100 lb. Club - Perception of calories




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elvislover324
01-29-2013, 01:19 PM
Today at Panera, I drank a black coffee, read 3FC on my tablet and people-watched (and listened!).

A man with his wife/girlfriend came to their table with lunch. He says to her, "The cashier talked me into the cinnamon scone for dessert, looks good.". And it really did!

So I am just there minding my own business but can't help hear him say after eating his lunch and moving to the scone, "I hope this is worth the extra 250 calories."

So now my interest is peaked! What are these scones made of to make them relatively healthy? I look at Paneras website, their cinnamon scone is 620 calories and 29 grams of fat!

I'm not sure what made him think it was so low but he ate every last morsel.

Made me think though, before I started watching calories this time around, I had no clue either! The internet has totally changed things having info at our literal fingertips.

Without Paneras website, I would never have known the scone was 620 calories! And no way could it have been worth it....


April Snow
01-29-2013, 01:34 PM
Could it have been a mini scone instead of a full sized one? They don't have a mini cinnamon scone listed on the online menu but an individual store might make them and that seems like it would be about 250.

It's interesting that someone would be that conscious of the extra calories but then be so completely off if this was the full sized version! And sexist of me, but even more interesting that it would be a man paying attention to calorie counts (even if he was wrong! lol!)

SarahFairhope
01-29-2013, 01:50 PM
Wow, that really made me think!

These were some of my go-to favorite foods-
Breakfast: Bagel with cream cheese and ham and a glass of chocolate milk.
Lunch: Crackers and cheese with tuna
Dinner: Burger and fries
Treat: Buttered popcorn and a cookie

Calorie count: 4861 <---- Whhhhhhaat?

Well... no freaking wonder.

Yeah, that scone is no where near worth 680. Ive had several... I know. ;)


elvislover324
01-29-2013, 01:59 PM
Could it have been a mini scone instead of a full sized one? They don't have a mini cinnamon scone listed on the online menu but an individual store might make them and that seems like it would be about 250.

It's interesting that someone would be that conscious of the extra calories but then be so completely off if this was the full sized version! And sexist of me, but even more interesting that it would be a man paying attention to calorie counts (even if he was wrong! lol!)

It looked normal sized to me but I haven't eaten one in so long maybe I have no clue!

I was impressed too he talked about calories but now that I am on my mission, my husband has come way more conscious of what he eats calorie-wise. I'm so proud!

And if it was in fact a mini scone for 250, still not worth it to me! I want a big one with low calories lol! A girl can dream right???

I should mind my own business when I'm out instead of drooling over others plates of food!

elvislover324
01-29-2013, 02:02 PM
Wow, that really made me think!

These were some of my go-to favorite foods-
Breakfast: Bagel with cream cheese and ham and a glass of chocolate milk.
Lunch: Crackers and cheese with tuna
Dinner: Burger and fries
Treat: Buttered popcorn and a cookie

Calorie count: 4861 <---- Whhhhhhaat?

Well... no freaking wonder.

Yeah, that scone is no where near worth 680. Ive had several... I know. ;)


That reminds me of my old diet 7 days a week...add in a few drinks with friends 1-2 nights a week and calories were higher for me. I guess I don't wonder anymore how I got so big. And I never ever looked up a calorie, just ate what I felt like. Ugh. Never again...

Elladorine
01-29-2013, 03:45 PM
I'm not sure what made him think it was so low but he ate every last morsel.
Maybe he confused the calories with the price (http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6209/6073077429_36c392ab3f_z.jpg)? :dizzy:

berryblondeboys
01-29-2013, 03:58 PM
I people watch and listen too. I went to Chipotles once with my mentee. I loved that they had the calorie count on everything so I didn't have to grab my phone while in line to figure it out. By choosing wisely, I was able to have a good low calorie, low carb meal that tasted great.

My mentee (16) got some hugely caloric meal, but she was dancing competitively and could use the calories.

While we were eating, we were near the line of people waiting to order their food. I overheard a couple standing in line. It was a middle aged couple out with their teenaged son. I see the mom scanning the menu and she said, "I think I'm going to get X. It's not so bad with calories." Dad said (and he was not thin). Whe the he$$ cares about the calories. Just get what you want. She asked him, "So what are you getting?" And the father and son said some enormously high calorie meal. Mom tried to say something but it was falling on deaf ears.

I found that so interesting as the information was right there in front of them - LISTED, not hidden and the dad (and son and my mentee) didn't care about it and ignored it. Even before I was on a weight loss effort, seeing the caloric count DEFINITELY would have influenced me to eat something lighter calorie. I'm shocked that it's not universal.

mnemosyne
01-29-2013, 04:00 PM
Ya, my local Panera is REALLY good about posting the calorie counts on their menu board. I avoid the treat section entirely. Maybe he confused price w/calories or split it with his companion?

With that said: even now my perception of the calorie counts in foods - especially food I am eating out - can be way off so these days I ALWAYS check the nutrition info.

Just today I went to lunch and had nearly talked myself into getting a salad in lieu of my planned sandwich (because I assumed that if I went light on the dressing it would be lower calories and wanted to add a bag of baked chips to my lunch). Well, according to their nutritional chart at the store, the both salads on offer had 2x as many calories as the sandwich. So I had my sandwich and was happy.

But how many people look that stuff up? I never did.

elvislover324
01-29-2013, 04:01 PM
Lol elladorine!

Panera is the only place in my town to go and hang out, have wifi, etc. so a lot of people pass through there.

One day, a lady has to sign her credit card receipt. She barks at the cashier that she never had to sign before, why does she have to now? (People can be so rude...) The cashier explains that if it's over $25, a signature is required.

So then, I see her with her lunch tray for her and her friend. I didn't look close but it didn't seem like a whole lot of food. But it was over $25 worth apparently!

Between the calories and the prices in this place, I am so glad I can't eat there anymore. (My diet is so strict right now, I eat nothing outside of my home.)

The last time I did eat at Panera, it was a chicken sandwich that was about 800 calories (gasp!). I never knew until months later when I looked it up after becoming calorie conscious. The thought is that a chicken sandwich is healthy but add fancy bread, cheese and bacon and it skyrockets in calories!

April Snow
01-29-2013, 04:12 PM
Even before I was on a weight loss effort, seeing the caloric count DEFINITELY would have influenced me to eat something lighter calorie. I'm shocked that it's not universal.

If I'm not actively thinking about my weight, I don't pay attention. And that's even with dieting on and off for 3 decades now, and having a reasonable guesstimate on ballpark calorie counts most of the time. But if I am not thinking about my weight, then even knowing something is very high in calories won't stop me from eating what I want.

eliza422
01-29-2013, 04:55 PM
I eat at Panera every other week - I work from home, and on the day I have my house cleaned I work from Panera.

They have a great nutrition website...and I factor in a pastry so I can enjoy one when I'm there!

They are all pretty high in calories - even the cookies are over 300, so the guy is delusional if he thinks the scone is only 250...or someone lied to him.

To me - the pastries are *worth* the calories - as long as I plan for them!

Avezy44
01-29-2013, 05:12 PM
Wow, that really made me think!

These were some of my go-to favorite foods-
Breakfast: Bagel with cream cheese and ham and a glass of chocolate milk.
Lunch: Crackers and cheese with tuna
Dinner: Burger and fries
Treat: Buttered popcorn and a cookie

Calorie count: 4861 <---- Whhhhhhaat?

Well... no freaking wonder.

Yeah, that scone is no where near worth 680. Ive had several... I know. ;)

You have me so curious about my calorie count on what I used to eat.. I have no doubt it probably exceeds yours by a landslide (especially on thurs-sat when McD's in my town is open 24 hours). I feel so much better when I eat healthy and honestly, a lot fuller too. I agree with everyone else on this one though, 680 is more than I eat in one meal these days so NO WAY would a scone be worth it.

Mozzy
01-29-2013, 05:19 PM
Wow... I never would have guessed the calories of a pastry before I started calorie counting. That pastry is practically half of my daily caloric intake. But back in the day I would have had one happily :-)

lunarsongbird
01-29-2013, 05:19 PM
Maybe he confused the calories with the price (http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6209/6073077429_36c392ab3f_z.jpg)? :dizzy:

This might be a very good guess!

This scone looks like a much better "deal"- http://www.skinnytaste.com/2012/10/delightful-apple-spiced-scones-with.html
Have you all used skinnytaste at all?

I used to be calorie unconscious. Now it's shocking. I'm also carb conscious, which is just as unnerving. I'm like, "GOODNESS SAKES! How do so many carbohydrates fit into a potato?!" LOL.

mnemosyne
01-29-2013, 06:29 PM
This scone looks like a much better "deal"- http://www.skinnytaste.com/2012/10/delightful-apple-spiced-scones-with.html
Have you all used skinnytaste at all?

That looks really tasty. And since I prefer scones without icing, I could do it for fewer calories.

Also: I can always get a reasonable lunch or dinner at Panera. I get a you pick two with 1/2 sandwich and some non-creamy soup, usually garden vegetable with pesto, + a package of their kettle-cooked potato chips, the total meal comes in at less than 550 calories. That's great for a vegetarian meal that satisfied me while eating out. AND I get to eat a small portion of real chips in that total. :)

If their salads were more veggies and less STUFF I might go for salad, but I am always satisfied by that meal. Tasty!

While I love their breads, I find their pastries are too sweet for my tastes. I was craving pain au chocolate once and tried their version and it was waaaay too sweet. Wish it tasted like the real thing (though perhaps I should be glad that it does NOT.)

synger
01-29-2013, 07:07 PM
I used to be calorie unconscious. Now it's shocking. I'm also carb conscious, which is just as unnerving. I'm like, "GOODNESS SAKES! How do so many carbohydrates fit into a potato?!" LOL.

The potato must be bigger on the inside...

Vex
01-29-2013, 08:29 PM
No kidding. I was at applebee's last month and decided to have something different than something I knew the calories of. I had some sort of turkey chipotle wrap. I checked it out later on their website.

Turkey and a wrap. Guesses?

1000 calories. No wonder America is so large.

bethFromDayton
01-29-2013, 08:45 PM
We were at Applebee's tonight. I ordered from the 550 menu and got a salad instead of broccoli -- I hate brocls.

I thought "I have some calories left for today--maybe I'll have a small dessert." I looked them up on MyFitnessPal--the Brownie Bite was 370 calories as were the dessert shooters. I didn't order dessert.

sontaikle
01-29-2013, 08:49 PM
I love Panera. So many yummy, light things. Just like any place you need to watch it though!

Reminds me of the time my fiance and I ordered dessert at Miller's Ale House. We shared a brownie sundae and I figured I would partake because I had about 500 calories left for the day. Usually I look up stuff before I eat, but for some reason I didn't!

I ate about a third of it and then looked it up later because I was curious. The whole dessert was 2700 cals!! Oops! :lol:

lunarsongbird
01-29-2013, 08:50 PM
The potato must be bigger on the inside...

Teehee. :D


Turkey and a wrap. Guesses?
1000 calories. No wonder America is so large.

Oooh.....my....goodness. This must be another case of "bigger on the inside." SERIOUSLY. HOW do they fit that many calories into a wrap?!

synger
01-30-2013, 08:26 AM
No kidding. I was at applebee's last month and decided to have something different than something I knew the calories of. I had some sort of turkey chipotle wrap. I checked it out later on their website.

Turkey and a wrap. Guesses?

1000 calories. No wonder America is so large.

That doesn't actually surprise me. I'd figure about 200 for the tortilla itself, and another 200-300 for the meat, depending on amount and whether it's glazed/sauced. 200 for whatever sauce they put on it. 100-200 for any cheese. 100 for any olives/nuts. Veggies will be negligible, but if they add rice or beans that can be another 100 or so.

It really adds up!

April Snow
01-30-2013, 08:38 AM
A lot of restaurants also use much more butter and/or oil than we use at home to cook the same things. They taste good but those calories sure do add up quickly!

I've just been planning out what I'm going to get when I go out to dinner on Saturday. and being blown away by some of what I'm seeing on the menu - some entrees that are over 2000 calories! I know the portions are huge but eating half, even 1/3 is still a lot and I wonder how many people limit themselves to that much.

betsy2013
01-30-2013, 10:55 AM
I am so glad that we're beginning to see restaurants openly post their calorie counts. A couple of counties here in WA require a printed guide of complete nutritional info to be presented along with the menus. It's wonderful although I imagine that people like me drive the server crazy because sometimes it takes a while to find something that is both low in calories and carbs. I'd love to see this trend spread throughout the state and the country.

elvislover324
01-30-2013, 11:14 AM
We just have to remember that the restaurants posting their nutrition info, esp. for sandwiches, do not include the french fries, the chips, the cookie, etc. (or the drink!) that most seem to add. I think it applies more to a la carte places where you order a sandwich and then add your sides vs. a dish coming with mashed potatoes or french fries. And even then, those are just estimates depending on who is making the plate! Sometimes we get extra fries, sometimes we don't!

Goddess Jessica
01-30-2013, 11:26 AM
At my WeightWatchers meeting there's a huge joke about this restaurant in California called "Islands". I don't tend to eat at restaurant chains so I didn't know a lot about the restaurant. Everyone at the meeting was talking about the (heavy on the sarcasm) "healthy chicken sandwich" (complete with eye rolls and laughter). I was confused so I asked about it and they're like, "Oh if you go into Islands and look at the menu, this looks like a really healthy choice until you go home and look it up."

So I went home and looked it up.

This is the description: SHOREBIRD
Grilled chicken breast, pickles, swiss, lettuce, tomato, onion & mayo on an Islands white or whole wheat bun

Okay, seriously, I could NOT fault people for thinking this was a wise choice! I would have ordered it. Grilled chicken breast, no weird cheese or sauces.

So I looked up the nutritional information. WITHOUT anything else:
Shorebird

What`s in it?
CHICKEN BREAST; BUN; SWISS CHEESE; TOMATO; MAYONNAISE; PICKLES; LETTUCE

SERVING PER CONTAINER 1
SERVING SIZE (oz) 18
CALORIES 950
CALORIES FROM FAT 440
TOTAL FAT (g) 49
SATURATED FAT (g) 14
TRANS FAT (g) 0.5
CHOLESTEROL (mg) 170
SODIUM (mg) 1480
CARBOHYDRATES (g) 65
FIBER (g) 3
PROTEIN (g) 62

SERIOUSLY??!

Elladorine
01-30-2013, 11:31 AM
While we were eating, we were near the line of people waiting to order their food. I overheard a couple standing in line. It was a middle aged couple out with their teenaged son. I see the mom scanning the menu and she said, "I think I'm going to get X. It's not so bad with calories." Dad said (and he was not thin). Whe the he$$ cares about the calories. Just get what you want. She asked him, "So what are you getting?" And the father and son said some enormously high calorie meal. Mom tried to say something but it was falling on deaf ears.

I found that so interesting as the information was right there in front of them - LISTED, not hidden and the dad (and son and my mentee) didn't care about it and ignored it. Even before I was on a weight loss effort, seeing the caloric count DEFINITELY would have influenced me to eat something lighter calorie. I'm shocked that it's not universal.
I wish all places would list calorie counts right on the menus, it would make my life so much easier. And I don't even count calories! But I want to make sure whatever I'm eating has a reasonable amount. At least we live in an age where we can typically look things up ahead of time or even on our phones?

I've read that those in argument against potentially requiring calorie counts on menus state that some customers will equate high calories as being more tasty or satisfying and will go for those items anyway. :dizzy: I say people should be informed regardless, especially when something that appears healthy on the surface (like a salad or wrap) happens to have over 1000 calories!

Then again, people have to be informed about what calories actually are, and how many they should be having a day. Do they teach any of this in school these days? Being oblivious and downright ignorant is a big reason so many struggle with their weight; there's an insane disconnect between calories, portion sizes, and weight control. Heh, my ex? He was going to eat what he damned well pleased, and became increasingly hostile as I started to become calorie aware. And at the same time he'd cry over being so fat and claimed that it wasn't his fault. Look dude, you can't just shrug off eating healthy and expect to be healthy.

No kidding. I was at applebee's last month and decided to have something different than something I knew the calories of. I had some sort of turkey chipotle wrap. I checked it out later on their website.

Turkey and a wrap. Guesses?

1000 calories. No wonder America is so large.
At places like Applebee's, Chili's, and any other chain I don't even look beyond the "lite" menus (with the exception of soup, and even then I'll look up the nutrition info). Just a quick glance through their nutrition information shows that their meals are easily 800-1200 calories or more, not including the side they are served with. If they have something at a reasonable number of calories, you can bet they're going to shove it into the "lite" section.

Flowers
01-30-2013, 11:33 AM
I care about what i eat , that is why mu lunch will consist of sea fish and salad. Occasionally I eat steak and burger.

bethFromDayton
01-30-2013, 11:55 AM
Our first trip to Applebees (now a regular destination because of their 550 menu), the seasonal vegetables were broccoli. I hate broccls. There were a bunch of alternatives--mashed potates, french fries, and finally she said salad was available for an upcharge. So I asked for a salad--with the dressing on the side. I asked what was on the salad, and I asked for 'no cheese'. When she brought it out, it had bacon on it. I had her make another one--I didn't want the bacon and you can't just pick it out.

Now, when we go to Applebee's, I order my salad (230 calories w/o dressing) disassembled--dressing, cheese, and bacon on the side, with a to-go container. Half the salad, all the bacon and cheese go in that for the next day's lunch. Their dressing is high in calorie, but I use it very sparingly (and use my own at lunch).

I do like the steak with garlic herbed shrimp, though, which has 500 calories as plated.

I've never been this calorie consious before--and am learning that most things have more calories than I'd expect. There are things I'm realizing I may never eat again--a bit disappointing, but so is being this big.

synger
01-30-2013, 12:37 PM
I am so glad that we're beginning to see restaurants openly post their calorie counts. A couple of counties here in WA require a printed guide of complete nutritional info to be presented along with the menus. It's wonderful although I imagine that people like me drive the server crazy because sometimes it takes a while to find something that is both low in calories and carbs. I'd love to see this trend spread throughout the state and the country.

My county has a calorie statement law, and I am very grateful.

At my WeightWatchers meeting there's a huge joke about this restaurant in California called "Islands". I don't tend to eat at restaurant chains so I didn't know a lot about the restaurant. Everyone at the meeting was talking about the (heavy on the sarcasm) "healthy chicken sandwich" (complete with eye rolls and laughter). I was confused so I asked about it and they're like, "Oh if you go into Islands and look at the menu, this looks like a really healthy choice until you go home and look it up."

So I went home and looked it up.

This is the description: SHOREBIRD
Grilled chicken breast, pickles, swiss, lettuce, tomato, onion & mayo on an Islands white or whole wheat bun

Okay, seriously, I could NOT fault people for thinking this was a wise choice! I would have ordered it. Grilled chicken breast, no weird cheese or sauces.

So I looked up the nutritional information. WITHOUT anything else:
Shorebird

What`s in it?
CHICKEN BREAST; BUN; SWISS CHEESE; TOMATO; MAYONNAISE; PICKLES; LETTUCE

SERVING PER CONTAINER 1
SERVING SIZE (oz) 18
CALORIES 950
CALORIES FROM FAT 440
TOTAL FAT (g) 49
SATURATED FAT (g) 14
TRANS FAT (g) 0.5
CHOLESTEROL (mg) 170
SODIUM (mg) 1480
CARBOHYDRATES (g) 65
FIBER (g) 3
PROTEIN (g) 62

SERIOUSLY??!

Easily done: a big breast, marinated or brushed with an oily glaze/dressing (250-300), on a big bun (could be 200 for the bun alone, more if it's brushed with oil/butter and toasted on the grill; the fact that the sandwich has 65 carbs, and most will come from the bun, means it's huge), with two slices of cheese (200 or so) and extra mayo/dressing (easily 150-200).

Even "naked" -- chicken with cheese and veggies, with mayo on the side -- the dish is probably 500 or so.

We just have to remember that the restaurants posting their nutrition info, esp. for sandwiches, do not include the french fries, the chips, the cookie, etc. (or the drink!) that most seem to add. I think it applies more to a la carte places where you order a sandwich and then add your sides vs. a dish coming with mashed potatoes or french fries. And even then, those are just estimates depending on who is making the plate! Sometimes we get extra fries, sometimes we don't!

I tend to order a la carte even if they don't offer it. When my book club goes to IHOP, I often order a poached egg in a bowl, a side of spinach (from one of their dinners), and a cup of tea. Or just corned beef hash and a poached egg. Instead of charging me for the corned beef and eggs platter (which includes pancakes and hashbrowns, or something carby like that) and taking them off, they just ring each thing separately.

Also I'm very confident in ordering a side veggie that doesn't appear as a side if it's mentioned in the menu. So your chicken sandwich has mushrooms? I want a side of sauteed mushrooms. Your veggie omelet has spinach in it? I want a side of sauteed spinach. Any chef should be able to do such simple dishes, and I'm willing to pay a little more to get exactly what I want.

mnemosyne
01-30-2013, 01:08 PM
It's interesting to me how much we in the States expect 'sides' to come with everything. I've traveled abroad a fair amount, and it has helped me to recognize that most people do NOT assume that a sandwich should be accompanied by fries or chips at all times.

In Lima, Peru - my first lunch there was a "combo" meal that included a sandwich, a drink (Inca Cola Zero for the win), and a small packaged... chocolate thingy, but no fries or chips. And this in the home of the potato!

At places like Applebee's, Chili's, and any other chain I don't even look beyond the "lite" menus (with the exception of soup, and even then I'll look up the nutrition info). Just a quick glance through their nutrition information shows that their meals are easily 800-1200 or more calories, not including the side they are served with. If they have something at a reasonable number of calories, you can bet they're going to shove it into the "lite" section.

Heh. This, so much this. If they do not tell you the calories (trumpeting it as a LITE choice), you can safely assume that the meal is INSANE.

Pink Hurricane
01-30-2013, 01:28 PM
First, I LOVE PANERA!!! So props to you for enjoying it there haha!

Second, I find their website extremely useful for seeing what I know I can eat on their menu without regret, because they do have some tasty, fulfilling options. I am not sure if this is everywhere, but at the Panera restaurant here they show the calories on their menu in the store, the rest of the info is online. As far as pastries I just walk right past them, every now and then I will get a smaller treat if I can fit it into my caloric budget or plan for it. Otherwise I just enjoy all of their other yummy options!

AnnRue
01-30-2013, 01:48 PM
Frankly, it was only when I accepted that perhaps all foods outside my direct control where either (1) lying about their calories or (2) not at all accurate, was when I finally got the key to losing all my weight.

I did a weight loss program with prepackaged food. The first film they showed you at orientation was what happened when they went into a hospital and got a muffin at the cafeteria. It did not seem massive. They tested it. How many calories? 1100. No one... no one would have thought that. It was also some crazy amount of fat.

The diet program called this "the gap" -- the difference between what you might think something is, and what it actually is.

Even with the alleged calorie counts you just can't know exactly how much each thing is.. it is just a rough estimate.

And if you wanted to be really negative about it... you could argue that it isn't in the best interest of food makers or eateries to really be honest about the calories... that their food tastes amazing because it has gads of sugar in it, but, the calorie count says it is 400 cals... when really likely 600.

berryblondeboys
01-30-2013, 02:02 PM
Frankly, it was only when I accepted that perhaps all foods outside my direct control where either (1) lying about their calories or (2) not at all accurate, was when I finally got the key to losing all my weight.

I did a weight loss program with prepackaged food. The first film they showed you at orientation was what happened when they went into a hospital and got a muffin at the cafeteria. It did not seem massive. They tested it. How many calories? 1100. No one... no one would have thought that. It was also some crazy amount of fat.

The diet program called this "the gap" -- the difference between what you might think something is, and what it actually is.

Even with the alleged calorie counts you just can't know exactly how much each thing is.. it is just a rough estimate.

And if you wanted to be really negative about it... you could argue that it isn't in the best interest of food makers or eateries to really be honest about the calories... that their food tastes amazing because it has gads of sugar in it, but, the calorie count says it is 400 cals... when really likely 600.

That's why when people say, "I measure everything" there's only so much you can measure. I 'measure' everything too, but when I say I eat a fuji apple, how many calories is that really? Fujis are HUGE, but not always. That goes for any fruit.

Now, cheese. Let's say I want a 1/4 cup of shredded cheese. How do I know if that is a loosely 'sifted' cheese or a packed in cheese?" is 2% milk always precisely 2% and so on.

So, I never know for sure how many calories I ingest, so I know I have to be flexible in my thinking on it. Falsely believing I have 50 extra calories for the day for a bite of a snack when in reality I might be over by 150 calories.

AnnRue
01-30-2013, 02:48 PM
Now, cheese. Let's say I want a 1/4 cup of shredded cheese. How do I know if that is a loosely 'sifted' cheese or a packed in cheese?" is 2% milk always precisely 2% and so on.

A few years ago in my area a local news outlet tested fish at local shops and restaurants. Guess what? Most of the fish was NOT what it said it was. You thought you were getting haddock. Sorry, you were getting a completely different fish - much cheaper and less healthy. And guess what.. after this story came out and there were pledges to change, the outlet did the testing again, nothing had changed.

With that in mind, how can anyone really be sure what they are eating is what it says it is? I mean in the 1990s they required the nutrition facts on food. But does anyone ever check those? I doubt it. The very idea that the FDA could keep up with testing even 20% of the food is imho super unlikely.

Yet a lot of my calorie counting friends just can't give up the ghost and say but I am eating 1200 cals.. why am I not losing... um ... how do you really know that? It really does a wammy on their head too because they feel hungry if they go down to what they think is 1000 cals but I bet if we tested the food it might be 1500 cals. So they shouldn't be hungry but the power of suggestion makes them think they are.