100 lb. Club - Eating right on a budget..."why is bad food cheaper"




Thinforme
02-09-2013, 12:47 PM
Hi, so I'm just starting out but I swear it seems that "junk" food is so much cheaper maybe that explains why we have such an obesity problem in america. I could use some ideas for healthy low calorie "preferred"ideas for meals and snacks. I love salads but they can become boring. I'd really like some for seafood as its very lacking in my diet. Thank you


elvislover324
02-09-2013, 12:52 PM
I used to think the same way, then I had to make some really serious changes to get healthy. Let me tell you, there is no way I am spending our hard earned money on some Cheetos or takeout pizza anymore! Of course there may be times that either of those are on the menu but not as often as they used to be.

I get so excited seeing how much I can buy now in produce, frozen foods, grains...I do shop sales so if asparagus or squash is the sale item, guess what our menu has a lot of?

We used to eat so much frozen chicken and potatoes (think: chicken fingers and french fries). Now we buy a good size pack of fresh chicken and a bag of potatoes and have so many varieties of dishes to make (and it's never chicken fingers and french fries anymore!).

In reality now that we are in a new groove, our food bill has not increased with healthy eating so we are very happy. And our waistlines decreased too!

Thinforme
02-09-2013, 01:04 PM
Thats awesome, congrats on your success :) I try hard to stay away from to much already cooked food "I dont like feeding my boys the preserved stuff" I'm not much of a cook though so maybe I should start trying to make some of the recipes but it doesn't always work without a guideline : p I can be kind of hopeless without my microwave lol


lunarsongbird
02-09-2013, 01:11 PM
Biggest Loser just did a segment about this a couple episodes ago. Here is some great advice: http://www.nbc.com/the-biggest-loser/social/cheryls-blog/2013/01/shopping-on-a-budget/

I definitely only shop on the outer perimeter of the market and buy seasonal. I'm actually saving a ton of money, but what I'm not saving is time- it takes more time for me to cook, at this point, mostly because I'm just kinda learning to cook.

So a quick recap- Saving money. Not saving time. But saving my life.
Yup- the math is pretty good, really.

ETA: I LOVE this book-
http://www.amazon.com/Mark-Bittmans-Kitchen-Express-Inspired/dp/1416575677
Mark Bittman's Kitchen Express: 404 Inspired Seasonal Dishes You Can Make in 20 Minutes or Less

I'm trying to learn how to cook like a "minimalist" to save money and time- and to appreciate simple ingredients:
http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/25/the-minimalist-chooses-25-of-his-favorites/?ref=dining

HelloNurse
02-09-2013, 01:13 PM
That's only true if you're allergic to preparing your own food. I can now feed my fiance and myself both very well on about $60/week, that only purchases a couple meals if you eat out a lot. And if you think about how much junk you have to eat to feel satisfied, are you really spending any less? I challenge all the fast-food, convenience food junkies of the world to do some math and figure out their cost per meal vs. mine. Because I can turn a 3 pound chuck roast (about 11 dollars) with about 4 bucks worth of carrots, onions and peppers into pot roast in the crock pot. Then the roast gets shredded into sandwiches the next night, then the meat gets turned into soup, then the last of the soup gets folded into either a pot pie or shepherd's pie. For a total of about 25 bucks once you add the bread and stuff for the other nights, I just fed two working adults dinner for half the week. If you have kids in your household, the savings just get multiplied.

And have you seen the price on decent chocolate lately!? The cheap stuff has been cut with so much soy lecithin I can't even eat it. The texture sucks, and soy is a big migraine trigger for me. I can snack on strawberries, or pears with good Norwegian blue cheese for less than a candy bar these days.

lunarsongbird
02-09-2013, 01:15 PM
Oh- Also- this is an interesting article:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/opinion/sunday/is-junk-food-really-cheaper.html?pagewanted=all

http://intentblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/McDonalds_prices.jpeg

HelloNurse
02-09-2013, 01:17 PM
Sorry Lunar, you posted while I was typing my rant. You basically made the same point I did.

Keep up with the cooking! I make sure to always have some stuff for sandwiches and a quick semi-homemade soup in the house for those nights when you're not into cooking, or you're too hungry to wait. I've got a 10-minute French onion soup down pat. Once you get in the groove of it, you'll wonder why life wasn't always that way! It has taken me a year of knuckling down and making myself eat at home to get the hang of it.

lunarsongbird
02-09-2013, 01:25 PM
I want to grow up and be HelloNurse. :)
I think tonight I'm going to make a quick chicken picatta- I need to get the chicken out of the freezer.

Oh- And holy easy- is it silly that I didn't know how easy it was to roast a whole chicken? I do it weekly now!
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/perfect-roast-chicken-recipe/index.html

merilung
02-09-2013, 01:31 PM
Like others, I buy seasonally. What's on sale in the produce department is usually the highest quality stuff there, because it's what's in season and what they have an abundance of.

The things I buy a lot of, I look for a cheaper way to make myself. I started making my own yoghurt, and this week I'll start making my own larabar type energy bar for my husband's lunches.

We buy a whole chicken every week or two and it feeds us for several meals - I roast it with root veggies one night, make chicken broth out of the carcass and vegetable scraps, and add the leftover chicken meat, onions, and carrots for an awesome, filling chicken soup! We buy local pastured usually, which is more expensive, but the idea works with ANY whole chicken at any price point! Making my own homemade soups and bone broths was really intimidating to me at first, but I'll never go back to buying soup after discovering how easy it is.

I try to shop at the farmer's market as much as possible. There's always some REALLY good deals and farmer's market seconds are cheap as dirt.

For seafood, we usually have some frozen salmon on hand (we get ours from trader joe's, but I think target and costco also have frozen salmon at a decent price). I'll poach 3 fillet's at a time and use the leftover one as salad topping. We also keep tinned fish (salmon, sardines, anchovies, sometimes mackerel) on hand for quick and easy snacks. My husband is allergic to shellfish, so unfortunately that type of seafood is out for us.

Thinforme
02-09-2013, 01:34 PM
Thanks for the advice :) I'm still really learning what is "healthy" which is why I joined here it seems like for every article saying something is bad for you there is another saying its good. So I'm interested to see what works for people. Like I thought your supposed to avoid starchy food like potatoes? As you can see I'm pretty confused lol

lunarsongbird
02-09-2013, 01:43 PM
Like I thought your supposed to avoid starchy food like potatoes? As you can see I'm pretty confused lol

Depends on what you are going for. People carb counting, especially with the intention of getting into ketosis, avoid things like potatoes. It's amazing how many carbs they packed into those little things. ;)

You can see what some of the ladies are doing on this thread:
http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/100-lb-club/274098-no-judgement-zone-what-you-doing-weight-loss.html

And why I have made the choices I have here: http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/100-lb-club/274108-okay-so-you-can-judge-me.html

Thinforme
02-09-2013, 01:46 PM
Thanks Lunar :)

merilung
02-09-2013, 01:50 PM
Thinforme - there's lots of different plans for healthy eating, and you're going to have to figure out what works for you. The general points that seem to be common in most plans are that whole foods are preferred over processed foods, and sugar/refined carb consumption should be eliminated or minimized.

For example, my Mom eats a fairly balanced vegetarian diet and includes plenty of potatoes, legumes, nuts, fruits, and veggies with some whole grains and minimal egg/dairy consumption. My husband and I eat a low-carb, high-fat paleo diet that includes plenty of animal products (including animal fats), veggies, nuts, zero grains, zero legumes, and minimal potato/starch, fruit, and dairy consumption. We all eschew sugar and (for the most part) packaged food, and I would consider all of us to be on a healthy diet even though our ways of eating vastly differ from one another. My mom gets sick and exhausted on low-carb. Moderate carb vegetarianism throws my hormones out of whack. Don't be afraid to experiment and figure out what works best for you!

TripSwitch
02-09-2013, 01:59 PM
So many great posts... Thanks lunar... for that post with the pic's... that McDonald's stuff just does not look appealing to me anymore... in fact I think I would rather take my chances and eat the chicken in the pic below RAW, rather than that Micky D's stuff... lol... Sorry to go off topic with that...

But back to the OP... you mentioned you would like to include more seafood in your diet... I love fresh fish and seafood, so we have it in my house several times a week... What I do for quick meals when it comes to fish is I always keep really good high quality frozen salmon and other fish and seafood on hand... It usually can be defrosted much quicker than meat or chicken, so if I forget to plan ahead it's not a problem... I keep a few different really good store bought quick marinades around to use if I don't have time or feel like making my own... and all I do is sauté or bake whatever fish I've got on hand and serve it with a quick salad and some vegetables... Takes about 30 to 45 minutes to put it all together... so not too bad as far as I'm concerned...

ilidawn
02-09-2013, 02:04 PM
I way cheaper to be fat. Flipping through the ads, the vast majority of what's on sale is unhealthy. Thing is though, there are ways to deal with that. I wait for veggie/fruit sales and stock up. If they start going bad before I get around to eating them I make a vegetable soup or cook up dishes using them and stock up the freezer. Seafood sales come about once a month or so around where I live (like salmon filets $1 each) and I do the stocking up thing with them too.

Thinforme
02-09-2013, 02:07 PM
I'm not big on fish but I believe food "likes" is learned behavior so I'm giving it a chance in the new me. What brand frozen do you purchase? I worry that all the good for you benefits get sacrificed so I'm trying to educate my self. A knowledged mind is a strong mind.

April Snow
02-09-2013, 03:16 PM
The homemade chicken dinner is higher in fat and calories than McDonalds??? That's just bizarre.

But in any case, like others have posted, I find that overall, I don't spend more eating a high protein, low carb diet. I think if you look at all the extra meat and seafood and imagine adding that to your current food budget, then yeah, it seems expensive. But for me, when I was eating junk, I was eating a LOT of it. So those bags of chips or cookies may not have been that expensive, but it wasn't like it lasted for a couple of weeks at a time. Eliminating pretty much all processed foods leaves lots of room in my food budget for the things I eat.

As for specific things to have, I try to cook multiple servings of everything, and when possible I freeze portions. So I will broil or grill several pieces of chicken at once, and then have that for several meals. I don't personally roast whole chickens because I'm not a fan of white meat and I would rather cook the individual pieces that I like. I roast up a big batch of veggies and have that over several days. I cook soup just about every week and take it for lunch.

chubbiegurl
02-09-2013, 03:28 PM
I bought a deep freezer, had them price match a cheaper place that was too far! When ever boneless breast is on sale I buy upwards of 40 lbs. I can feed us all on about 3 lbs that's usually under 6 bucks for chicken, not including the quinoa or veggies or beans we usually eat but that is usually just an added expense of 3 dollars or so. I just have to make sure I stay on top of the sales. I also buy frozen veggies in abundance when they have a sale. When we go out to eat for 5 it's usually no less than 40 bucks and we r left hungry a couple hours later. But I get what u mean when a box of Mac and cheese is 50 cents or a frozen pizza is a couple dollars, u just have to really search for those sales.

lunarsongbird
02-09-2013, 03:45 PM
I want a deep freeze sooooo badly!! I really really want to buy a quarter of a cow. Do you recommend a particular freezer?

I also know a lot of people that save a ton of money at vitacost- Free shipping on anything order over $49! http://www.vitacost.com/ They also have a referral program- http://www.stacymakescents.com/use-vitacost-for-better-deals

ETA: I need to start eating out of my freezer, because I want to try some of these value packs:
http://www.andersonmeat.com/index_files/Page888.htm

So I guess the moral of the story here is...Try to find a local farmer/rancher. Buying in bulk will really reduce the cost of the meat. You can also find a local CSA program (community sponsored agriculture) for veggies. Also- News Alert- this is seriously cool-:thanks2: Check out craigslist- people will sell eggs from their happy backyard chickens for a great deal.
(yes- I know those are turkeys, but sometimes you can buy those on craigslist too! LOL)

ETA AGAIN: (I get so excited about this topic).
You can find the most amazing things on your Farm/Garden section of Craiglist: http://greenville.craigslist.org/gra/
You will find yourself building a sustainable little community. Being healthy can literally change your entire life! It's AWESOME!!! ::geeking out::

Oh...my...goodness. $2.95 a pound for happy South Carolina cows?!! JEALOUS! http://greenville.craigslist.org/grd/3533944294.html

Josiee
02-09-2013, 03:55 PM
I'm in Canada and I would say in the last 5 or so years junk food including fast food and processed food is way more expensive then good non processed food. In the McDonald's example above I would say around here for any fast food with tax it is close to $10 a person. A bag of chips used to be at most $2 and now the lower end chips regular price are $1.50 to $2 and the standard brand chips are about $3 to $4. I prefer cooking at home even when going to a good restaurant both because of the cost of that restaurant meal and knowing what actual ingredients are in the food I make.

lunarsongbird
02-09-2013, 03:59 PM
Also- Check out your local chapter of the Weston Price Foundation. They will often buy things in bulk to divide among the members for an exceptional cost!
http://www.westonaprice.org/local-chapters/find-local-chapter

It might seem a little overwhelming at first, but there is a whole new healthy world out there for you to explore! It's exciting times!!

synger
02-09-2013, 04:04 PM
I spend more money on food now... but it's because I'm buying healthy meat and veg for me, and still buy chicken nuggets and chips for the rest of the family.

I'm hoping that I can slowly move them toward healthier fare. If I were just buying for myself, I would definitely spend less. I buy whatever meat is on sale, and get most of my veg frozen. I buy eggs and cheese and butter full price (it's seldom on sale). The rest of my pantry stuff is usually on sale as well (peanut butter, tuna, soups, etc.)

berryblondeboys
02-09-2013, 04:06 PM
In my home we spend a lot of money on food. I will not lie. We feel what we put in our bodies is worth it and we have the means to buy good food.

HOWEVER, with that said, I cut back where I can. I make my own yogurt (doing it right now). I make organic yogurt that costs less than half what it costs to buy it at the grocery store.

I make our own breads. The loaf my son likes is $3.99 a loaf for WHITE bread! My husband's is about $4.50 a loaf. For me to be able to make it at home? The white bread is about 30 cents a loaf. The WW is about 50 cents.

I buy seasonally and sale fruits and veggies. Some veggies I buy frozen that taste OK frozen (collard greens and the like). I buy generic and bulk where I can and we don't buy ANYTHING processed except for the protein bars and soon that will be eliminated too - I'm going to start making my own. I even bake and slice our own deli meat (tastes better and it's cheaper).

Currently, I only work part-time so I can do it. When I was working more full-time hours (two part-time jobs) I was doing it mostly on the weekends. Saves me tons of money and tastes better too.

Now, where they get ya is the pre-cut stuff. You pay for convenience.

I don't buy fresh fruit except for apples and an occasional orange or grapefruit. I buy frozen, bulk, generic berries other fruits and add them to my yogurt to make a smoothie (yogurt, partially thawed frozen fruit and 1/2 a scoop of chocolate or vanilla protein powder/whey powder). That way I don't worry about it going bad.

Thinforme
02-09-2013, 04:48 PM
Lunar, your kind of my hero for the craigslist advice I just moved from Orlando to South Carolina so I had no idea about buying that way :)

Synger, I'm in that boat I'm trying to convince the adults to eat healthier but it's hard to pry the fat from a southern family lol I also have a nine year old autistic son who eats a very specific diet and my five year old is autistic also but not as picky but very small I'm afraid to limit his fat to much.

Thank you everyone :)

lunarsongbird
02-09-2013, 04:56 PM
Thinforme- Are you using GAPS? I'm using GAPS for my crohn's disease, but the diet was made for children with autism. Also- don't need to be afraid of the fat so much as the sugar. ;) http://www.mommypotamus.com/why-gaps-healing-your-inner-junkie/

Processed sugar scares me. Check out Nourishing Traditions- It's a great read: http://www.amazon.com/Nourishing-Traditions-Challenges-Politically-Dictocrats/dp/0967089735

Thinforme
02-09-2013, 05:13 PM
With my oldest it's because he will only consume seven things in this world. Luckily he drinks only milk and loves certain fruits but his main food is fruit loops :/ he won't eat any meat or veggies so he takes vitamins. My youngest is my veggie eater he wont touch anything really sweet "favorite food is green beans" but he is one of those kids you just can't put weight on at five he just got up to forty pounds and he is very tall for his age.

Thinforme
02-09-2013, 05:21 PM
Wow that GAPS article is enlighting. I need to discuss that with his doctor he consumes large amounts of milk.

lunarsongbird
02-10-2013, 10:26 AM
Oh oh- Here is another link I found you:
http://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2013/02/pennywise-platter-thursday-27.html

Real food bloggers from all over the blogosphere making "pennywise" recipes. Wonderful!

MrsO2010
02-10-2013, 10:46 AM
I paid $14 for a butternut squash the other day, pineapples run at about $7, potatoes are $11 for a 5lb bag and bell peppers are about $2.50 each (and they are tiny) :-( I nearly cried when my husband and I first arrived here!

Misti in Seattle
02-10-2013, 10:54 AM
Bad food is cheaper because over 80% of the commercially processed foods are loaded with genetically modified corn... which is subsidized by the federal government (google and check it out; I did and was appalled). It is also full of stuff such as wood ashes, etc. It is far cheaper to produce "food" if you make it out of stuff that is not real food.

I do spend a lot more on food than I used to, but it is worth it to be eating nutritious, wholesome, food that is not contaminated with pesticides and other garbage.

HelloNurse
02-10-2013, 10:55 AM
Ouchies! I hope you're able to find somewhere to purchase produce at a reasonable price. It stinks to overpay for anything, moreso when you don't have much choice in the matter.

MrsO2010
02-10-2013, 07:58 PM
My husband is serving in the USAF and those prices are on the base at the commissary :-( it makes me so sad that they think its ok to charge us these prices know there is little to no choice off base!

Thinforme
02-10-2013, 08:04 PM
Mrs.O210, That is really awful.

HelloNurse
02-10-2013, 08:16 PM
Ooh. Commissary is usually cheaper than off post. Get thee to the nearest street market! Do they even have those in Okinawa? Not all cities around the world do, but if you can find one it's a lovely place to get regional fruits and veggies that can be fun to cook with. I don't know though; one of my college friends was from Japan and she told me that young people in the cities tend to eat a ton of street food and convenience meals, even more than most American twenty-somethings.

SarahFairhope
02-10-2013, 08:37 PM
Bad food is cheaper because over 80% of the commercially processed foods are loaded with genetically modified corn... which is subsidized by the federal government (google and check it out; I did and was appalled). It is also full of stuff such as wood ashes, etc. It is far cheaper to produce "food" if you make it out of stuff that is not real food.

I do spend a lot more on food than I used to, but it is worth it to be eating nutritious, wholesome, food that is not contaminated with pesticides and other garbage.

YEP!

SarahFairhope
02-10-2013, 08:41 PM
I paid $14 for a butternut squash the other day, pineapples run at about $7, potatoes are $11 for a 5lb bag and bell peppers are about $2.50 each (and they are tiny) :-( I nearly cried when my husband and I first arrived here!

The reason your prices are so inflated is because it cost soo much money to ship things to Japan from American buyers. I lived on overseas bases most of my life and one of the biggest tricks I've found is to be sure to eat like the locals. Ie, when I lived in the UK, I didnt buy the "American" Lays brand potato chips from the commissary for $6/bag when I could go the Tesco and buy UK Lays crisps for a quid! ;)

Japan is just so much more pronounced because of the shipping charges. Learn to eat like the Japanese and youll have a great healthy diet AND save a ton. There should be a MMWR office there on your base that can help with with setting up local shopping trips, sometimes even with guides. :D

shcirerf
02-11-2013, 02:08 AM
I want a deep freeze sooooo badly!! I really really want to buy a quarter of a cow. Do you recommend a particular freezer?

I also know a lot of people that save a ton of money at vitacost- Free shipping on anything order over $49! http://www.vitacost.com/ They also have a referral program- http://www.stacymakescents.com/use-vitacost-for-better-deals

ETA: I need to start eating out of my freezer, because I want to try some of these value packs:
http://www.andersonmeat.com/index_files/Page888.htm

So I guess the moral of the story here is...Try to find a local farmer/rancher. Buying in bulk will really reduce the cost of the meat. You can also find a local CSA program (community sponsored agriculture) for veggies. Also- News Alert- this is seriously cool-:thanks2: Check out craigslist- people will sell eggs from their happy backyard chickens for a great deal.
(yes- I know those are turkeys, but sometimes you can buy those on craigslist too! LOL)

ETA AGAIN: (I get so excited about this topic).
You can find the most amazing things on your Farm/Garden section of Craiglist: http://greenville.craigslist.org/gra/
You will find yourself building a sustainable little community. Being healthy can literally change your entire life! It's AWESOME!!! ::geeking out::

Oh...my...goodness. $2.95 a pound for happy South Carolina cows?!! JEALOUS! http://greenville.craigslist.org/grd/3533944294.html


I have an upright and a chest freezer, I like the upright better as food tends to get buried/lost in the chest freezer. But it can depend on how much room you have and where you want to put it.

Beyond that, I have to say, I'm lucky enough to live on 100 acres and raise a huge garden! So I can raise and can/freeze/dehydrate most of my veggies. I have enough canned, pickles, salsa, green and yellow beans and carrots to last all winter. :DWorking on fruit. That's a tough one here, as our season isn't fruit tree friendly. But strawberries are ok, and have a long term plan for raspberries, service berries, and I discovered, there are zone friendly kiwis, and paw paws, and tons of other fruits.

I get farm fresh eggs from my boss for free!:carrot::carrot: He does charge everyone else $2/dozen.

If your living situation is not garden friendly, you can still raise a few veggies in pots, tomatoes and cucumbers are easy. Granted you won't get a lot, but it's fun to go out and pick your own when you can. Look into a community garden if it's available, if not, look into starting one. Some herbs are easy to grow in a window sill.

As far as meat goes, we get our beef fresh from an uncle that raises them and buy half a beef a year. The hub gets a deer permit, and we process our own. But, beyond that, talk to the folks where ever you grocery shop, ask them when they put meat on sale. For instance, my local Wal Mart puts meat about to out date on sale early on Saturday morning. So if you want to score on skinless chicken breast you need to get your bum out of bed and get to Wally World early. One thing I found about those chicken breasts, after weighing them, they are usually a double portion, so I split them in half length wise and get double out of the package.:carrot: Then I freeze the portions individually in ziploc bags.

Most stores do the same thing with fruit and veggies. Where I live more so with veggies, but if you ask, they will tell you when the best time is to shop on deals.

Pork is another good one to look for on sale. My local Safeway puts lean pork loin on sale a couple of times a year. This is basically a boneless pork chop. Similar to a beef prime rib. I can pick up a 6-8 pound chunk of loin for $20! Then I take it home and slice it up into proper portions and bag it individually and freeze!

Dry edible beans are another great option. Versatile, cheap, but you have to keep in mind they take time to cook. Gotta love the crock pot!

Eating healthy does not cost more, and it really does not take anymore time. What it does take, is the time, initially, to take the time to do the research and learn to plan and prep!

Thinforme
02-11-2013, 08:25 AM
I love my cockpot even more than my microwave :)

amandie
02-11-2013, 05:02 PM
I love my cockpot even more than my microwave :)

*giggles* cockpot. I love my crockpot too! I think it's much easier than using the microwave.

Thinforme
02-11-2013, 05:28 PM
Me and the microwave have an understanding about the cockpot "it's not jealous" lol

BreathingSpace
02-11-2013, 05:43 PM
The reason your prices are so inflated is because it cost soo much money to ship things to Japan from American buyers. I lived on overseas bases most of my life and one of the biggest tricks I've found is to be sure to eat like the locals. Ie, when I lived in the UK, I didnt buy the "American" Lays brand potato chips from the commissary for $6/bag when I could go the Tesco and buy UK Lays crisps for a quid! ;)

Japan is just so much more pronounced because of the shipping charges. Learn to eat like the Japanese and youll have a great healthy diet AND save a ton. There should be a MMWR office there on your base that can help with with setting up local shopping trips, sometimes even with guides. :D

yeah, I lived in Saudi and I think I bought broccoli once in the entire year I was there because it was so insanely expensive! I did end up eating more like the locals as it was way cheaper. Unfortunately I gained weight because local food was soooooo good (think shawarma and rice and cheap indian food, etc.).

My brother lives in Okinawa and he was just complaining about the cost of tomatoes the other day. I think he bought 2 of them and it cost him nearly $4-5!

Pink Hurricane
02-12-2013, 10:37 AM
Oh- Also- this is an interesting article:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/opinion/sunday/is-junk-food-really-cheaper.html?pagewanted=all

http://intentblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/McDonalds_prices.jpeg

The above is the reason why I don't belive in the 'it's cheaper to eat bad food' logic because technically, it's really just easier to eat the bad stuff. Now that I have figured that out, I found out that I have a deep passion for cooking and coming up with healthy recipes for my husband and I to enjoy. It's a lot of fun, and we spend less on groceries now than we ever have, and we have more food! It's all about perspective, you can get a lot of great, healthy food on a budget. I also highly recommend couponing and checking out who is having the best sales on produce too!

lunarsongbird
02-12-2013, 11:56 AM
I wish there were more coupons for stuff like... a dozen eggs, raw naked chicken breast, beef, avocados. It almost always seems like packaged stuff. :: sigh ::

Thinforme
02-12-2013, 12:34 PM
I agree Lunar

Pink Hurricane
02-13-2013, 12:51 PM
Yes that is one problem with coupons, a good bit of it is packaged. However a couple of weeks ago I found coupons for eggs and frozen veggies, yogurt, frozen fruit, and cheese. But that's exactly why I try to keep an eye on sales on produce! Also in the summer, the local market downtown usually has fantastic deals compared to stores. I already told my husband we are going to by produce in bulk this summer so I can freeze, can, and store them for the rest of the year which will help cut costs too!