PCOS/Insulin Resistance Support - Insulin Resistance diet, anyone?




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SuperCecilia
03-11-2013, 11:14 AM
Hi all,

I have insulin resistance (I take 1000 mg metformin with breakfast, and 1000 mg metformin with dinner) and am trying to follow the Insulin Resistance diet. Basically, it consists of moderating carbs and always balancing carbs with protein. Not to eat more than 30 g carbs at a meal and have at least 14 g protein - and half those numbers for snacks (15 g carbs and 7 g protein). Eating every 3 hours or so to keep blood sugar levels stable (wanting to avoid highs and lows, but keep it steady). And trying to keep fat in check, so choosing lean proteins (fat free dairy products, chicken breast, etc) and using healthy tub margarine instead of butter, that kind of thing.

Anyone else out there trying to follow this or a similar plan? If so, want to swap ideas for meals/snacks and how to hit those numbers for carbs and protein? Thanks and hope there are others out there!


Sheridan
03-11-2013, 01:01 PM
Hi,

I never heard of this diet. What do you eat for meals with only 30 g carbs? I was amazed at the ADA recipes which have many meals with over 60 g of carbs.

Is there a book on this plan?

How are you doing with this?
Sheridan

Novus
03-11-2013, 02:47 PM
I use the two basic principles of the IR Diet for meal planning - linking carbs & protein and no more than 30 grams of carbs at a time. This helps control my appetite and keep my blood sugar stable. I don't do any of the rest of it, though.

Margarine, by the way, is a very bad substance that's created by a very scary process. In fact, it is only one molecule away from being classified as plastic.

http://peppermintteathyme.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/margarine.jpg?w=300&h=229

Butter, on the other hand, is just churned cream (and you actually can make it yourself!).


SuperCecilia
03-11-2013, 03:38 PM
Sheridan - yes, there is a book called "The Insulin Resistance Diet" Just go to amazon and look it up (I don't think I can include a link). I shared it with my acupunturist/nurse and she thought that it was sound. It explains the science of insulin resistance, and how when people try to cut fat and calories they end up eating way too many carbs which just makes things worse (which definitely resonates with my experience).

I would say that I am doing okay, but it's only been a week. 30 g of carbs at a meal is actually not an unreasonable low amount (I know folks who try to do no carbs at all, which would definitely not be sustainable for me). You can have two pieces of whole grain toast with scrambled eggs, or a serving of oatmeal with almond and milk for breakfast. I just had a huge salad with grilled chicken for lunch - actually no carbs there at all. Or 2/3 cup of rice or pasta served with a lean protein (tofu, tempeh, fish, chicken, etc) and veggies. Two corn tortillas with beans, guacamole, salsa, and a side salad. According to this plan you don't count the carbs in beans/lentils or in milk, which helps.

The thing that is tricky is that there isn't much room in there for sweets - cookies, cakes, chocolate, all tend to be high in sugar (and in many cases, refined flour) and sky-high in carbs. I've been having hot cocoa with a tablespoon or two of sugar and cocoa powder to curb my sweet tooth.

Novus - I know, I was just describing what the authors of the book say, but I personally believe that "real" fats - including butter, avocado animal fat from free-range grass fed animals, and unprocessed oils, - is the way to go. I think that's my one point of disagreement with the authors.

Novus
03-11-2013, 05:54 PM
Novus - I know, I was just describing what the authors of the book say, but I personally believe that "real" fats - including butter, avocado animal fat from free-range grass fed animals, and unprocessed oils, - is the way to go. I think that's my one point of disagreement with the authors.

Ok. Sorry about the margarine freak-out. :D

According to this plan you don't count the carbs in beans/lentils or in milk, which helps. The thing that is tricky is that there isn't much room in there for sweets - cookies, cakes, chocolate, all tend to be high in sugar (and in many cases, refined flour) and sky-high in carbs.

If you don't have to count beans as carbs, and if you really want a sweet treat, maybe look up some of the recipes for bean-based desserts. I've seen such things for brownies and cookies, like THIS RECIPE (http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipe/flourless-brownies) for Flourless Brownies (made with black beans).

sophiew
03-11-2013, 10:24 PM
I am following the Insulin Resistance diet and I think it's great! It's the first eating plan I have found that I feel like I could stay on for life.

SuperCecilia
03-12-2013, 01:12 PM
SophieW - thanks for your reply. I'm glad to hear that the IR diet is working for you. I do feel like since I am new to it, it is taking some time and energy, but once I get into the swing of things and get used to some standard snacks and meals, it will be sustainable. It is so important to have a plan that you feel like you can follow for life!

Would you mind sharing with me a typical eating day for you? Or some of your go-to staples for meals and snacks?

Here is some of what I have been doing:

breakfast
1 1/2 slices of toast (I used to do 2 but it's too many carbs) on WW bread with natural peanut butter and a glass of milk.
2 scrambled eggs with salsa and 1 1/2 slices of toast
Steel cut oats (30 g worth) with sliced almonds, a few frozen blueberries and some additional protein like chia seed or milk.

snacks
KIND bars - I've found one that has 7 g protein and 15 g carb, perfect!
kale chips - made with garden kale in the food dehydrator with nutritional yeast and sea salt. SO good.
apple and a few raw almonds
low fat cottage cheese with whole grain crackers like triscuits (I have to watch my portions because I can so overdo triscuits)
hummus with whole grain crackers and baby carrots

lunch/dinner
whole wheat tortilla with canned refried beans and some veg (salad, steamed veggies, whatever I've got)
homemade soups with lentils/beans and lots of veggies and a whole grain like quinoa or barley or wild rice
4 oz white fish (I've got some mahi mahi thawing for lunch now) with side of veggies and mashed potatoes/cauliflower mix. (I just discovered how awesome mashed cauliflower can be as a stand-in for mashed potatoes)

I think the hardest thing has to get my protein intake high enough. I am thinking about experimenting with a protein powder, to add to milk or to add to my oatmeal. And having hot cocoa with organic skim milk and just a bit of sugar has been giving me my chocolate sweet fix, which makes it feel sustainable.

So far I am only down a few pounds but I've only really been at this for about two weeks or so, so I would say it's off to a good start.

SuperCecilia
03-12-2013, 01:14 PM
ooh, Novus, thanks for the reminder about black bean brownies! I have made them in the past but haven't for a while and this would be a great option for the IR diet. :)

Novus
03-12-2013, 04:23 PM
ooh, Novus, thanks for the reminder about black bean brownies! I have made them in the past but haven't for a while and this would be a great option for the IR diet. :)

You're welcome. :)

Are you vegetarian? I noticed the only meat on your food plan is fish. Maybe check over on the vegetarian part of the board for some protein ideas?

synger
03-12-2013, 04:30 PM
I LOVE the Insulin Resistance Diet. Even now, years later and following a different (even more low-carb) plan, the IR Diet is my fall-back for flexible eating. No matter where I eat out, or what party I go to, I can find something that fits within the framework of linking, balancing, and limiting carbs that is the IR Diet.

So I usually say I'm "cutting back starches and sugars, and following the IR Diet plan"

It was my intro to lowering carbs, and it was the first diet I used after my pre-Diabetes diagnosis, and I could SEE from using my blood glucose meter that eating this way kept my BG steady. WHat an eye-opener!

I borrowed the book from my library.

SuperCecilia
03-12-2013, 05:55 PM
Novus - no, I'm not a vegetarian (in fact a beef and veggie soup is simmering for dinner...), but also don't like to eat huge amounts of meat. Mostly because I only like to eat meat that is hormone-free, organic, free-range, etc and it just gets expensive. Good idea on checking out the vegetarian site.

SuperCecilia
03-12-2013, 05:56 PM
Synger - glad to hear the IR diet has been helpful for you. Congrats on your weight loss! I'm sure that actually tracking your blood glucose and seeing the impact of your diet change was a real motivator.

sophiew
03-12-2013, 09:39 PM
Breakfast: Either 1 piece whole wheat toast or a small oatmeal for my carbs, plus turkey sausage and eggs for my protein.
Snack 1: Either string cheese or peanut butter for protein, plus a small apple or other fruit for my carbs.
Lunch: Bean/lentil soup, or salmon/chicken with salad or cooked low-carb veggies (e.g., broccoli)
Snack 2: Plain low-fat Greek yogurt and berries or high-protein low-carb bar
Dinner: 30 g of sweet potato, squash, or whole grain (like bulgur or brown rice), protein (tofu, chicken, fish), and lots of low-carb veggies
Snack 3: Cocoa made with 1 c skim milk, 2 t sugar, 2 t unsweetened cocoa powder

SuperCecilia
03-13-2013, 07:46 PM
Hi Sophie - thanks for sharing. Seems like a good plan and you've given me some good ideas. I was tickled to see your "snack 3" with cocoa with skim milk, sugar, and cocoa powder. I drink that pretty much every evening as well - something sweet and chocolatey without being too high in sugar or carbs. Keep up the great work!

sophiew
03-13-2013, 09:28 PM
For the first month or so I found it incredibly difficult to figure out how to stay within the rules, but I think I finally "get it" and now I love it!

Dhcrawf2
09-01-2013, 07:18 PM
I am in the middle of reading the book right now and I'm pretty overwhelmed so far! I feel like it's going to be hard to figure out all of the carbs and protein of everything I eat. Also, do ya'll have a food scale that you measure your meat portions with? A lot of the measurements are "1 ounce" of meat. How do you figure that out without weighing it?