind myself of the trade-off: better body and better health in exchange for less freedom in eating. (For me, the loss of freedom lies only in putting limits on quantities. No foods are off-limits to me and I treat myself often.)

F.

I'm fine with the word "sacrifice" too.

I read the "naturally thin" thread and then I read this thread and I end up all :?:. I suppose there are people in this world who can eat LOADS of calorically dense food and not gain weight, but I doubt those are the "naturally thin" people we're focusing our attention on. If so many people can "eat whatever they want as long as it's within [their] calorie range", aren't they basically "naturally thin"?

lin43
05-09-2013, 09:52 PM
If so many people can "eat whatever they want as long as it's within [their] calorie range", aren't they basically "naturally thin"?

Not at all. A "naturally thin" person is usually unaware of calories. They merely eat what they want, when they want----they just don't "want" as much or as often as many of us do. As I mentioned previously, I like many healthy foods, so I consider my diet fairly healthy---except that I often indulge in sweets. That makes it more difficult to stay within my calorie range, but I manage. A "naturally thin" person wouldn't even have to struggle to stay within limits.

K-boogie
05-15-2013, 03:52 PM
Thank you everyone for posting your thoughts/experiences. I am still working on MY PLAN. I just bought a treadmill and am soooo excited about my new journey. I realize that this time around I have to try something different in order to get different results.

In the past I could get away with losing and staying motivated with just eating certain foods day in and day out with no exercise BUT obviously that didn't last and I can't seem to go back and honestly don't want to.

I want to be "balanced" whatever that means right? :dizzy: I want to not only be slimmer but FIT! Before when I lost weight the no# on the scale was moving down but my clothes size wasn't matching. So I know exercise is key.

Anyway I want to focus on whole foods the majority of the time but be responsible when/if I want something that is not.

For lunch today I had a grilled chicken caesar salad and I wanted something sweet so I had a 100 calorie pk fudge graham cookies. Didn't eat the whole box (which is what I would normally do) , only one pack and I was satisfied and am now back at work. So far so good!

Lecomtes
05-15-2013, 04:10 PM
Yes. I never eat anything I don't want. I have retrained my body to want nutritious food most of the time, but since I still like them, ice cream and sweet treats are going to make an appearance on the regular.

I really appreciate this mode of thinking. :)

Radiojane
05-15-2013, 04:21 PM
I try to eat as cleanly, primally, paleo whatever you want to label it as possible, but I'm another person that fails when there is too much structure, so I don't beat myself up when I want something else.

Today for example, I swam on my lunch hour, and I usually go to the salad bar at the grocery store after. Couldn't get there due to road construction and couldn't get home, so I had to convince myself that one pita wasn't going to kill me and derail my scale. I'm still within my cal range, if a little over carb wise which might be a goiod thing as it seems to be actually alleviating the pms headache I've had all day.

I think that you can technically just count calories, but you give your body an edge if you fuel it properly.

elvislover324
05-15-2013, 04:37 PM
In the past, I would allow myself to deviate from my normal diet on special occasions like birthdays, holidays, etc. Many times those indulgences snowballed into a complete derailing of my diet. I can't afford to let that happen ever again. What I have done to deal with this is come to the realization that food does not define my life. I have made the decision, and am comfortable with the principle that special events are defined by the company you keep... not the food you eat. So, when I am celebrating my birthday, I don't care if I have cake or some certain favorite meal that is calorie-laden. On holidays like Thanksgiving, I don't care if I have stuffing or mashed potatoes. I don't NEED to have those things to enjoy these days. Having said that, its not like I am "suffering", and have just resigned myself to that. I eat things that I enjoy. I just make better choices -- and like freelancemomma said, I make sacrifices. But these sacrifices are WELL worth it.

^^^ This is exactly how I feel now too. Having 9 months and a loss of 132lbs (!!) under my belt, I have made it through every major holiday 100% on plan and survived them all! I'm not saying that the holidays were easy (they weren't in the beginning) but I had to overpower the food and the comfort that it brings me (or so I thought it brought me).

Now that I have done it, I know I can do it every holiday, special day, regular day.

I have impulse foods that aren't necessarily unhealthy (such as potatoes) and could fit in my calorie allotment, but the cravings they bring out in me could derail my whole weightloss mission. One little 150 calorie potato could ruin my life! And I'm stronger than any potato. :)

Crow
05-16-2013, 08:24 AM
I'm trying not just to lose weight but to build a lifestyle I can maintain long-term.

Last time I lost these pounds I was super strict with myself, stuck to the diet no matter what, and had a wedding day where I looked and felt great. Once my goal day was over I indulged in everything I'd denied myself for so long and 5 years later I'd regained every one of those 50lbs.

This time I don't have a goal day in mind, I have a goal lifestyle. If I want cake I have cake, but I make sure it comes after a healthy meal and I don't have it every day. I'm still losing the weight, but I don't feel the slightest bit deprived.

As for 'naturally skinny', my sister is (or was at least). From our childhood she indulged in everything she wanted without thinking about it. In her twenties she felt self-conscious about being too thin. She saw a dietician to help with weight gain and deliberately loaded up on high-cal food -- with absolutely no result. Now she's in her mid-thirties and her metabolism is slowing down. She's eating less and weighs more.

My youngest child is thin as a reed. He's ten months old and when the girls were this age they were chubby little cherubs. He eats exactly what they did, partially breast-fed with healthy solid feeds, but his body shape is totally different.

I wish I could be naturally skinny but I'm not. I don't beat myself up about it, I just get my head down and do the work.

freelancemomma
05-16-2013, 10:44 AM
If so many people can "eat whatever they want as long as it's within [their] calorie range", aren't they basically "naturally thin"?

Not if the calorie range is set to match physiological maintenance needs rather than natural appetite. I can eat whatever I want as long as it averages out to about 2,000 calories per day, but left to my own devices I would WANT to eat up to 4,000 cals per day. For this reason I don't consider myself naturally thin. It takes daily effort and vigilance, even though by objective standards my calorie allowance is fairly generous.

F.

betsy2013
05-16-2013, 12:05 PM
Theoretically, I can eat whatever I want and lose weight as long as I stick within my calorie, carb and sodium limits. There have been days when I just had to have a potato and I managed to work it into the day's limits. The world didn't come to an end for me. But it meant that I wasn't able to eat as much because the veggies just don't have as many calories and you can eat a lot more of them.

With that said, at holidays and on family birthdays, I will allow myself to eat carefully of the treats. Instead of my former usual enormous piece of cake with ice cream, I will allow myself a 2X2 inch square and skip the ice cream (or else bring my own Arctic Zero). I don't feel like I'm missing out on anything and it hasn't seemed to hurt.

But I do think that everyone is different and each of us has to find what works for us. No right or wrong answers here.

lin43
05-16-2013, 03:42 PM
This time I don't have a goal day in mind, I have a goal lifestyle

Love this! It's one of the best things I've read on this forum. Thank you!

kaplods
05-16-2013, 06:53 PM
If so many people can "eat whatever they want as long as it's within [their] calorie range", aren't they basically "naturally thin"?

The people I know and consider "naturally thin," don't HAVE a calorie range - at least not one they think about. They eat what they want without giving any thought at all to calories. Some have super high metabolisms and/or activity levels. They eat a lot, but burn it off. Others may eat huge amounts of food one day and then somehow, without thinking about it eat less or move more to compensate.

I've seen all different calorie ranges and types of eating for people of various sizes. There's no eating pattern or calorie range or activity level, or thought patterns about food that characterizes all thin or all fat people.

I have trouble with "trigger" foods, but hubby eats whatever he wants, but doesn't track calories, but is still losing just because he's taking smaller portions than his normal.

I think Jon P here on 3FC has a sig line that sums up that strategy (forgive me if I misquote) "I can eat whatever I want, I just can't eat everything I want."

Sometimes I even use that strategy myself. I CAN eat high glycemic and "junk" foods, but they do trigger intense cravings, so it's usually easier and more enjoyable to choose the foods that don't trigger the intense cravings I call "rabid hunger."

RitzyFritz
05-17-2013, 07:31 AM
Pretty much everything that can be said has been said on this topic, but I just thought I would chime in and say - in 2007/2008 when I had my successful weight loss, I adopted the following mindset: When folks would ask me "You can eat that on your diet!?" - or - "You're allowed to eat that!?" I would tell them, "I can eat anything I want to." Because you know what? I am a big girl and I CAN eat anything I want to - BUT, I looked at my calories as a budget. Yeah, I can spend my calories on the cookies/cake/ice cream, etc., but it won't last long and I will not be as satisfied as if I had eaten something more healthy. So basically, in a nutshell, I was stingy with my calorie budget. That worked for me, and it still works today. However, like another poster has mentioned, if I truly came back around to it and truly wanted it, I would have a much smaller portion and would count it and move on. That is where my success came from. But, as others have said, and I can totally appreciate, if it is a trigger for you, why pull the trigger?

Bocagirl
05-17-2013, 08:31 AM
I think that when you are losing weight it's a good time to try and break the addiction to sugar, so why not chose a healthier treat.

I am convinced calorie counting is the way to go. You can still allow yourself treats, but the oreos are a bit of a blow-out.

Wannabehealthy
05-17-2013, 09:23 AM
Wolfgirl69- Oh to be 17 again! LOL That was 50 years ago for me.

Now that I'm old and I have had many health problems, I can give some advice to you youngsters. Eat healthy food. Your body needs those vitamins and minerals. The junk food gives your body nothing but a few moments of pleasure.

I recently read about the Eat To Live plan. It is pretty much a vegan plan which I cannot follow, but it emphasized the importance of the micronutrients in fruits and vegetables. Fiber is a big thing. It said that if your body is receiving the nutrients it needs you will eventually lose your cravings. You won't WANT that junk food anymore. It's so nice to say "No thank you, I don't care for any" and really mean it!

LaurenM427
05-19-2013, 09:22 AM
Yes I do this. I've been on sort of a "no-diet diet" for the past seven months (since my wedding). And it's been heaven. I try and keep my calories within reason and just add high intensity exercise. But the truth is, I feel that I'm not seeing much progress in decreasing body fat. I think that because I am within the 10 pound range of my goals, perhaps I might have to get a bit more specific about just where my calories come from. This is unfortunate because I love the freedom of the no-diet diet... It makes me feel so sane and normal, and also, I don't find myself actually gaining on it. But I am going to Costa Rica in July, so that's my motivation... Good topic, thanks!!

Wannabehealthy
05-19-2013, 10:15 AM
I think that when you are losing weight it's a good time to try and break the addiction to sugar, so why not chose a healthier treat.

I am convinced calorie counting is the way to go. You can still allow yourself treats, but the oreos are a bit of a blow-out.

The bad thing about this is if you eliminate bad-for-you snacks you will eventually lose your taste for it and you body will crave healthier snacks such as fruit or nuts. As long as your body is getting that junk food it will continue to crave it.

lin43
05-19-2013, 04:49 PM
The bad thing about this is if you eliminate bad-for-you snacks you will eventually lose your taste for it and you body will crave healthier snacks such as fruit or nuts. As long as your body is getting that junk food it will continue to crave it.

This depends. I once lost weight my allowing myself to eat just three moderate meals a day and just fruit in-between. I only ate a sweet treat when I went out to eat, which was about twice a month, at most. Even though this plan seemed moderate at the time, it was too strict. After getting down to the lowest adult weight of my life (115---far too low for me), I rebelled and started eating all the foods that I had deprived myself of, including the junk. And it tasted like manna from heaven.

So, while I don't think everyone loses their taste for certain foods even after not having them for a while, I do believe that you can change your taste buds; I have much more sophisticated taste now than I did in my 20s. However, I have NEVER lost my taste for sweets, no matter how long I've gone without them. I will say, though, that if I go without them for a while, my intense cravings for them dissipate so that I can resist them more easily.

mrslynah
05-20-2013, 03:25 PM
Most of my life I have been like that. And the only time I've been more than 10 lbs overweight was after the birth of my children. As far as WEIGHT goes, I'm a firm believer in moderation and a calorie is a calorie is a calorie. ... Having said that, there is a big difference between eating for weight and eating for health and vitality. I have recently had to make some drastic changes to my diet that have turned me into one of the obnoxious "I can't eat that" people. I have stage IV endometriosis, have had three surgeries, and another one is not currently an option. I have pulled out the stops and begun to make some changes to what I eat. I have been gluten free and dairy free for one month. I have changed the quality of meat and produce I buy (local, organic or grass-fed when possible, etc.) My pain has reduced dramatically over the past couple of weeks.
If I didn't have endo, I would probably not have done as much research into the quality of my food. For weight loss and maintenance, I will tell you flat out that YES, if you learn how to enjoy sweets, fats, carbs, whatever in moderation, you CAN lose weight, you CAN maintain your weight, and you will move away from an addiction mindset (if I eat one oreo, I'll eat the whole shelf of oreos) to a normal ( I feel like an oreo, yumm!) mindset.
But if you ever get to a point when your food is not meeting your energy needs, your blood sugar needs, your mental health (neurotransmitter, hormone) needs, your medical needs, or just your desire to live a really long time, then you may decide to go a step further. If you do, it won't be because you are on a diet or some sort of fascist regime where people like you can't eat something like that. It will be because you are empowered and in control and it's what you feel like is good for you. I hope that makes sense.
I think balance is the first step, so good for you.

GordonGirl16
05-20-2013, 08:40 PM
I don't give in to cravings and have whatever I want, but I do allow myself a couple indulgences a week. I do WW, not calorie counting, but the idea is the same. If I have been craving something long-term (a couple of days) I plan my day around it - I leave myself enough points to indulge at the end of the day. And when I do indulge, I eat it slowly and really try to savor each bite so the craving goes away. Planning my treats also helps me to say no to temptations, because I know I am having a treat later.

I do give in to cravings sometimes, but when I do i try to limit the portions. I am a sucker for ice cream and my family always has some in the house. If I decide it's really worth the points and calories, I go for it, but I try to limit to the 1/2 cup serving size.

gwenaa
05-20-2013, 08:52 PM
i find when i do give into cravings(like on weekends) i always go over my calories. then i feel like crap(like now) so tomorrow i'll be back at it again with eating healthy and staying in my calorie range.

NightowlAnnie
05-20-2013, 11:45 PM
I'm back to counting calories also..and it seems to be working no matter what I eat as long as I count calories but I really want to stick to no processed foods..have my toes and fingers crossed I can stick to this one..I've never counted calories before..always done Atkins and always gained it back so need to focus on losing it and keeping it off and counting calories the rest of my life :dizzy: