Ideal Protein Diet - Buying/Measuring Non-IP foods - advice?




rubygirl05
03-16-2013, 08:35 PM
The IP food is pretty $$, but I thought at least my non-IP food costs would be minimal. However, I actually feel like I'm spending more money on food than I did before...8 oz of meat and 4c. of produce a day adds up. (I live alone so my costs are just for myself and I ate meat maybe 3-4/week previously.)

I know I can look for sales but I'm trying to figure out how to make my non-IP food go farther.

Any tips or suggestions on meat/produce choices?


Also, my doctor wants me to weigh my food AFTER cooking it (I asked 4 different times to confirm). I know this is the opposite of what's said here on 3FC. I don't know which to follow, and if I measure pre-cooked, should I just not mention that to my Dr?


Thanks for any advice.


Desafinado
03-16-2013, 09:05 PM
You could eat less meat. I think 8 oz a day is the max but it's not mandatory. I weigh before cooking because my meat is usually cooked into something.

DRegan
03-16-2013, 09:22 PM
The IP food is pretty $$, but I thought at least my non-IP food costs would be minimal. However, I actually feel like I'm spending more money on food than I did before...8 oz of meat and 4c. of produce a day adds up. (I live alone so my costs are just for myself and I ate meat maybe 3-4/week previously.)

I know I can look for sales but I'm trying to figure out how to make my non-IP food go farther.

Any tips or suggestions on meat/produce choices?


Also, my doctor wants me to weigh my food AFTER cooking it (I asked 4 different times to confirm). I know this is the opposite of what's said here on 3FC. I don't know which to follow, and if I measure pre-cooked, should I just not mention that to my Dr?


Thanks for any advice.

I look for sales on chicken, lean pork, ground turkey. buy bigger amounts and
freeze what i'm not using. Saves $ for sure. Also weigh before I cook.
Also steam fresh frozen vegies are good to keep, lots of times theyre 1$ bag, two servings. Great when fresh are too expensive or I run out.
Hope that helps alittle.
good luck!:wave:


evepet
03-16-2013, 09:55 PM
I find making a beef stew for a couple of dinners (package of stewing beef, plus 000 bouillion, spices, celery, peppers, rutabaga); a dinner of tuna patties (a can of tuna in water, mixed with 2 egg whites and some diced/sauted celery & peppers, formed into patties and then sauteed); and one or two dinners/week of a big veggie omelette (4 eggs + 2 egg whites + veggies) makes my $ stretch further. Ground beef or turkey generally isn't too expensive either, and it's great for meatballs, or stuffed peppers, etc. Where I live a package of frozen tilapia fillets generally provides 4-5 fillets for around $6.00, which is reasonable and also a nice change of pace. I do review my local grocery fliers each week to see what's on special for the week and do my meal planning from there before heading off for my weekly shopping. By planning things out in advance I find I overall buy less food, avoid impulse purchases, and avoid spoilage of veggies, etc. due to overstocking. I also buy chicken breasts which still have the bone & skin still attached... less expensive than the skinless/deboned chicken breasts, and I find they're juicier after they're roasted... once roasted, the meat practically falls off the bone and it's easy to remove the skin before eating.

Another poster here gave me the tip to shred a head of cauliflower at a time in the food processor, then measure it into individual servings sizes and freeze them. I find this handy, and it prevents spoilage. I like using frozen veggies too, stock up when I find them on sale as they keep frozen indefinitely.

Calisto
03-16-2013, 11:40 PM
Even though the lean meat and veggies cost more I have been saving more from not eating out as much (but I have 4 kids too)

I try and base my meals that week around what is on sale. If beef is on sale we have Taco salads, meatloaf (IP style) hamburgers etc...

I agree go with the frozen or canned veggies if you have to when the fresh stuff isn't on sale. Asparagus we have only when it's on sale, which it has been the last 2 weeks. Cauliflower is usually the cheapest veggie for us, it lasts so long if you rice it up ahead of time! You can add it to soups, chicken (as in chicken and rice) or stuffed peppers!

IdealProteinNewbie
03-17-2013, 09:10 AM
I stock up on chicken, lean ground beef, pork, etc when on sale. Then I weigh 8 oz raw and put in a zip-loc bag in the freezer. I also have veggie omelets twice per week...easy, delicious and inexpensive.

I use 95% fresh vegetables, but will use frozen cauliflower, broccoli and okra from time to time.

Yes, it's expensive but think about all the foood you won't be purchaing anymore (cheese, bread, crackers, nuts, etc.) and all the health benefits you'll be gaining!

WorldTraveleronIP
03-17-2013, 10:31 AM
It's just my husband and I but he is not on IP, however, he eats the dinners I make, only he adds rice or pasta or potatoes. The trick is to buy ahead, wash and portion ahead into bags. Each Saturday, I do this for the week ahead with veggies. The meat I probably buy once every 2-3 months (unless I get a fresh portion of bison from Whole Foods) from Costco.

Do you have a Costco near you? You can buy organic or regular chicken breast fresh, take home the giant pack, clean and measure out 6-8oz portions, bag them and freeze them.

Also, at Costco, they have in the frozen aisle: shrimp (you can take 9 out for a 4oz serving), defrost it in a bowl of cool water and make it for dinner within 10 minutes of taking it out of the freezer.

Additionally, I buy the package of frozen turkey burgers from Costco (nothing added) and those are individuals that can be removed one at a time (5 oz portions).

There are also packs of albacore tuna in water that can be made into tuna salad (WF mayo, sliced onion, celery and pickle).

Veggies I buy like IP Newbie (95% fresh, 5% frozen and I watch for sales and stock up on what I can eat).

I find the IP diet way cheaper than how I used to eat.

I hope these ideas help.

benice
03-17-2013, 12:47 PM
Don't forget that eggs count as your protein (4 wholes + 2 whites). I have scrambles for dinner all the time. You can get organic, free-range whole eggs and egg whites at Costco relatively inexpensively.

I also buy frozen, pre-portioned talapia, salmon and cod at Costco. They are less than $2 per serving and are quite good. I thaw all day and then cook with salt and pepper and garnish with lemon.

Hope this helps!

rubygirl05
03-17-2013, 02:30 PM
These are some great suggestions!! Thanks so much.

I had forgotten that eggs count as protein, so I definitely will start adding those to the menu. I love the cauliflower rice idea, and I see it can also be frozen. And I hadn't even thought about tuna in the can. I also realized that the protocol doesn't require chicken to be only boneless,skinless chicken breasts. I can buy boneless, skinless thighs at a cheaper price, as well as the bone-in chicken idea (and pulling the meat off of it).

I only recently returned to the workforce about 1.5 yrs ago, so I actually had eliminated a lot of the non-necessities and junk food items. I told my sister that I haven't eaten so well in a long time, the protocol doesn't let you skimp on meals!

TNmom
03-17-2013, 02:49 PM
I buy the boneless skinless frozen chicken in the big bulk bags. Its easy to pop them in the oven and when I do I make enough for 2-3 days. Shrimp is a quick prep too when I catch it on sale I stock up. I LOVE The steamer bags. Its easy plus I dont run the risk of letting something spoil. Other than that heads of lettuce are pretty cheap. I get decaf coffee to add to my RTD choc shakes, those are good for a busy mornings. A container of the egg whites lasts me a while, you can use it in case you really need an 'extra' something that day or for recipes. But the frozen stuff has really helped me this past week. The first 2 weeks I overestimated how much I was going to need a some stuff went to waste :(.