Exercise! - trying to improve speed and endurance




neurodoc
01-27-2013, 03:16 PM
I'm an absolutely terrible runner, always have been (I'm clearly built for strength, not for speed), but this fall I injured my shoulder, and despite staying away from lifting for awhile, and getting PT, it never got better, so I finally had surgery 2 weeks ago. It will be several more weeks before I'm allowed to even start PT, and another 6 weeks before I can return to weight training, so in the meantime, I'm trying to work on my cardiovascular fitness.

Currently, I can comfortably jog at a 10-minute mile pace (treadmill setting of "6") for up to 3 miles. If I push harder, to a 9 minute mile, I am too winded by 1/2 mile to keep it up, and end up having to drop the speed down to about an 11-minute mile for awhile to compensate, so I never get below an average of 10-minute/mile, and I am definitely pooped at that speed after 3 miles. Does anyone know of a C25K-like system, that will help you get faster/gain more endurance? My initial goal is two back-to-back 8 minute miles, and then to do 3 miles in 25 minutes. How hard is it to go from where I am to that? If you can do that, what did you do to get there?


CherryPie99
01-27-2013, 06:22 PM
I started running for the first time a couple of years ago. I was running at a speed of 4.2 MPH! When I first started running outside I was running a 16 minutes mile.

The advice that I was given by seasoned runners was to run MORE and not worry at all about speed and speed would come naturally. That's what I did and I just ran 8 miles today (outside) at 8 minute miles (some a little more, some a little less, but the average was 8).

FWIW I run faster outside then on the tready.

Jen

slimmingsi
01-29-2013, 08:44 AM
get the C25k program, work through the program but instead of walk/ run. pick 2 speeds. run at 9min mile pace walk at slower than you currently find easy still a jog but an easy one.

Work through the program. this is essentiall Fartlek training where you vary the speed to increase it.


slimmingsi
01-29-2013, 08:46 AM
The advice that I was given by seasoned runners was to run MORE and not worry at all about speed and speed would come naturally.

I got told exactly the same thing. Its time on our feet that counts closely followed by distance covered and lastly speed.

as you can go longer and greater distances you will get quicker

AlmostMe
01-29-2013, 12:00 PM
RunKeeper - a free app, has some free training programmes designed to help you increase speed for a 5k. I am also a very slow runner. I am just finishing c25k next week - then I'm going onto one of these training programmes to help me run a 5k faster. Then I'm going on another free programme to run a sub 65 min 10K. I very much doubt I'll run that fast, but I think my times can come down a LOT.

slimmingsi
01-29-2013, 12:50 PM
Then I'm going on another free programme to run a sub 65 min 10K. I very much doubt I'll run that fast, but I think my times can come down a LOT.

Which program is that? i need to do this i'm doing a cross country event thats on a 10k course i've put down to do 80mins per lap so 65min on road is about right.

AlmostMe
01-29-2013, 02:43 PM
If you have runkeeper go to the website (you can't find it in-app) and look for training plans, there are quite a few. sub-65 is the slowest one they have for a 10K (!!!) But it has lots of speed work. I figure even if it doesn't get me to those times it should improve my time. It alternates longer runs with fartleks, tempo runs, etc.

Nikel1979
01-29-2013, 06:51 PM
I started running for the first time a couple of years ago. I was running at a speed of 4.2 MPH! When I first started running outside I was running a 16 minutes mile.

The advice that I was given by seasoned runners was to run MORE and not worry at all about speed and speed would come naturally. That's what I did and I just ran 8 miles today (outside) at 8 minute miles (some a little more, some a little less, but the average was 8).

FWIW I run faster outside then on the tready.

Jen

Just running more has been working for me. I'm still crazy slow. However, I'm getting faster without doing any speed work. I started running in August, and I was around a 17 min mile then. Now my short runs are around a 12:30 min mile. I'm still around a 14 on my long runs.

For endurance, just keep adding a little distance at a time. The general rule is to increase your weekly mileage by no more than 10% per week.

AlmostMe
01-30-2013, 05:20 AM
I think the 'just running more' is useful for most people, but I need to sprint faster for its own sake - as I want to play rugby. I want to be fast enough to tackle those pesky backs.

Nikel1979
01-30-2013, 07:13 AM
Fartleks and hills are supposed to be good to improve speed. Just don't push too hard. Maybe it's just me, but slow is better than injured. And the slow, longer runs will build endurance, which also improves speed on your shorter distances. Speed can be slow to come, but don't let it discourage you.