100 lb. Club - Camping out and healthy eating?




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Daimere
04-20-2013, 02:51 AM
Hey! Next month is Kinetic and I will be camping out. I really want to eat healthier but I just don't know what would be friendly. Obviously my current diet is not appropriate for it (The simple diet...3 shakes/2 entrees/5 fruits/vegs). I was probably going to switch to WW for that week if I don't before then (I switch it up on a regular basis). What would you pack that would be healthy? I don't want to gain. I want to maintain or lose that weekend.

My ideas:
some veggies like carrots, celery, something that will keep well.
bananas (but those will probably last only so long)
cliff bars
beef jerky
fruit purree in the packets that's marketed towards kids.
fruit jerky
deli meats and wraps
vitamin waters (I get really dehydrated at these events and need to keep my electrolytes up)
overnight oats premade?


I dunno. I'm so lost sometimes at picking out really good camping food that will keep my energy up


shcirerf
04-20-2013, 03:00 AM
Water.

Grilling when camping out is fine.

Veggie kabobs! Grilled fish! Grilled chicken!

You can also grill fruit kabobs. Snag some yogurt and fruit for breakfast. Instant oatmeal. All you need is some hot water. Egg Beaters! Love those. Wal Mart has some great turkey sausage patties that are only 2pp.

Snack on melons of all kinds! Who does not like melons when camping?

Don't make it more complicated than it needs to be!:hug:

Daimere
04-20-2013, 04:15 AM
I don't have a grill. I have a one mini camping stove. Now at another festival,i might have a grill since me and another girl are gonna split hearty food. I hear of some people only living off bars and nuts all these festivals. I know the times i didn't pack rigtt,i got sick. Which is why i keep the beef jerky in my pack for a quick pick up.

I actually asked the creator of the simplr diet. He told me to get hmr meals and just eat them like that. I am like yous crazy! I don't see how one could camp out and follow that system. Which is why i feel like switching back to ww would be best.


ReNew Me
04-20-2013, 08:20 AM
I'm a long time camper and haven't eaten traditionally (read, hot dogs, hamburgers, breads, etc.) for decades. I'm not familiar with the festival you're attending, so I don't know how long you'll be there but I'm assuming you won't have electricity and will be living out of ice chests. I've done that for 8 days at a time and here's my observations:
1. Fresh bananas don't seem to camp well, they bruise fast and rot quickly (maybe it's a temperature thing? Humidity?) Anyway, same is true of fresh berries of all sorts and grapes.
2. Apples however, do travel nicely. Ditto melons of all varieties.
3. Tupperware is your friend, as well as plastic wrap, ziploc bags and aluminum foil.
4. However, never assume tupperware is waterproof in an ice chest situation.
5. Dried fruit and nuts are a quick and easy meal substitute but premeasure portions, they're notoriously high in calories (1/2 cup of just about any nut has over 400 calories. Basically, 1.5 cups of almonds is the average woman's daily caloric requirement and it's easy to eat that fast).
6. Watch the sugar content on things like fruit leather.
7. Watch the fat and salt content on things like deli meats and cheeses.
8. If you get one of those egg carrier things from a camping store, eggs travel just fine and are easy to cook.

What I generally do? Precook food that's a mixture of meat/carb/veggies (think like a pasta primavera, you can make it with pasta or rice and pre cooked food lasts longer in an ice chest). Reheat portions on your camp stove tossing it with some water and maybe a little butter or olive oil or spaghetti sauce. I'll also precook oatmeal (if you use thicker oats or steelcuts they'll keep for a week, you'll sort of be carving it out of the bowl but add a bit of water and low heat, keep stirring and be patient) I add nuts and dried fruit to that when I initially cook it. I'll also bring canned soups and yogurt.

I'm sorry this ran so long. For me the big problem with these events is trying to avoid cooking and for some reason if I don't have hot food for a few days in a row I start getting all sorts of GI problems.

Daimere
04-20-2013, 09:38 AM
I'm sorry this ran so long. For me the big problem with these events is trying to avoid cooking and for some reason if I don't have hot food for a few days in a row I start getting all sorts of GI problems.

No problem at all! This will help a lot. It will be at least 3-4 days. Totally living out of an ice chest.

lunarsongbird
04-20-2013, 10:35 AM
Check out the dirty gourmet-
http://www.dirtygourmet.com/roasted-balsamic-brussel-sprouts

FUN recipes!

bargoo
04-20-2013, 11:31 AM
You can make all the plans you want and have the best intentions but someone nearby is bound to be brewing coffee and frying bacon, nothing smells better in the fresh air. Good luck .

EmmaD
04-20-2013, 12:01 PM
I'm a long time camper and haven't eaten traditionally (read, hot dogs, hamburgers, breads, etc.) for decades. I'm not familiar with the festival you're attending, so I don't know how long you'll be there but I'm assuming you won't have electricity and will be living out of ice chests. I've done that for 8 days at a time and here's my observations:
1. Fresh bananas don't seem to camp well, they bruise fast and rot quickly (maybe it's a temperature thing? Humidity?) Anyway, same is true of fresh berries of all sorts and grapes.
2. Apples however, do travel nicely. Ditto melons of all varieties.
3. Tupperware is your friend, as well as plastic wrap, ziploc bags and aluminum foil.
4. However, never assume tupperware is waterproof in an ice chest situation.
5. Dried fruit and nuts are a quick and easy meal substitute but premeasure portions, they're notoriously high in calories (1/2 cup of just about any nut has over 400 calories. Basically, 1.5 cups of almonds is the average woman's daily caloric requirement and it's easy to eat that fast).
6. Watch the sugar content on things like fruit leather.
7. Watch the fat and salt content on things like deli meats and cheeses.
8. If you get one of those egg carrier things from a camping store, eggs travel just fine and are easy to cook.

What I generally do? Precook food that's a mixture of meat/carb/veggies (think like a pasta primavera, you can make it with pasta or rice and pre cooked food lasts longer in an ice chest). Reheat portions on your camp stove tossing it with some water and maybe a little butter or olive oil or spaghetti sauce. I'll also precook oatmeal (if you use thicker oats or steelcuts they'll keep for a week, you'll sort of be carving it out of the bowl but add a bit of water and low heat, keep stirring and be patient) I add nuts and dried fruit to that when I initially cook it. I'll also bring canned soups and yogurt.

I'm sorry this ran so long. For me the big problem with these events is trying to avoid cooking and for some reason if I don't have hot food for a few days in a row I start getting all sorts of GI problems.

I'm so glad I saw this! I camp a lot and use many of these tricks - and it's great to see some new ones!

A few other things I do:
Use the blue ice blocks. When frozen, they keep things cold for more than a day and the great thing I have found is that when you add ice later, they blocks cool down again and the ice stays around much longer.
I often bring whole wheat pita bread or whole wheat tortillas/wraps. They travel very well and don't get smooshed. Keep cool to avoid them going moldy, but unless it is really hot out a few days should be fine.
Pre-cut veggies (broccoli and cauliflower florets, celery, bell peppers) are good for a few days. Baby carrots even longer. If you open a fresh tub of hummus, that would be good for a few days as well, but you have to keep that cold. I have seen individual packs of hummus! That would be good as well so you don't have to worry about an open container.
I often make a cabbage salad that lasts for days and often gets better with time - mine is just shredded cabbage (with or without carrots), olive oil, vinegar, salt & pepper. It's good in wraps.
Tuna in pouches is great. No draining. There is also the wonderful Wild Planet tuna that also doesn't require draining and comes in a pull back can.
I bring a lot of condiment packets from fast-food restaurants so I don't have to worry about storage issues - mustard, mayo etc.
Some dehydrated soups are great and just require heating up water - I love black bean and split pea
Boiled eggs travel well as long as you keep them cold.
If you are OK with ready-to-drink protein drinks, I have sometimes brought some of these (like the EAS AdvantEDGE Carb Control, available at Target - the cafe caramel is good in the morning with coffee). They keep at room temperature and you can pop one or two in the cooler as needed.Good for you for thinking ahead. Have fun!!!:carrot:

Daimere
04-21-2013, 08:58 AM
I am loving these suggestions so far!

CyndiM
04-21-2013, 09:20 AM
We love egg muffins like the ones at Kalyn's Kitchen. I usually make them with sausage (chicken or veggie for us), an easy vegetable like spinach, and cheese. They are good cold (whole or in a wrap, or heated on a camp stove). Hearty salads with beans & protein, and avocado gazpacho are also regular items in our cooler. I prefer some kid of homemade bar with seeds and dried fruits to the premade bars. If you don't have nut allergies any gluten free baked goods with almond meal add protein in an easy package. We do a lot of camping and this will be my 6ht summer following a plan. It's very doable.

Daimere
04-24-2013, 12:11 PM
Precook food that's a mixture of meat/carb/veggies
What are some good recipes for this? When I was batch/freezer storing some meals didn't turn out right. The only thing I trust to freeze is chili!