100 lb. Club - Temptation While Shopping




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Alyssa Autopsy
04-25-2013, 02:22 PM
I know i'm not the only one...
I go to buy my granola bars (oats and honey, not the chocolate-dipped ones that are still basically crap) and the shelves opposite them are full of cookies.

Across from my sugar-free preservative-free honey-sweetened yoghurt is ice cream in buckets and bars.

The cereal aisle also hold bags of candy, from lollipops and kit kat bars to caramels and ferero rocher and everything inbetween.

To get to the rolls for your turkey burgers, you have to walk past cakes and donuts.

And what's next to the egg whites? Bacon!!




I seriously am starting to hate grocery shopping, especially as my local grocer's has a hot food bar. I always smell the fried chicken when i'm there. And the mac and cheese. *drooooooooool* So. Not. Fair!



Is your grocer's set up as temptingly as mine? Do you have to walk past thousands of calories worth of yummies just to get to the most basic of necessities? What do you do when you're faced with temptation, which is usually cheaper than the healthy stuff? Do you notice that the junk is usually cheaper than the good stuff? (Example: 7 days worth of chocolate bars in a bag = about $1.50, 1 days worth of fresh raspberries = $3.50+)


Teresa66
04-25-2013, 02:30 PM
Yes and it's disgusting! I am truly blessed that my very disciplined husband usually does the weekly shopping, so I am not subjected. I did go with him yesterday and commented more than once in how easy it is to just remain fat with so many bad choices to choose from. I did have my Weight Watcher scanner, which really did motivate me to make the smartest choices I could.

Alyssa Autopsy
04-25-2013, 02:52 PM
Yes and it's disgusting! I am truly blessed that my very disciplined husband usually does the weekly shopping, so I am not subjected. I did go with him yesterday and commented more than once in how easy it is to just remain fat with so many bad choices to choose from. I did have my Weight Watcher scanner, which really did motivate me to make the smartest choices I could.

well i have food stamps so i kinda have to do the shopping. last time i let my bf borrow it to buy some bread and milk, he also came home with a $15 container of protein powder he "couldn't resist" because it was on sale... and i only get $200 a month so spending $25 dollars on him thinking it would only be $10 kinda annoys me. and my grandmother is hopeless when it comes to credit cards and stuff. but if i have something written on the list that my grandmother knows which brand i prefer (nature valley granola bars instead of quaker oats, for instance) she'll get it for me. i'm also loving fiber one brownies but i can't find them at my local grocer's, so thats one less chocolate substance i'm having in the day. in fact i'm in a pretty irritable mood today as i have no chocolate. now i can't stop chain-smoking and staring at the semi-sweet chocolate chips and the pancake mix xP if i had a ride to a store that accepted food stamps right now, i'd probably buy $20 of chocolate.


wolfgirl69
04-25-2013, 03:00 PM
When I go shopping with my mom it's the cookies and chips that drive me nuts. I don't think PERSONALLY that it's wrong to have a little junk food in your life-just not your entire diet. I was a picky eater as a kid so all I ate was junk. I am just now liking veggies and fruits but i am not in the habit of eating them. I am trying to integrate them into my diet. And while I have cut out the junk completely it's only temporary-I plan to add a little bit of junk food into my diet when I gain back my self control.

But to answer your question YES! OMG THE JUNK FOOD DRIVES ME CRAZY! My mom is nice enough to try to avoid those sections if possible and if not then go in and go out quickly to get what we need. I don't eat much these days though so lol I don't need much.

Alyssa Autopsy
04-25-2013, 03:03 PM
When I go shopping with my mom it's the cookies and chips that drive me nuts. I don't think PERSONALLY that it's wrong to have a little junk food in your life-just not your entire diet. I was a picky eater as a kid so all I ate was junk. I am just now liking veggies and fruits but i am not in the habit of eating them. I am trying to integrate them into my diet. And while I have cut out the junk it's only temporary-I plan to add a little bit of junk food into my diet when I gain back my self control.

But to answer your question YES! OMG THE JUNK FOOD DRIVES ME CRAZY! My mom is nice enough to try to avoid those sections if possible and if not then go in and go out quickly to get what we need. I don't eat much these days though so lol I don't need much.
i see nothing wrong with a little junk either, it's just the ridiculousness of TEMPTATION TEMPTATION EVERYWHERE. and sometimes it's hard to not eat a whole box of oreos at a time. "oh i'll just have 2 oreos with a 1/2 cup of milk" turns into "damnit i ate 13 oreos and i still want more chocolate" or at least that's how it is with me. the only "junk" i really eat anymore is bacon and chocolate, though i do have stuff like pizza or fries on occasion.

Keep Moving Forward
04-25-2013, 03:46 PM
I've found that the stores I shop at the most tend to keep the healthier stuff at the ends of the aisles & that makes it way easier for me to resist the cookies, marshmallows, ice cream, etc. But even at the health food store, I still have to resist a lot of stuff!

Last week, I seriously had a staring contest with a package of peanut butter oreos in the middle of a Brookshires, & I totally won. :)

lunarsongbird
04-25-2013, 03:51 PM
i see nothing wrong with a little junk either, it's just the ridiculousness of TEMPTATION TEMPTATION EVERYWHERE.

I've mentioned this in a post before too. It's like the "world" doesn't want you to succeed. The grocery stores are full of garbage. The portions at restaurants are ENORMOUS. There is a fast food chain on every corner.

We live in a place that seems to encourage unhealthy habits.
I wonder if this .gif will work...
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/mt/assets/food/obesity-map-GIF-jh.gif

lunarsongbird
04-25-2013, 03:55 PM
So I just shop at natural grocery store, where I don't have to be subjected to the bright bags of chips and candy.

Alyssa Autopsy
04-25-2013, 03:57 PM
So I just shop at natural grocery store, where I don't have to be subjected to the bright bags of chips and candy.you're lucky, if you're close to one. it's a 40-minute drive to the nearest Whole Foods, and Shoprite is only 15 minutes away by bike. plus, Whole Foods is more expensive and i only get $200 a month for food.

Silverfire
04-25-2013, 04:04 PM
Stores are set up like that on purpose and it works very well for them! If you shop at the larger chain places, its best to stick to the outside rim. Produce, meats and dairy are all out there. I know you still gotta make the trek to those aisles to get your granola bars and stuff, and when I have to do that, I will sometimes leave my cart at the end of the row, book it to the thing I need and book it back! Less chance to fill my cart with junk that way :D

MMM Bacon. Here is a tip that I just learned and thought was pretty brilliant. Next time you buy a package of bacon spread it all out on wax paper (so all of your slices are separated) and fold it up and keep it in the freezer. That way when you need some bacon you can just take out the slice or two or three that you need and are less tempted to cook (and then eat) the whole package (I may have done that at least once)

I was going to suggest farmers markets if they are open in your area, but I realizes that they probably wouldn't take food stamps :(

As for the healthy stuff being more expensive... you just kinda gotta decide if you are willing to pay a little more to be healthy... Also, learning to find what is "in season" helps, as those things will generally be less expensive that those that are not in season. (Raspberries are some of the most expensive I find... Strawberries IMO are the best bet! Better bang for you buck I think)

ETA - MAKE A LIST AND STICK TO IT! - that is one of the biggest helps for me.

Good luck :D

Alyssa Autopsy
04-25-2013, 04:50 PM
Stores are set up like that on purpose and it works very well for them! If you shop at the larger chain places, its best to stick to the outside rim. Produce, meats and dairy are all out there. I know you still gotta make the trek to those aisles to get your granola bars and stuff, and when I have to do that, I will sometimes leave my cart at the end of the row, book it to the thing I need and book it back! Less chance to fill my cart with junk that way :D

MMM Bacon. Here is a tip that I just learned and thought was pretty brilliant. Next time you buy a package of bacon spread it all out on wax paper (so all of your slices are separated) and fold it up and keep it in the freezer. That way when you need some bacon you can just take out the slice or two or three that you need and are less tempted to cook (and then eat) the whole package (I may have done that at least once)

I was going to suggest farmers markets if they are open in your area, but I realizes that they probably wouldn't take food stamps :(

As for the healthy stuff being more expensive... you just kinda gotta decide if you are willing to pay a little more to be healthy... Also, learning to find what is "in season" helps, as those things will generally be less expensive that those that are not in season. (Raspberries are some of the most expensive I find... Strawberries IMO are the best bet! Better bang for you buck I think)

ETA - MAKE A LIST AND STICK TO IT! - that is one of the biggest helps for me.

Good luck :D
ah im pretty good with the bacon, i'll only have a slice at a time. the freezer idea sounds good though.

and yeah, theres a farmers market less than 2 miles away from me, but they don't take food stamps.

Moving Forward
04-25-2013, 07:24 PM
I totally hear you! The grocery store I shop at is designed to entice me left and right (or so it feels). I have used several strategies including sending my hubby and buying my groceries online. When I have to go to the store, I make sure that I've eaten and am full before going in. I then buy only things that are on my list. And the list always includes my Skinny Cows so that I don't feel totally deprived. Good luck to you.

rodeogirl
04-25-2013, 07:30 PM
I'm a big believer in shopping around the perimeter of the store. If I have to go to an interior aisle I try to get in and out as fast as possible. I kind of make a game out of it.

I also am happy to have a Trader Joes between work and home - i find it much easier to stay healthy there.

merilung
04-25-2013, 08:06 PM
I generally don't have an issue with this - we ate 100% organic vegan for so long that I just ceased to see the processed crap as food. Like others have said, I shop around the outside of a conventional grocery store - I hit up produce, meat, eggs, and I'm done. I think the only things I've had to go down aisles for are olives and spices.

I don't mind axing food that doesn't fit in my budget and shopping for the produce that's on sale - no way would I buy raspberries at $3+! I also don't look at the prices of things I don't intend to buy - it doesn't really matter to me if nutella is cheaper than almond butter, since I'm not going to buy it and eat it even if it's a quarter a jar.

lunarsongbird
04-25-2013, 08:35 PM
I just ceased to see the processed crap as food.

Truth.

newleaf123
04-25-2013, 08:42 PM
I walk through the store reminding myself that it's not in the store's best interest for me to lose weight, and that I alone am responsible for keeping my best interests in mind.

The proliferation of junk food everywhere you turn really bothers me on an intellectual level. Yeah, it's no wonder there's an obesity epidemic!

SuperHeroTeacher
04-25-2013, 08:44 PM
I'm so lucky, my local grocery store has a personal shopping service. I submit my order online and pull up to a reserved spot right in front of the store; my shopper brings the groceries out, puts them in the car and I pay her.

I was a little leery at first - a friend has had bad experiences with Safeway delivery. I have to say all of the produce the shopper picked or me was PERFECT! She may have been even mor picky than me (which is saying something).

I only tried it because I couldn't bear to go shopping my first week on Medifast and your first 5 orders are free. After that orders are free if you spend over $100, or it's a fee of $4.95 for orders under$100. It is so convenient I'll never grocery shop again! Plus, a $5 fee is NOTHING compared to the extra $ I spend on crap if I actually go into the store. Not to mention the 45 minutes it would take me to shop is worth more than $5...

Roo2
04-25-2013, 08:53 PM
I guess I am just a Weirdo But I love Grocery Shopping !:D Went today to Costco bring my shaker in go over to Soda Machine get Ice and Water and shook up my CranGranata drink as I shopped and walked by the free samples ...as was as fine as from hair spilt 3 ways:D!

I think it is all about your mindset....dieting is so much a mental game.:dizzy:

I enjoy seeing all the new items ,got my family their favorites Home Run Inn frozen Pizza and the other snacks they like!
I realize food that I can not have in life surrounds us in the world ....it does not scare or bother me ....Cuz my Mantra is this is not for you:D and I am reprogramming my brain:).

Learning to live a new normal is not easy ...but if you are willing to truly commit to the process it becomes a part of who you are:hug:
Good Luck,as we all strive to our desired goals,Roo2:carrot::carrot::carrot:

Alyssa Autopsy
04-25-2013, 09:19 PM
I generally don't have an issue with this - we ate 100% organic vegan for so long that I just ceased to see the processed crap as food. Like others have said, I shop around the outside of a conventional grocery store - I hit up produce, meat, eggs, and I'm done. I think the only things I've had to go down aisles for are olives and spices.

I don't mind axing food that doesn't fit in my budget and shopping for the produce that's on sale - no way would I buy raspberries at $3+! I also don't look at the prices of things I don't intend to buy - it doesn't really matter to me if nutella is cheaper than almond butter, since I'm not going to buy it and eat it even if it's a quarter a jar.
well thats the price raspberries are around me... i live in new jersey, ti's expensive here. a single kohlrabi cost my grandmother $2.50 the other day... and we used the whole thing between 2 salads (we eat very big salads with lots of veggies. i usually put a whole tomato and a whole cucumber in my salad)

merilung
04-25-2013, 09:37 PM
well thats the price raspberries are around me... i live in new jersey, ti's expensive here. a single kohlrabi cost my grandmother $2.50 the other day... and we used the whole thing between 2 salads (we eat very big salads with lots of veggies. i usually put a whole tomato and a whole cucumber in my salad)

Yup, I know food can be pricey depending on your region - I've lived a bit of everywhere at this point, and it's not uncommon to see them priced at $3+ here in Saint Louis. Personally, I would go without raspberries rather than pay that much for a teeny container and find another produce item that's more affordable. We tend to focus on veggies first, and then buy fruit IF we have money left over and there's something we like that fits within our budget. Produce sales also tend to align with what's in season, so buying what's cheapest often gets you the best quality stuff!

Gardening and farmer's market seconds have also made a HUGE difference in the quality of my diet in really lean times. When we had a little more money, we got a CSA subscription, which was a great money saver as well.

Alyssa Autopsy
04-25-2013, 11:42 PM
Yup, I know food can be pricey depending on your region - I've lived a bit of everywhere at this point, and it's not uncommon to see them priced at $3+ here in Saint Louis. Personally, I would go without raspberries rather than pay that much for a teeny container and find another produce item that's more affordable. We tend to focus on veggies first, and then buy fruit IF we have money left over and there's something we like that fits within our budget. Produce sales also tend to align with what's in season, so buying what's cheapest often gets you the best quality stuff!

Gardening and farmer's market seconds have also made a HUGE difference in the quality of my diet in really lean times. When we had a little more money, we got a CSA subscription, which was a great money saver as well.
We live in a condo so no garden, and we're not allowed to hang stuff so the topsy-turvy tomato planter isn't an option either. also farmer markets don't accept my food stamps








I'm so lucky, my local grocery store has a personal shopping service. I submit my order online and pull up to a reserved spot right in front of the store; my shopper brings the groceries out, puts them in the car and I pay her.

I was a little leery at first - a friend has had bad experiences with Safeway delivery. I have to say all of the produce the shopper picked or me was PERFECT! She may have been even mor picky than me (which is saying something).

I only tried it because I couldn't bear to go shopping my first week on Medifast and your first 5 orders are free. After that orders are free if you spend over $100, or it's a fee of $4.95 for orders under$100. It is so convenient I'll never grocery shop again! Plus, a $5 fee is NOTHING compared to the extra $ I spend on crap if I actually go into the store. Not to mention the 45 minutes it would take me to shop is worth more than $5...
same issue as above, i only have food stamps. that'll pay for the groceries, but i don't have the $$$ for the charge... food stamps are my ONLY income, i'm trying to get onto Disability for my mental illnesses but my hearing date won't even be scheduled for another 9 months.

merilung
04-25-2013, 11:56 PM
Alyssa - what area of NJ are you in? Some of my buddies from the co-op I used to work with are heavily involved in farmer's markets coalitions - my old farmer's market did accept food stamps, I could see if anyone there knows of one near you that does! Farmer's markets seconds are often totally free if you go at the end of the day - they'd rather get rid of a case of not-perfect tomatoes than let them rot. Even when I was really active in the organic/natural food scene, I was always learning about new ways to access healthy food - they can be so easy to miss! If you have a food co-op near you, they often take food stamps as well and many will waive membership fees for low income folks. There also might be a community garden near you - they're popping up all over the place these days.

When I lived in a teeny condo I did a lot of container gardening in my kitchen. I started off with free containers (old soda bottles cut in half, big plastic bins that I picked up by a dumpster one time, reusable grocery bags that were on their last leg) though I did eventually pick up some super cheap pots from craigslist.

Fit dad 2b
04-26-2013, 12:12 AM
I'm a big believer in shopping around the perimeter of the store...

I noticed that the newly built grocery store I started shopping at has gotten a little wise to this. The chips are on a long wall perpendicular all the aisles, creating a "chip perimeter".

Alyssa Autopsy
04-26-2013, 12:29 AM
Alyssa - what area of NJ are you in? Some of my buddies from the co-op I used to work with are heavily involved in farmer's markets coalitions - my old farmer's market did accept food stamps, I could see if anyone there knows of one near you that does! Farmer's markets seconds are often totally free if you go at the end of the day - they'd rather get rid of a case of not-perfect tomatoes than let them rot. Even when I was really active in the organic/natural food scene, I was always learning about new ways to access healthy food - they can be so easy to miss! If you have a food co-op near you, they often take food stamps as well and many will waive membership fees for low income folks. There also might be a community garden near you - they're popping up all over the place these days.

When I lived in a teeny condo I did a lot of container gardening in my kitchen. I started off with free containers (old soda bottles cut in half, big plastic bins that I picked up by a dumpster one time, reusable grocery bags that were on their last leg) though I did eventually pick up some super cheap pots from craigslist.
we don't have the room for gardening indoor *sweat* there's 3 adults and a cat in this place, we actually just have boxes stacked all over the place from lack of room, and i keep my clothes in piles on the floor because i have no empty drawers to put them in. and the bathroom has 2 doors, but one is blocked on both sides- one side by a shelf, the other side by a dresser, a table, and a bunch of boxes x.x we can barely even cook because of the lack of counter space.

i'm in Middlesex County, i live a few miles from East Brunswick

shcirerf
04-26-2013, 12:32 AM
Grocery shopping!

It can be the devil, or you can conquer!

I actually live in a small place, in the middle of God's no where! I garden, I'm lucky, I have 100 acres! And a 3000 sq ft garden.

I raise as much as I can, however the weather sometimes, is not on board with my plans. :devil: 2 years ago, we had 6 hail storms, does not do much for the garden.

Last year, I put in 24 mater plants, 20 pepper plants, 2 long rows of potatoes, Zukes, eggplant, summer squash, beets, radishes, carrots, Kentucky Wonder Beans, Cherokee wax beans, okra, a variety of other melons and squash, spinach, several varieties of lettuce, and probably some stuff I don't even remember.

Then, we went from winter to summer! It was 110 degrees here, on June 10? Who knew? Zukes, stalled and died, maters did not set on, all cool season crops, bust!

However, for the first time in a long time, I had a melon crop! Amazing! And the carrots and Yellow Cherokee beans grew like they were on roids! Go figure?

Anywho, if I remember correctly and the rules have not changed, you can buy garden seeds with food stamps. I realize, that not all of us live in a place with a lot of space, but container gardening has lots of options. "Google" pallet gardening. Folks do amazing things!

I'm actually surprised, given technology, that more farmers markets are unwilling or unable to accept food stamps, (around here, aka, EBT card)

There is an app for that. It was discussed 2 weeks ago at a Women in Ag conference, I attended, put on by the University of Nebraska.

As far as general grocery shopping goes and looking for deals, it does not really matter if you live in a small or big area. Talk to the folks that work there. Shop the outside aisles. Rarely does any good come from venturing in to any other place!

All stores put certain things on sale at certain times, depending on outdates. Granted, you might have to go shopping at 5 a.m. on Sunday morning, but the deals are there. This is where, talking to the folks that work there, is a good thing!

merilung
04-26-2013, 01:14 AM
I garden, I'm lucky, I have 100 acres! And a 3000 sq ft garden.

SO. MUCH. GARDEN. ENVY.

I think I just turned green with jealousy. You should totally take a picture of your super huge garden so that I might live vicariously through you!

Arctic Mama
04-26-2013, 02:42 AM
I'm absolutely with Merilung. That stuff is not what I eat. It's not food for me. No conflict, no struggle, no temptation, because I'm at peace with that fact. So I walk past it, tacitly and detached lay observe the labels, take an appreciative sniff and say that 'yes, that's nice'. And then I move on and don't give it another thought.

It's a mental game, and food is only a temptation if you ALLOW yourself to be tempted. Enjoying your current way of eating helps so much, but it doesn't go all the way. Being iron-clad committed to the right choices for your body means there is NO mental wiggle room for justifying things that aren't in that choice subset (and if the occasional treat is in that subset, plan it out accordingly and don't let yourself see that random junk as a viable option if it really isn't).

We get into trouble when we allow ourselves to fall into thinking, consciously or otherwise, that we deserve that treat or could eat it. Then we fixate on it and it becomes 'temptation'.

The solution? Nip that crud in the bud right away by resolving yourself. Then there is no thought, no choice, no hemming or hawwing or imagining how much you'd like to eat it (or how good it might taste and ooooh, wouldn't I love a bite?!). Stop that thought pattern that leads to those desires when you look t junk BEFORE it starts. It takes practice, but in the end it isn't our ability to hold a stiff upper lip while really wanting to give in that makes us succeed - that willpower is finite. It takes reframing the entire thought process, so you don't even start down the path of needing to resist, that will likely prove most successful.

See, I don't need to be strong to turn down a dessert at Christmas, every bread basket, and my previous favorite candy and ice cream. Strength fails. I just know, at the core of my being, that I am beyond the time when I could eat and enjoy those and now do things different, period. End of discussion. Moving on.

And I tell you, it sounds silly but it works brilliantly! Almost like magic, in terms of the great mental burden it can remove from the process of losing weight.

Alyssa Autopsy
04-26-2013, 06:38 AM
eh guys im sorry but the advice im getting just isnt going to work for me. first of all, you're telling someone with an eating disorder to stop eating specific things, don't you know that restrictive eating is one of the problems with eating disorders? first you cut out chocolate, then no red meat during the week, suddenly you're only eating things that are 50 calories or less (like half an apple) per every hour because you're afraid to go over. and i seriously don't have the room for gardening.


i don't know if this is the right site for me, because the dieting has triggered me and i've pretty much relapsed. and even the eating disorder site isn't good for me, because of the rules about numbers... i need to discuss my issues full-on, and my ED posts here get locked, and i've already been admonished for my "content" multiple times on the site. i need somewhere where i can ***** and moan about (in the past) being a size 0 and making myself throw up, and now being a 14 and wanting to again. but my posts on both sites keep getting deleted or edited. (case in point, my word has been changed to ***** when all i'm saying is "female dog". I DON'T WANT TO BE CENSORED!)

i think i just need to call my psychiatrist's emergency number once it's a decent hour (it's not even 6 am, my cat woke me up at 5 by attacking my foot =_=) because i. am. freaking. out.

Arctic Mama
04-26-2013, 07:44 AM
We're not psychiatrists, we're random strangers on the Internet friendly enough to try and help you out as best we can. If a paid professional is what you need, please do take that route. We are in no way comparable and it's a bit unfair to try and make it so when we're doing this out if kindness and for free.

Nobody here can solve your problems, we can ONLY offer advice. Advice, I might add, that seems to be met largely by excuses (on this thread, at least). You asked a question and got answers, even if they weren't workable. Would it not be slightly more appreciative and friendly to be grateful for help rather than chastise everyone for not being helpful 'enough'?

Similarly, this is someone else's private site, moderated and managed by them and extended to the users as a privilege/courtesy. They pay the bills, they make the rules. While I don't always agree with every moderator decision, it is their right to make them for whatever reason they seem necessary. In the case of disordered eating and related content, if they see something as inappropriate and triggering and remove it, is it not their right?

3FC may not be the right fit for you - if you don't want the (sometimes less than helpful) help of strangers or to abide by another individuals rules. That's perfectly okay! Communities with less/no moderation and individuals who know your situation better and are compensated for their credentials may be just what is needed and if that is the case - may all go well with you!

Daimere
04-26-2013, 08:13 AM
eh guys im sorry but the advice im getting just isnt going to work for me. first of all, you're telling someone with an eating disorder to stop eating specific things, don't you know that restrictive eating is one of the problems with eating disorders? first you cut out chocolate, then no red meat during the week, suddenly you're only eating things that are 50 calories or less (like half an apple) per every hour because you're afraid to go over.

I'm sorry you're not getting the answers you are wanting/needing. Honestly though sometimes with losing weight there is a fine line between ED and healthy weight loss. I remember a few years ago there was a thread about it.

I really think books or podcasts from Full-Filled would help you a bit. She used to be a binger. She never really advocates eliminating foods. I used some of her techniques years ago which has helped my binging go down dramatically. http://www.reneemethod.com/fulfilled/. You could find the book at the library (or ask them to get it for you!) or listen to her podcasts. I also mainly stick to the outside of the stores. I rarely go inside aisles and I try to not look around if I do. I'm on a mission for my health. Also they say go to the store on a full stomach. I know when I'm hungry, I add more sugary stuffs to my basket than I normally do.

I still fully recommend talking to your doctor. This is just the internet. They don't know your issues and your obstacles. Your doctor may be the best person to talk to. Although good luck on your journey. *hug*

punkrocksong
04-26-2013, 09:31 AM
This may sound tedious, but I've been planning my meals a week in advance and making a list and only buying what's on the list. The only exception is in the health section - which is "conveniently" located in between the ice cream and the booze. Aside from a couple of Healthy Choice "All Natural" meals I haven't bought anything that comes in a box. I've been making my own everything...which again can be tedious, especially when I'm not used to cooking.

It can be tough when you are on a budget too. I feel it's a little messed up that in this land of plenty called America it is so much cheaper to buy food that is bad for you than it is to eat healthy. The stuff for Hamburger Helper is what...$5.00, while the ingredients to for me to make homemade spaghetti sauce with spaghetti squash came to almost $20.00. I've been trying to make things that will stretch for several days which offsets the more expensive ingredients.

There is nothing wrong with having a little junk food here and there as long as you are in a place where you think you can control how much you are eating. I was at the store last week and I almost picked up these WW carrot cakes. I picked up the box, discovered it weighed less than a pound and figured I would probably eat the entire box in less than a day - so I put it back. I am not in a place yet where I can casually eat junk food.

Alyssa Autopsy
04-26-2013, 09:40 AM
thanks guys

i'm not trying to make excuses, and to me they are reasons, not excuses.

but i think i need pro help now
i like to talk to people about my issues, but i can't seem to find anyone who can relate =/

merilung
04-26-2013, 01:52 PM
I don't really advocate restricting food, I'm just laying out what works for me, which does include restricting food groups and certainly cutting out super-processed "food" devoid of any nutritional benefit. I also had an eating disorder when I was younger (and lost well over 100 pounds through very, very unhealthy disordered habits) but I don't find that restricting myself to whole foods triggers me. Personally, moving on to a whole foods way of life helped me move beyond the guilt/binge/restrict cycle of disordered eating, and I strongly suspect that getting adequate nutrition for the first time in a long time did wonders for my mental state. It's worth noting that I did not lose weight on whole foods alone - I actually gained 50 pounds when I first transitioned to a vegan diet (which I no longer eat, for other reasons) - but I do think I reaped a ton of health benefits, including mental health benefits, from rewiring myself to see processed junk food as something inedible. There are many ladies here who are developing a healthy lifestyle that includes peanut butter cups and potato chips and ice cream in moderation, and I think it's wonderful if it works for them, it just doesn't work for me.

Obviously, you are the only person who can know what behaviors trigger disordered eating for you, and you shouldn't try to follow any plan that you don't feel will help you develop a healthy lifestyle.

If you feel that seeing a professional will help you (and honestly, I feel like seeing a professional is helpful to most folks! I would SO be seeing a counselor on a regular basis just to help me cope with life if I could afford it!) then certainly do the things you need to do to set that up.

I also dislike some of the censorship that happens on this site and if it were my forum I certainly wouldn't be bleeping out curse words - but as Arctic Mama brings up, this is a private website that we're allowed to use (for free!) as a courtesy. Someone else's house, someone else's rules.

I get that you don't feel like your making excuses, and that road-blocks can seem very, very daunting while we're experiencing them, but from what you've written out it sounds like you're going to need to re-work a lot of factors in your life to be successful on the road to a healthy lifestyle. If you have severe income restrictions that are unlikely to improve, then you're going to need to find ways to do things on the cheap/for free. There's a lot of ways to do that, but you're going to have to figure out what works for you and then potentially network with folks who already know how to do it - dumpster diving, container gardening, farmer's market/co-op seconds. Here (http://www.foodnotbombs.net/newjersey.html) is a list of Food Not Bombs groups in New Jersey - they often get all of their ingredients for free and are likely to know more about the outside-the-lines food scene in your area than I do, and you can get free healthy food at their events. If you don't have room to cook and move in your house, y'all might want to consider reducing the amount of things you own. There's also a number of websites devoted to DIY organization for small spaces that you could browse for ideas - even screwing (free!) milk crates into your walls to store folded clothes, stuff taking up counter space, etc. would potentially give you a lot more space.

Farmer's Markets in your area that accept EBT: The closest farmer's market I found to East Brunswick is Von Thuns County Farmer's Market in Monmouth Junction - Z Food Farm in Lawrenceville, West Orange Farmer's Market in West Orange, Wednesdays at Washington Park in Newark, are also in your area-ish. There's a link under the photo on this (http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/ebt/fm.htm) page that lists farmer's markets across the country that accept food stamps, in case anyone else is interested!

Keep Moving Forward
04-26-2013, 05:00 PM
thanks guys

i'm not trying to make excuses, and to me they are reasons, not excuses.

but i think i need pro help now
i like to talk to people about my issues, but i can't seem to find anyone who can relate =/

Have you looked into ED support groups/group counseling in your area? They're typically free & could help you find someone(s) who better understands what you're going through. Maybe a professional could help you find a group.

Novus
04-26-2013, 11:39 PM
Do you have a food bank/food giveaway type place near you? The one where I live is very flexible; if you say you need food, they give you food. And the vendors from the farmers market donate their produce at the end of the day to the food giveaway place. There are also a few churches in the area that do a community garden - you volunteer a few hours a week to work in the garden and you take home a basket of veggies.

There's got to be a lot of ways to stretch your food dollar and get heaps of healthy stuff!

Alyssa Autopsy
04-27-2013, 12:14 AM
Have you looked into ED support groups/group counseling in your area? They're typically free & could help you find someone(s) who better understands what you're going through. Maybe a professional could help you find a group.i found one support group so far and it's $50 a week.





Do you have a food bank/food giveaway type place near you? The one where I live is very flexible; if you say you need food, they give you food. And the vendors from the farmers market donate their produce at the end of the day to the food giveaway place. There are also a few churches in the area that do a community garden - you volunteer a few hours a week to work in the garden and you take home a basket of veggies.

There's got to be a lot of ways to stretch your food dollar and get heaps of healthy stuff!
i have no idea where to find a food bank within walking distance of my house,
in fact i don't know of any food banks less than 20 minutes away by car. and the one i did go to once required proof that i had no income, which, of course, i have no idea how to provide that information. there is one church by me and it has no garden, just a preschool. i try to buy only things on sale, but it's hard because i'll be looking at my 90-calorie-a-bar granola bars for $4, while the 200-plus-calorie-chocolate-chip bars are on sale for $2.50... and i tried buying some kohlrabi the other day, but even my grandma said "put it back" because they were $2.50 each and they weren't even very big. and i've mentioned earlier, the farmer market by me does not accept food stamps. luckily we constantly have tomatoes and mushrooms, but they're all mushy and half-bad, because my friend's mom keeps buying massive amounts of them on sale (we think she's starting to go a bit off, just a week ago she bought THIRTEEN packages of mushrooms and NINE of tomatoes, with about 7 tomatoes per package). she gives them all to my friend, her daughter, and she gets overwhelmed and gives them out to the neighbors because she is not physically capable of eating all of them before they go bad. i eat the ones that are okay if i have a BLT or a salad, but more than half of them are usually quite moldy. my grandmother cuts off the moldy parts and liquefies the rest and makes it into tomato sauce for pasta sauce and soups. now, i love mushrooms, but i'm actually to the point where i am SICK of them, i've been eating them so much. on spaghetti, in lasagna, topping steaks and pizza, or even just pan-fried in olive oil. so, yeah, i always have tomatoes and mushrooms, it's the raspberries and blueberries and cherries and strawberries and peaches etc etc etc that really get me. i love fruit, you're supposed to eat fruit, yet they make it so. damn. expensive. i can buy a package of chicken that will last 2 days for 2 people for the same price as one cup of raspberries, which i will eat slowly, but still eat the whole thing within the half hour. it's just not fair. and i WANT to eat organic, but that's more expensive. i accidentally bought organic milk for my bf once, and i was expecting to pay $3.50ish, and ended up paying nearly $6.

IanG
04-27-2013, 12:27 AM
Make a list. And stick to it. I go shopping and buy what's on the list. I hate grocery shopping so the shorter the list, the better!

Even obvious things we need e.g. milk, don't get bought unless they are on the list.

You can imagine the arguments when I get home!

punkrocksong
04-27-2013, 08:58 AM
Alyssa...I can relate to where you are coming from to an extent. When I was in school full time and working part time and my husband was laid off we had extremely limited resources when it came to food. Even though we were well below the poverty line for close to year I didn't qualify for food stamps because I was a full-time college student and I didn't work enough hours to qualify - which seemed silly because if I was able to work more hours I wouldn't need the food stamps. And that's part of the reason I gained so much weight. I formed some really unhealthy eating habits because of the financial stress I was under and my inability to buy good food. It can be very frustrating trying to stretch $200 over the course of a month.

If food banks and farmers markets are out, have you thought of maybe starting your own garden in your back yard if that's an option. I live in a townhouse in a very urban city where a garden isn't really an option, but my parents have one and they love it. They grow tomatoes, beans, strawberries, potatoes, and my Mom wants to plant an apple tree this year. It gives my parents who are retired something active to do and they are rewarded with healthy food in return. I know that doesn't solve your problem right now, but it's an idea for the future.

With your limited resources I would again stress the importance of lists - I use them for everything from shopping to housework. Maybe try buying your monthly staple foods in bulk so you always have them on hand. If you can't afford fresh or frozen veggies canned veggies are pretty cheap and you can get them now with no salt added. Canned fruit with no sugar added is also a lot cheaper than fresh. All natural peanut butter is more expensive, but it is so much better for you and peanut butter streches for quite awhile if you use it in moderation. Iceberg lettuce, while not ideal for nutrition, is pretty cheap and so are apples and they keep for awhile.

Really, just trying to stay away from processed foods like Hamburger Helper and frozen pizzas will make a big difference.

Alyssa Autopsy
04-27-2013, 10:31 AM
Alyssa...I can relate to where you are coming from to an extent. When I was in school full time and working part time and my husband was laid off we had extremely limited resources when it came to food. Even though we were well below the poverty line for close to year I didn't qualify for food stamps because I was a full-time college student and I didn't work enough hours to qualify - which seemed silly because if I was able to work more hours I wouldn't need the food stamps. And that's part of the reason I gained so much weight. I formed some really unhealthy eating habits because of the financial stress I was under and my inability to buy good food. It can be very frustrating trying to stretch $200 over the course of a month.

If food banks and farmers markets are out, have you thought of maybe starting your own garden in your back yard if that's an option. I live in a townhouse in a very urban city where a garden isn't really an option, but my parents have one and they love it. They grow tomatoes, beans, strawberries, potatoes, and my Mom wants to plant an apple tree this year. It gives my parents who are retired something active to do and they are rewarded with healthy food in return. I know that doesn't solve your problem right now, but it's an idea for the future.

With your limited resources I would again stress the importance of lists - I use them for everything from shopping to housework. Maybe try buying your monthly staple foods in bulk so you always have them on hand. If you can't afford fresh or frozen veggies canned veggies are pretty cheap and you can get them now with no salt added. Canned fruit with no sugar added is also a lot cheaper than fresh. All natural peanut butter is more expensive, but it is so much better for you and peanut butter streches for quite awhile if you use it in moderation. Iceberg lettuce, while not ideal for nutrition, is pretty cheap and so are apples and they keep for awhile.

Really, just trying to stay away from processed foods like Hamburger Helper and frozen pizzas will make a big difference.
i live in a condo, there's no place for a garden. we have a porch, but it doesn't get enough light, even the bushes in front of the house looks sickly.

i use lists, but bulk isn't really an option as all 3 adults in my house have different diets (i'm lo-cal, grandma is healthy crap i don't like such as quinoa and asparagus, boyfriend is high-protein) and we only have 1 fridge and a kitchen the size of a lilypad. We have so little room that we found a bookshelf and sawed it shorter and put it under the kitchen table for extra storage, and it's constantly full AND we have food just sitting in bags under he table because we have nowhere else to put it.

i get frozen veggies on sale all the time(only $1 per bag), and i have canned veggies (with no salt added) for when i run out of those, but i rarely do as i buy veggies constantly. my grandmother makes me salads all the time so i don't have to worry about lettuce. i constantly have apples. and i've been avoiding stuff like that (and freezer meals, i used to have 2 a day) for a while now, i don't even buy instant mashed potatoes anymore, even thought they're cheaper, i buy regular potatoes and cook and mash them myself. no pancake mix, do it from scratch.

merilung
04-27-2013, 12:04 PM
Even though we were well below the poverty line for close to year I didn't qualify for food stamps because I was a full-time college student and I didn't work enough hours to qualify - which seemed silly because if I was able to work more hours I wouldn't need the food stamps.

This is what happened to me, too! I wasn't a student, but I was working part time, husband was on unemployment, both of us were looking for better work right when the economy tanked. When I applied for food stamps, I was told we didn't work enough hours to qualify - whaaaaat the....?!

Later, a friend of mine told me they routinely turn folks down the first time, assuming that people who really need food stamps will re-apply. Jerks.

betsy2013
04-27-2013, 12:20 PM
I wonder if this .gif will work...
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/mt/assets/food/obesity-map-GIF-jh.gif

I started to leave a note saying it worked fine but what is it. I see from the labeling from the picture that it's an obesity map.

Yes, there are a lot of items at the store that I don't need. But I'm either very well disciplined or else just lucky in that I make a list and I'm what I refer to as a blitzkrieg shopper; i.e., I don't even look at things that aren't on my list because I just want to get the stuff and get out of there. Of course, that means that I hear about new things from the true shoppers who look at every item, but I swear an elephant could be sitting in the aisle and I wouldn't notice unless my cart ran into it. :D

I swear by a shopping list and never allowing myself to be hungry. My downfall comes at check out if I'm hungry because a candy bar always miraculously finds its way into my cart if I'm hungry.

Alyssa Autopsy
04-27-2013, 02:49 PM
This is what happened to me, too! I wasn't a student, but I was working part time, husband was on unemployment, both of us were looking for better work right when the economy tanked. When I applied for food stamps, I was told we didn't work enough hours to qualify - whaaaaat the....?!

Later, a friend of mine told me they routinely turn folks down the first time, assuming that people who really need food stamps will re-apply. Jerks.

thats weird, because when i told them i had 0 income and 0 assets they gave me food stamps right away

amandie
04-27-2013, 03:29 PM
thats weird, because when i told them i had 0 income and 0 assets they gave me food stamps right away

I think it may be for people who are still working and earning money but I could be wrong. When I first applied, they gave it to me right away since I had 0 income and 0 assets as well but when the time came to re-apply after a year, I was denied at first because of my disability income (which isn't that much after rent and utilities, etc) then I appealed and got $16 dollars a month. :shrug:

This may be too personal to ask so I apologize in advance but after reading the whole thread, I am wondering- why can't your boyfriend get his own food stamps? Surely, that would help out you all a bit more?

I wish you the best of luck.

Daimere
04-28-2013, 02:28 AM
I just thought have you looked at any of kaplod's posts or shoestring meals forum? Kaplod's has had to work with very low budget and successfully have lost weight.

And good luck getting disability. My sister in law has had to re-apply like four times (bipolar, ADHD, mass issues in body, and a ankle that can't bear weight for more than 30 minutes at a time).

Alyssa Autopsy
04-28-2013, 10:58 AM
I think it may be for people who are still working and earning money but I could be wrong. When I first applied, they gave it to me right away since I had 0 income and 0 assets as well but when the time came to re-apply after a year, I was denied at first because of my disability income (which isn't that much after rent and utilities, etc) then I appealed and got $16 dollars a month. :shrug:

This may be too personal to ask so I apologize in advance but after reading the whole thread, I am wondering- why can't your boyfriend get his own food stamps? Surely, that would help out you all a bit more?

I wish you the best of luck.
he just got a job. he's not making much, but as long as he can get the hours he needs he'll be making slightly more than unemployment. and he doesn't want to be on welfare and is embarrassed that i tell people that i am. i think he's going nowhere right now (he's 28, only works out an hour a day, wants to be a fighter and run his own clothing line... it's not happening but idk how to break his heart.)

Alyssa Autopsy
04-28-2013, 11:03 AM
I just thought have you looked at any of kaplod's posts or shoestring meals forum? Kaplod's has had to work with very low budget and successfully have lost weight.

And good luck getting disability. My sister in law has had to re-apply like four times (bipolar, ADHD, mass issues in body, and a ankle that can't bear weight for more than 30 minutes at a time).

bipolar with psychotic tendencies, borderline personality disorder, ptsd, and anxiety. i also have scoliosis and fallen arches and something wrong with my heart but i have no medical coverage so i can't afford to get the exams i need to confirm it. Binder & Binder took my case though, i just have to get some information sorted out and see them again. if they want to take my case, i'm pretty sure i'll get it. it just takes time. but the more time it takes, the more backpay i get. and if i can get enough backpay to get a car, pay the insurance and gas, i'll be able to go to school and drive myself to and see doctors etc.

punkrocksong
05-01-2013, 08:57 AM
Well, in Iowa to deter college students from just getting food stamps to avoid using their "spending" money on food they make it so you have to work 25 hrs a week in order to qualify. If I was only working the 20 hrs a week and my husband was just on unemployment we would have probably qualified. At the time I was taking 20 credit hours and only working about 20 hrs a week.

I was lucky enough to have friends and family help us out during that rough patch. When my husband and I were down to our last pack of ramen and a half a jar of pickle juice, and when I was honestly not sure where my next meal was going to come from, my best friend stopped by with $200 dollars worth of groceries. I think that was probably the first time I cried over food. Even though we were only in that boat for six or seven months, it took me a long time to get over that mentality of not being sure where my next meal would come from.

Unfortunately, once we were a little bit more financially stable, I still tended to eat like it was going to be my last meal ever...and even though it's been years since I wasn't able to afford food on a weekly basis - I'm just now learning how not to eat like it will be my last meal ever.

Alyssa - I'm not sure what the solution to your problem is. I only have to worry about feeding myself as I work 1st shift and my husband works 2nd. We don't have any kids or other relatives living with us. I will say that I finally had to confront my husband this past weekend about how serious I am about losing weight and him wanting me to "cheat" all weekend with him every weekend can't keep happening. I have to start putting myself first, as selfish as that sounds.