General Diet Plans and Questions - Wheat Belly? Gluten Free?




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derrydaughter
04-29-2013, 07:08 AM
Anyone else out there reading the Wheat Belly book and trying to be gluten free?
I'm interested in what you are doing, a day's menu and how it's all working for you. I've been trying it and just blew it over the weekend, losing control.
Today is get back on track day for me.
I'm hoping for some ideas and recipes, especially things that work for a family who is not interested in being GF, but likes good food. : )


ikesgirl80
04-29-2013, 12:39 PM
I haven't read Wheat Belly, but I am gluten free.

I usually have a cooking day on Sunday, and make food for a week or two.

I make muffins with almond flour, eggs, honey, etc. I wrap them and freeze 1/2. Favorites are lemon w/ a berry, zucchini, banana nut, pumpkin. They hold up well in the freezer.

I have fallen in love with asparagus wrapped with bacon. 1 spear, 1/2 slice of bacon, bake in the oven to desired doneness. They last the whole work week. I like them cold for breakfast.

I cook chicken and veggie soup, ground turkey and veggie chili, cabbage rolls, turkey and veggie meatloaf and freeze those also. I like veggies, but don't like preparing them seperately, so I try to find dishes that mix them in

A typical day in food for me is:

Breakfast:
homemade muffin
piece of fruit
6 spears of asparagus wrapped with bacon

Lunch:
homemade muffin
piece of fruit
leftovers or one of the dishes above

Dinner:
steak, brussel sprouts, baked potato
one of the above meals
spaghetti squash, spaghetti sauce, frozen chicken breast in the crock pot
pull pork/beef over a salad or as a "dip" with organic veggie chips

a piece of fruit
dessert (1/4 of an organic chocolate bar 72% or higher, trail mix (nuts, seeds, choc chips, shaved coconut, dried fruit), coconut or almond milk ice cream

Suzanne 3FC
04-29-2013, 06:51 PM
At the time I read Wheat Belly, I had already been wheat and gluten free for almost a year. I didn't experience any of the changes the author claimed would happen after giving up wheat. I gave up gluten because of a digestive problem, but the author blamed wheat on a lot of other problems as well. It just wasn't so in my case. It also never had an impact on my weight in either direction.

I personally don't eat gluten free wheat substitutes. I don't eat any type of bread or baked products. I missed it at first, but it didnt' take long for me to get used to it. I used to eat gluten free pasta, such as quinoa pasta (really good), but even gave that up. I eat oats for breakfast sometimes, but I don't eat grains other than that.

Going completely gluten free is hard, especially if you feed a family that doesn't plan to avoid it. Gluten is hidden in so many products where wheat isn't a listed ingredient. Avoiding it when possible may be the best option.

Good luck :)


derrydaughter
04-30-2013, 08:12 AM
Ikes: Wow, can you share that muffin recipe? Sounds wonderful.

I appreciate help from anyone. Suzanne, I think you have done so very well.

I am trying to find my own way and it is hard sometimes.
I have a husband who is resistant to trying GF products, so I'm shopping "double" if that makes sense and our grocery bills are pretty expensive.
But, I am determined.

Ellen
04-30-2013, 10:44 PM
We eat gluten free because my husband is sensitive to wheat and gluten. I have not read that book. Guess I ought to. Because he eats gluten free, I do as well. We also do not eat corn, or eggs. Allergies to them as well. We do eat oatmeal, and I use almond flour a good bit for cooking. Tonight I used it and Veganaise (egg free) mayo to make oven 'fried' chicken tenders. For breakfast, we eat oats, or sometimes I will eat a gluten free multi seed English muffin with almond butter. My husband makes a smoothie with whey protein and milk with flax oil for breakfast, and eats oat bran muffins with it. For lunch my husband carries leftovers from dinner. I eat whatever. Usually something low carb, like some lean protein and some raw veggies. Dinner is a meat and a veggie and some kind of starch- like brown rice, or a baked sweet potato. I often skip the starch for blood sugar reasons. I try to avoid the gluten free alternatives you can buy. They are loaded with sugar and other stuff I don't want. I do occasionally make the psyllium bread with almond flour I found on the web. Its nice if you want a sandwich. We just don't very often because we do not eat processed meats, so its chicken salad usually, and its good without bread!

You have an uphill battle if there are family members who don't want to go GF. You probably should just do what you need to do for you, and don't try and convert the whole family. When my kids were still at home I just tried to have healthy alternatives for them, and what my husband and I needed for our special diet needs.

To save money, I highly recommend you go to the library and check out anything they have by Betty Hagman, and Carol Fenster. They have tons of books with good recipes in them. Also, check on the internet. I found a recipe for a gluten free biscuit mix (bisquick) that is really good and I can use it for biscuits, and for casseroles. No one knows its gluten free. I shy away from using too much of the starches, like tapioca, Arrowroot, and potato because they are very high in carbs and spike my blood sugar. You can mix up your own gluten free flour mix- its very easy, and much cheaper. There are many recipes and you just need to read up on what recipes they work best in and then find your taste preference.

It was not hard for us to go gluten free. It just took diligence in reading labels and a good bit of research. I would be happy to share recipes, and helpful web pages. Just let me know.

Novus
05-01-2013, 06:08 AM
The easiest and cheapest way to eat gluten free is to just avoid grains altogether. Eat protein, veggies, and fruit and forget the pasta/bread/etc. I've been wheat free since the first of the year and can't believe how much healthier I feel!

derrydaughter
05-01-2013, 06:53 AM
I am feeling healthier as well, my arthritis has been much improved and I don't seem to be getting as many headaches and other things have calmed down a bit. I have had repeated diverticulitis attacks and my quest for better health led me to try being gluten free.
I had been doing well losing weight before the attacks but they really threw me off. I am finding it easier to get back on track with some kind of weight loss efforts now and I am very pleased with that.

jazbcure
05-01-2013, 09:17 PM
At the time I read Wheat Belly, I had already been wheat and gluten free for almost a year. I didn't experience any of the changes the author claimed would happen after giving up wheat. I gave up gluten because of a digestive problem, but the author blamed wheat on a lot of other problems as well. It just wasn't so in my case. It also never had an impact on my weight in either direction.



Same with me. My digestion has gotten a lot better but my weight stayed exactly the same. I don't eat bread substitutes often but I do eat rice/potatos/corn. I feel like even thought the book is titled "Wheat Belly" it is really a low carb diet book in disguise.

derrydaughter
05-02-2013, 07:01 AM
First of all, congratulations to all of you for your great weight losses, I'm impressed that each person that has responded here has had tremendous weight loss success.
I am not only here to inspire myself to continue my weight loss journey, but to continue to be inspired on this wheat free choice I have made. Honestly, after more diverticulitis attacks than I can count, eating right and increasing my fiber and getting healthy just has to be the right thing for me.
It's hard, as we all know, there are temptations.
Have you all eaten out frequently and have you found gluten free choices easy to find at restaurants? Have they accommodated your requests?
We recently went to Florida. I ordered fish at a restaurant and asked specifically for the sauce to be on the side and it wasn't. I chose not to make a big stink about it as we were with other people and dinner was in front of us. If I had sent back my meal, they would have had to wait for me and it would have been uncomfortable for them. So, I scraped off as much as I could and just ate...
Some places bend over backwards and others just skate by...

derrydaughter
05-02-2013, 07:02 AM
First of all, congratulations to all of you for your great weight losses, I'm impressed that each person that has responded here has had tremendous weight loss success.
I am not only here to inspire myself to continue my weight loss journey, but to continue to be inspired on this wheat free choice I have made. Honestly, after more diverticulitis attacks than I can count, eating right and increasing my fiber and getting healthy just has to be the right thing for me.
It's hard, as we all know, there are temptations.
Have you all eaten out frequently and have you found gluten free choices easy to find at restaurants? Have they accommodated your requests?
We recently went to Florida. I ordered fish at a restaurant and asked specifically for the sauce to be on the side and it wasn't. It was grilled fish but it had a cream based sauce. I would have not eaten the sauce or maybe dipped my fork in it a couple of times. I chose not to make a big stink about it as we were with other people and dinner was in front of us. If I had sent back my meal, they would have had to wait for me and it would have been uncomfortable for them. So, I scraped off as much as I could and just ate...
Some places bend over backwards and others just skate by...

CanadianCutie
05-02-2013, 06:18 PM
Ikes: Wow, can you share that muffin recipe? Sounds wonderful.

I appreciate help from anyone. Suzanne, I think you have done so very well.

I am trying to find my own way and it is hard sometimes.
I have a husband who is resistant to trying GF products, so I'm shopping "double" if that makes sense and our grocery bills are pretty expensive.
But, I am determined.

As far as your husband, one way to ease into it is buy a good rice pasta. I buy Tinkyada brown rice pasta. You have to cook it a little longer than traditional pasta (15 to 17 mins for al dente spaghetti), but it tastes just regular pasta. My husband and father are both picky as far as pasta, and they both eat it no problem.

derrydaughter
05-03-2013, 06:57 AM
Cutie, that is a good point. But, we have a good solution in this house anyway to pasta. We all like to reheat pasta for lunches in this house, so I make two boxes when we have a pasta meal. One is regular and the other is GF. I like the quinoa pasta. I have found the rice pasta to be "gummy" but maybe I am not cooking it properly?

Wannabeskinny
05-06-2013, 08:17 AM
I'm not glute-free, I call myself gluten-light :) My doctor suggested that cut down drastically on the amount of wheat I was eating, not only for weight loss but for the inflammation it causes on joints, and an injury I've been nursing. It can be very difficult because I have a husband who's a pasta freak and a young toddler who needs to eat whole grains. It's been relatively easy going gluten free because I don't drastically reduce my carb intake. I eat a bit of rice which I find easy to control my portion sizes. I also have potatoes in small portions.

I have learned a great many things from controlling the amount of wheat I eat. First, I'm not as hungry as I used to be. For example, when I eat pasta in the evening I wake up the next morning hungry and craving bread. There was a time in my life when I thought I was hungry all the time, but the reality is that wheat makes me hungry hungry hungry!!! I certainly don't feel like that when I don't have wheat. So going gluten-light has made me realize that I'm not a weak-willed binger. It's wonderful!

derrydaughter
05-10-2013, 07:00 AM
Wanna be, I have also noted that my arthritis is considerably better when I have avoided gluten and I get less headaches. I am also finding that I am not as hungry all the time and raiding the cabinets. It is also easier to just eat fruit or one of those mozzarella cheese sticks that peel off like strings as a snack, which is healthier than cookies, pretzels and the like.
Janina, what type of rice noodles do you eat? I picked up some in the health food refrigerated section of my grocery store, where there are Asian foods and tofu and the like and when I opened the bag they were in to drain them (they came in some kind of liquid) I thought they smelled bad, kind of fishy. My son came over and sniffed and said we shouldn't eat them, so I tossed them. I was going to build an entire recipe around those and we ended up with a completely different meal. I wonder of those noodles always smell that way or not?
Yesterday I went out to lunch with a few friends, it was kind of a special occasion. I had gluten. Wondering if I will pay for it or if I'll just take it in stride? I do know that my calorie count for the day was way over yesterday. I did get on my treadmill to help offset that.

jazbcure
05-10-2013, 02:19 PM
I picked up some in the health food refrigerated section of my grocery store, where there are Asian foods and tofu and the like and when I opened the bag they were in to drain them (they came in some kind of liquid) I thought they smelled bad, kind of fishy. My son came over and sniffed and said we shouldn't eat them, so I tossed them. I was going to build an entire recipe around those and we ended up with a completely different meal. I wonder of those noodles always smell that way or not?

Those noodles always smell that way. If you rinse them the smell pretty much goes away.

I really tried to like those noodles since they are extremely low calorie but the texture/fishy smell just ruined them for me.

Munchy
05-16-2013, 02:25 PM
Janina, what type of rice noodles do you eat? I picked up some in the health food refrigerated section of my grocery store, where there are Asian foods and tofu and the like and when I opened the bag they were in to drain them (they came in some kind of liquid) I thought they smelled bad, kind of fishy. My son came over and sniffed and said we shouldn't eat them, so I tossed them. I was going to build an entire recipe around those and we ended up with a completely different meal. I wonder of those noodles always smell that way or not?

It sounds like you picked up shirataki noodles. Those aren't rice noodles, they're usually konnyaku.

This is how I eat them:
The trick is to have them in an Asian style noodle bowl - make a stir fry with a lot of veggies, maybe some protein, and add the rinsed and dried noodles with some broth and strong stir fry sauces (hoisin, sriracha, oyster, etc), and finish with scallion and cilantro or Thai basil/mint. I sometimes like to top mine with a poached egg - they're similar to ramen. I wouldn't, for example, top them with marinara or cheese. That flavor doesn't fit with these noodle for me.

http://lh3.ggpht.com/_OaYG005JPDs/S5bLgr0-lmI/AAAAAAAAA9Y/Xj0eigc2ki8/Quick%20Ramen%20Bowl%20yolk.jpg

If you don't like the texture, you can take the rinsed and dried noodles and spray a nonstick skillet with some oil spray, then crisp them slightly so you end up with something like Hong Kong crispy noodles.


I buy rice noodles from my Asian grocery that look like this:
http://cornerstore.fooducopia.com/uploads/products/originals/0000000475.jpg and I eat them pretty much the same way as the shirataki - stir fry, or noodle bowl.

For a pasta "substitute" I like to peel zucchini all the way down until it's noodle shaped. Then I saute it until tender and top it with marinara/pesto/cheese sauce/etc.

https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRSY8MuzdGfZ4Ug6Wo4Uyb3dC9eLQt9i oocwuIJj2ZINN7nlPkVsg

kaplods
05-16-2013, 06:14 PM
I also had been on a low-grain wheat and gluten free WOE (way of eating) when I read Wheat Belly. I follow a semi-paleo diet that doesn't conform to any mass-marketed plans. I started with a conventional low-carb diet and noticed many of my chronic health issues improved drastically or even dissappeared. some of these issues I've lived with since childhood. I then started experimenting with my diet to determine whether carbs or specific carbs causing symptoms. I discovered that carb-level are important, but some carbs affect me much drastically than others (wheat and refined sugar being the worst symptom triggers).

Semi-paleo is the best way to describe my food plan. I don't always eat 100% paleo or even 100% to my own plan, but I am careful about avoiding wheat and gluten grains . Thankfully, I don't have celiac disease, so I don't have to worry about trace amounts of gluten grains (for example the amount of wheat in soy sauce doesn't seem to bother me, of course I'm not using soy sauce all that frequently.