Diabetes Support - Hypoglycemic




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jakeness
02-21-2013, 01:52 PM
I don't have diabetes.. but I get hypoglycemic VERY quickly. It's very hard to diet. I have started WW PointsPlus so I can snack on a little fuit all day long.

I can't make it through a 3 hour glucose test. My blood sugar is so low after they call me to make sure I'm ok the next day!

I have a big problem dieting because sometimes I don't know if my blood sugar is low or if it's just natural hunger or something else.

Also, I've heard people with my condition develope diabetes later in life.. I don't know if this is true or if there is something I can do to prevent this.

I'm 5'4" .. 188 lbs... I want to be 135 lbs. I was 192 when I started dieting.

Anyone else in this boat? Ideas? Suggestions?

Thanks!!
-- Jess


berryblondeboys
02-21-2013, 01:57 PM
Well, if you are hypo glycemic, why are you eating fruit????? You need protein and you need fat to keep your blood sugar stable. Fruit is sugar, so it will spike and come crashing down.

You can recondition your body (I have). I used to by hypoglycemic. Well, I cut out the simple carbs (well all grain based carbs and sweet fruits like bananas, mangos, peaches mostly) and will eat some blueberries, raspberries, etc. Give it food that is satiating and that will hold you and not spike your blood sugar.

Read up - you don't have to go totally low carb like Atkins, but find that balance for you. For me, I just can never eat a food without significant protein/fat or else I'll crash. MANY people do.

And yes, you can do WW with their points and still not have crashing blood sugars.

jakeness
02-21-2013, 02:06 PM
I wasn't told to avoid fruit... I usually have a 2-3 servings a day to tide me over until my next meal..... But I shouldn't do that?


bethFromDayton
02-21-2013, 02:14 PM
I wasn't told to avoid fruit... I usually have a 2-3 servings a day to tide me over until my next meal..... But I shouldn't do that?

I would try protein based snacks, or at least things that include protein. Ham and cheese rollup, cheese and crackers if you can tolerate the crackers without crashing or cheese and summer sausage. Nuts. Even veggies are better than just fruit.

You might want to consider going totally carb free for a week or so, see how you do (first 3 days are the hardest), and then add carbs slowly back in.

There are also those who select their foods based on glycemic index--that's another option for you to explore.

You've already discovered that what you're doing now isn't working well for you--might as well experiment. berryblondeboys knows a lot about carb restrictions and reactions.

berryblondeboys
02-21-2013, 02:20 PM
I wasn't told to avoid fruit... I usually have a 2-3 servings a day to tide me over until my next meal..... But I shouldn't do that?

Fruit is great, but it's sugar. Sugar is bad for people who have problems processing sugar - which your body does if you are hypoglycemic.

I eat an apple every day for lunch (well most days). Fruits high in fiber also break down slower, so release sugars slower. BUT, I also eat it with 2-3 tablespoons of peanut butter and a generous dousing of cinnamon. It makes it taste sweet to me and there are some studies that say cinnamon helps with blood sugar issues too, so why not?

I know you are trying to watch calories/points, but maybe your lunches or breakfasts are too high in carbs too which makes you need snacks. Load those up with protein (and fat) too and you might find you don't even need a snack and if you do, grab a cheese stick or two, or a LOW CARB protein bar (those things can be FULLLLLL of sugar and also very low protein - most are junk food). Or, make a why protein powder drink. I like chocolate muscle milk. There are ways to get 'sweet' but not bad for your blood sugar sweet.

Fortunate
02-21-2013, 02:24 PM
I am hyperglycemic (but not so severe that i crash after 3 hours) I can have fruit but not too much (try have more veg per day than fruit) and no sugar what so ever (not very good at keeping to that)
I try to stay away from:
White carbs
low fat dairy - too much sugar
sweets and cake obviously
and any fizzy drinks, even flavoured water.
Most cereals have sugar in them
dried fruit also has alot of sugar and so do fruit juices.


Stick to low GI food and have muslei in the morning to keep you going.
I am also a vegatarian so I was put onto iron supplements and calcium and magnesium, if you feel like you are crashing have honey in warm water (to see if its hunger or blood sugar) that usually helps me.
Lossing weight is difficult for me because of it but you will have a bigger variety because you eat meat and you get used to looking at sugar contents of EVERYTHING, its now second nature to me.

Never heard it could cause diabeties, but was told you can wean sugar back into your diet - slowly.
I find making the fruit into a smoothie fills me up more than the fruit does, maybe this will help you cut down ur portions of fruit?

This is what i figured out on my own, i dont know if it will help for you - seeing as you have a more severe case than i do - good luck!
There are also sugar supplements (xitol or something along those lines) maybe try that?

berryblondeboys
02-21-2013, 02:29 PM
I would nix the muesli... if she drops quickly, it's still a lot of grains and dried fruits.

jakeness
02-21-2013, 03:31 PM
Thank you all so much!! I will try to add more protein/fat to my meals-- nix the fruit and stick to veggies..

Would those wheat thin toasted crackers be ok? Just a few with some cheese or almond butter ?

I'm lazy though. I find it near impossible to fix breakfast.. it's a struggle for me to get that mini-bagel with laughing cow light swiss spread on it.. LOL

Flower Child
02-21-2013, 07:01 PM
I also have issues with hypoglycemia. You are right that it sometimes leads to diabetes. My doctor said considering my weight and fluctuating insulin levels along with the hypoglycemia, it's considered pre-diabetes. I know I need to eat more protein, but when my blood sugar crashes carbs help to make me feel better quickly. I just need to stop the cycle since I know my carb intake is causing my low blood sugar.

fatmad
02-21-2013, 08:06 PM
YOu are doing right if you can lose the weight and keep it off. Having your doctor test you periodically is important since you are at risk. It may be a long time before an A1C test will be high though, if you have both highs and lows, so consider just fasting glucose tests.
I definitely agree with having low glycemic fruits with other foods, and protein and fats for snack to prevent the low blood sugar.

Wannabehealthy
02-22-2013, 09:32 AM
A co-worker was tested and diagnosed with hypoglycemia a few years ago. She was put on a diet of no sugar, low carb. After she got it under control, she was told she could have sugar only if eaten with other food, such as a small dessert after dinner, but never a meal such as a donut and coffee for breakfast. She has been fine ever since following this.

Iheartsushi418
02-23-2013, 05:24 PM
I am also hypoglycemic, as is a cousin of mine. Our family has a pre-disposition to diabetes and we thought we had dodged a bullet, but my doctor told me we were actually at higher risk as hypoglycemia shows our bodys don't process sugar correctly, just on the other end of the spectrum.

For me, I find snacking to be vital! What works best for me is to get in some protein...like grapes and cheese, or laughing cow soft cheese with celery and carrots. The soft cheese comes in several flavors so you can mix it up. If you want to eat your fruit, maybe try a small fruit salad with slivered almonds. Hummus is another great snack.

Like you, I struggle with breakfast. I rarely wake up hungry, but I always wake up thirsty, so I make a protein shake...Natureade total soy is my favorite, fyi. I like adding lots of ice to it :). I will also throw in some frozen fruit and spinach...you won't taste the spinach and the greens are great for my iron deficiency as well. Chocolate with strawberries and spinach are my favorite, followed closely by vanilla and peaches and bananas, or chocolate banana.

missunshine
02-23-2013, 05:52 PM
after reading all this i guess i'm hypoglycemic . i was suspecting it for a long time, after i eat fruit i get hungry right away and also after eating sugary things i get even hungrier than before. once i measured my sugar level after my breakfast but it was 3,9 but i think that is the normal level.

Iheartsushi418
02-23-2013, 08:34 PM
Misssunshine, 39 is not good. Normal blood sugar is around 80...different for everyone, but still up there. You may want to check with your doctor. : )

Wannabehealthy
02-24-2013, 10:08 AM
Iheartsushi, I think maybe Misssunshine was saying "3.9" which is equal to around 70.

Ruthxxx
02-24-2013, 10:28 AM
True. Remember that the rest of the world measured FBGL differently from the USA. Multiply our readings by 18 if you want it in US.

Iheartsushi418
02-24-2013, 11:15 AM
Iheartsushi, I think maybe Misssunshine was saying "3.9" which is equal to around 70.


:o ooopppps....sorry, I was on my tablet and didn't see the comma.

HEYDA
02-24-2013, 11:37 AM
I am not diabetic but I also get hipoglicemic from time to time... Is very scary can I munch on a small chocolate?

Novus
02-24-2013, 12:05 PM
You absolutely MUST eat breakfast. You've been fasting since dinner (10 or 12 hours) so when you wake up your blood sugar is already low. If you don't eat within an hour of waking up, your blood sugar will quickly start to drop to uncomfortable and dangerous levels. You don't feel hungry or notice the low blood sugar because your brain is releasing beta-endorphins, a chemical that protects you from feeling pain. A couple hours after waking up (and skipping breakfast) the euphoric affects of the beta-endorphins wear off, your blood sugar is crazy low, and you crash and feel like utter crap (and are probably running to the nearest quick sugar-fix you can find). And you've set yourself up for a roller coaster ride of all-day-long high/low sugar levels. Your breakfast should be mostly protein with just a tiny bit of carbs. (I usually do eggs, meat and 1/2 cup fruit). An all-carb or high-carb breakfast will send your blood sugar soaring, which will cause your body to release a surge of insulin to bring it back down, but because of the excess insulin your blood sugar will fall too low (and again, you'll have that sugar level roller coaster).

One of the first things I read that really helped me understand how to deal with hypoglycemia and sugar sensitivity was Potatoes Not Prozac by Kathleen DesMaisons. I don't endorse everything she teaches but the book has some valuable information that helped me to understand what my brain and my body were doing (including the breakfast info I shared above). One of the things she suggests is to keep a Food Journal in which you log everything you eat and how you feel before/after eating. You need to learn how your body is responding to certain foods and how you're reacting to your blood sugar levels.

Another book that helped me was the Insulin Resistance Diet. The book teaches a lot about how your body processes insulin and blood sugar and the effects they have on weight gain. The two primary principles I apply to my life are: (1) Always link carbs with protein. You should never eat carbs without protein but you can eat only protein. The IR formula is 15 grams protein to 30 grams carbs. (2) Never eat more than 30 grams of carbs within a two hour period. According to the IR Diet, your body is unable to process more than 30 grams of carbs at a time so the rest is converted to fat.

You might also want to research the Glycemic Index which ranks food based on the impact they have on your blood sugar. I find this resource especially helpful for fruits. I've found that I'm basically okay with any fruit with a rating of 40 or less.

And exercise is enormously beneficial for balancing sugar/insulin levels!

jakeness
02-25-2013, 04:05 PM
You absolutely MUST eat breakfast. You've been fasting since dinner (10 or 12 hours) so when you wake up your blood sugar is already low. If you don't eat within an hour of waking up, your blood sugar will quickly start to drop to uncomfortable and dangerous levels. You don't feel hungry or notice the low blood sugar because your brain is releasing beta-endorphins, a chemical that protects you from feeling pain. A couple hours after waking up (and skipping breakfast) the euphoric affects of the beta-endorphins wear off, your blood sugar is crazy low, and you crash and feel like utter crap (and are probably running to the nearest quick sugar-fix you can find). And you've set yourself up for a roller coaster ride of all-day-long high/low sugar levels. Your breakfast should be mostly protein with just a tiny bit of carbs. (I usually do eggs, meat and 1/2 cup fruit). An all-carb or high-carb breakfast will send your blood sugar soaring, which will cause your body to release a surge of insulin to bring it back down, but because of the excess insulin your blood sugar will fall too low (and again, you'll have that sugar level roller coaster).

One of the first things I read that really helped me understand how to deal with hypoglycemia and sugar sensitivity was Potatoes Not Prozac by Kathleen DesMaisons. I don't endorse everything she teaches but the book has some valuable information that helped me to understand what my brain and my body were doing (including the breakfast info I shared above). One of the things she suggests is to keep a Food Journal in which you log everything you eat and how you feel before/after eating. You need to learn how your body is responding to certain foods and how you're reacting to your blood sugar levels.

Another book that helped me was the Insulin Resistance Diet. The book teaches a lot about how your body processes insulin and blood sugar and the effects they have on weight gain. The two primary principles I apply to my life are: (1) Always link carbs with protein. You should never eat carbs without protein but you can eat only protein. The IR formula is 15 grams protein to 30 grams carbs. (2) Never eat more than 30 grams of carbs within a two hour period. According to the IR Diet, your body is unable to process more than 30 grams of carbs at a time so the rest is converted to fat.

You might also want to research the Glycemic Index which ranks food based on the impact they have on your blood sugar. I find this resource especially helpful for fruits. I've found that I'm basically okay with any fruit with a rating of 40 or less.

And exercise is enormously beneficial for balancing sugar/insulin levels!



Thanks!! This is a big help!