PCOS/Insulin Resistance Support - Do you own a blood sugar monitor?




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veggiedawg
03-26-2013, 02:20 PM
Just curious how many PCOS'ers have them and use them often?

Did your doctor suggest it?

Did you get it for free? (I see sometimes ads for free monitors if you buy certain test strips)

Do you feel it was worth getting? (helped you understand your bodies' response to insulin)

Thanks!


immaculate
03-26-2013, 02:27 PM
I'm diabetic so I use one. I'm not 100% sure about this, but I think most insurance companies will only cover blood testing supplies if you have diabetes, not pre-diabetes or insulin-resistant PCOS. If you decide you want to get one and your insurance doesn't cover it, it seems like the cheapest out-of-pocket strips and meter are Relion Prime from Walmart (http://www.walmart.com/search/search-ng.do?search_query=relion+prime&ic=16_0&Find=Find&indexId=13da5baf3cbc&cdnHost=search-cdn.walmart.com&searchdropdowndiv=com.wm.module.305715.constraint&search_constraint=0). If your insurance does cover it, they will probably have preferred brands. Accu-chek and OneTouch seem to be preferred for most companies. Also, it's easy to find cheap or free meters but the cost of the strips will get you.

sophiew
03-26-2013, 02:40 PM
I have a meter, but the meters are cheap - it's the strips and lancets that are very expensive. I got my meter when I had gestational diabetes and I still have some leftover strips and lancets so I check it occasionally. I was thinking of asking my PCP for an RX for the strips and lancets, but I don't know if it will be covered or not.

I do think it is worth testing to see how your body reacts to certain foods and volume of carbs.


Jaqs
03-26-2013, 03:21 PM
I bought one and use it randomly. I do not have health insurance right now so when I dont feel so good I check my levels. I bought it off amazon with some test strips. It came with some lances, I am not out of them yet but those suckers are pricey.

Rana
03-26-2013, 10:40 PM
Just curious how many PCOS'ers have them and use them often?

Did your doctor suggest it?

Did you get it for free? (I see sometimes ads for free monitors if you buy certain test strips)

Do you feel it was worth getting? (helped you understand your bodies' response to insulin)

Thanks!

I have one!

Yes, my doctor suggested it.

My insurance covered it, including the test strips with a copay.

I think it was worth it, but only for a short while.

My endo also gave this piece of advice -- your diet can be perfect, but your blood sugar levels still high. They will go down as you lose weight. Sadly, there is a correlation! But again, motivation to continue losing weight.

astrophe
03-27-2013, 12:30 AM
Just curious how many PCOS'ers have them and use them often?Did your doctor suggest it?

I was given one when pregnant because of gestational diabetes.

Did you get it for free? (I see sometimes ads for free monitors if you buy certain test strips)

Yep. But my subsequent ones I just picked up.

Do you feel it was worth getting? (helped you understand your bodies' response to insulin)

I keep it around for random checks. Sometimes I feel weird and I cannot pinpoint why so I check blood sugar to rule that out. I like being able to do that.

A.

synger
03-27-2013, 01:47 PM
I got one the week after I was dx with Pre-Diabetes (I'd been dx with PCOS and IR about 15 years earlier than that).

I bought my first one because I read Blood Sugar 101, and wanted to see what my meals were doing to my blood sugar.

Then, my doc sent me to diabetes education (2 -day seminar), and prescribed a meter and strips. We learned to use the meter in the class, along with a bunch about the disease, medications, food, and lifestyle issues.

I definitely think it was worth getting. NOTHING but seeing those numbers climb after a carby meal has been able to hit home the reality of my insulin resistance. NOTHING has helped me stick with a low-moderate carb plan like testing after a carby meal "Just to see if I'm still pre-D..." And of course, I am.

NOTHING else has helped me stand up to those who suggest "Oh, you should eat something healthy like oatmeal for breakfast!". It's not my opinion. It's not my doctor's opinion. It's not some study or article online. It's a cold, hard meter number that shows that oatmeal for breakfast is NOT GOOD FOR MY BLOOD SUGAR! It may be fine for you. It may be great for Sue down the street who has diabetes 2 and is on insulin. It is NOT GOOD FOR ME. And I can prove it, because I use my meter.

I tested a lot at the beginning, when I was developing a repertoire of "safe" meals and foods that didn't spike my blood sugar. Basically I did breakfasts first (because I'm happy with only a handful of meal options that I eat over and over). Then I ate those safe breakfasts while I experimented with lunches. Once I knew what I could eat for lunch, I began working on dinners, which are much harder because there is SO much variety (especially when you eat out a lot!).

Now, I only check my fasting once in a while, and post-meal when I've eaten out or eaten more carbs than I expected. (Like last night's Seder meal... who knew matzoh has THAT much carb??!)

Anyway, I highly recommend that anyone with PCOS or IR get and use a blood sugar monitor. See what your reaction is to the foods you eat. It may not be a huge thing (remember, I didn't begin using one until I was pre-D), but it may be eye-opening.

And if nothing else, a test now and then can help you see if you're creeping up into pre-D territory. It's a way of being pro-active in your health.

Michelle125
03-28-2013, 02:08 PM
I have one, and only used it a few times when I realized I was getting consistent readings no matter what I ate. I even tested it with a horrible sugar bomb of a meal. I never went above 110 then went back down to 87 a few hours later. I think with my PCOS it has more to do with a problem of insulin secretion rather than blood sugar. My fasting glucose tests are always below 95... but my insulin levels are high.

I am not a doctor but I have a theory: there might be two types of PCOS.
PCOS I: problems with high blood sugar
PCOS II: problems with high insulin secretion

Just my thoughts. There is absolutely no scientific basis to that lol.

astrophe
03-31-2013, 09:46 PM
I think you might mean hyperinsulinemia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperinsulinemia)

A.