Weight Loss Support - Please help! I beg you to help me.




Kindness
01-23-2013, 04:39 PM
First of all, I love this blog, absolutely love the science, the facts behind it. But I am so confused, basically tired of all the info I have read. I have no science background and feel lost in all this. Also, I have had information overload from all new and old theories of fat loss, some say do slow carb, some say be gluten free, some say eat lots of fat, some don't touch sugar, some talk about no to little exercise, some talk about running at max heart rate 5 days a week. I am honestly breaking down.

I am only 33 years old, I am 75 pounds overweight, have high blood pressure and am pre-diabetic (even came out positive for diabetes in a fasting test once). I am tired all day, no mental capacity, and here I was a bright guy and now I can't even think clearly.

I need your help. A few kind souls, could you kindly help me in providing a clearly laid out structure of diet and exercise that I should follow to lose all this weight and come out of prediabetes and help with my hypertension. or could you kindly answer these questions, point by point, in easier to understand details. I will be extremely grateful to you:

1) So should I stick with slow carb but high protein diet, or how about high fat diet with slow carb or gluten free diet. Please let me know what kind of diet should a human being stick to all their life for better health and to lose weight. Please, kindly break it down into details as how many calories in total per day rough estimates of how many from protein, carbs and fat? and anything else you could think of.

2) Is there certain kind of "nutrient" I should not consume at all or mostly stay away from like fructose, transfat, Gluten? What kind of stuff would be a strict no-no? Please share as much as you can. Please.

3) Does Omega 3 supplements are really good for cardiac health and weight loss too? If yes, then how much should be consumed everyday?

4) What about exercise, should I do High Intentsity weight training everyday? Or cardiac aerobic exercises everyday? Strength training, weight training, resistance training, what exactly and how much?

5) What's up all the insulin sensitivity, insensitivity and resistance. What's the best way to deal with it, make it perfect so that it doesn't harm me. What kind of exercise, diet makes it better so that it doesn't effect my organs and physical health. My blood pressure seemed to be caused by sugars I think.

6) Is there a really blueprint of diet and exercise humans should do or shouldn't do. Please help me.

Please forgive me for all the confusion but please do share everything and anything you know. PLEASE HELP ME SAVE MY LIFE. Karma will take care of you for this kindness. Please and thank you!

- A very confused and broken man.


Airycuh
01-23-2013, 05:00 PM
Personally, I do not believe there is a specific blueprint for weigh loss and what to stay away from. Everyone's body will react differently. However, the best rule of thumb is to start eating right (high protein, low amounts of carbs-pasta, grains and lots of whole or organic fruits and veggies).

The more in control of your diet and what you put into your body, the better your blood sugars will respond and no longer spike or flat line. My dad died of diabetes and I know what it can do to break a person down. Seeing as I am not a physician, I would recommend talking with your doctor to discuss how to take preventative measures.

As far as exercise is concerned, find a program that works best for you. One that fits your lifestyle and your capabilities. You can never go wrong with cardio or strength training. Cardio will burn off the fat where as strength training will build the muscle. Target certain areas if you feel necessary.

Keep in mind that this was my own personal advice. It might not be what others do or what is best for you. And seeing that I am at the beginning of my weight loss journey as well, I have much to learn.

I am very confident that you are in the right place and will find the support needed here. You are already very knowledgable and asking all the right questions. Stay positive and you will be sure to succeed!

Arctic Mama
01-23-2013, 05:11 PM
I'm not seeing a link if you included it. But long story short, pick a diet you're comfortable with and can stick to. Then stick to it. It's that simple (not easy, granted!). Calorie counting, low carb, high protein, all are fine starting points.

I personally prefer low carb/high fat/moderate protein (Atkins) and watch my calorie totals as well. But you're not me, your mileage may vary.


Arctic Mama
01-23-2013, 05:13 PM
As for insulin resistance, most folks with moderate to high abdominal obesity, who've eaten a standard American diet for most of their lives, have a degree of insulin resistance. Plans that control that are definitely beneficial and I am a big proponent of them - again, they tend to be high fat/low carb and protein levels vary.

Arctic Mama
01-23-2013, 05:15 PM
Exercise is a seperate beast. I'd get your eating well in line before worrying about that, but no matter what you choose (unless it is extremely low intensity) the workout schedule of 4-5 days a week is plenty - the body needs rest. I highly recommend strength training and have found it more beneficial for less time spent than interval training. But this, like diet, is intensely personal and varies wildly.

The best exercise, like diet, is the one you enjoy and consistently stick with.

Candeka
01-23-2013, 05:16 PM
Choose what you feel you would be able to stick with. I stick with calorie counting and it has made me lose close to 30 pounds. I could never ever do the "low carb, no sugar, no grains" that some people do. I like to have freedom to eat whatever I want. If a diet is to restrictive, I wouldn't even last a 3 days on it. I do watch my protien/fat/carb using an app on my Iphone however.

novangel
01-23-2013, 05:18 PM
I'm going to simplify this a bit. It's calories in vs. calories out, period. I don't do specific diets (low carb or gluten free) because I can't sustain them for life. I eat everything in moderation (portion control) and avoid obvious high calorie/sugary foods like fettucchini alfredo, cake and soda. In fact I drink zero calories 99% of the time. I make better choices than I used to.

Sign up on Myfitnesspal.com and enter in your weight/height, and what your goal weight is and it will calculate your caloric allowance for the day with a 500 calorie defecit in order for you to lose. Everyone's allowance is a little different but I don't know your weight and height. Log EVERYTHING you put in your mouth every single day. Start there. Educate yourself on calories because that's the main issue.

Exercise: I can't tell you what to do because I don't know your physical limitations. If you can jog and lift weights great, if not swim laps or walk. Exercise at least 5 days a week for minimum 30 minutes but check with a doctor first before doing any high intensity cardio. If you can't get outside or a gym look into DVD's like P90X. Again, I don't know your limitations.

As you lose your BP should come down as well as your risk for diabetes. My BP came down a lot.

I take 1,000mgs a day of fish oil with Omega3's for heart health and cholesterol but it doesn't aid me in weight loss.

Browse around these forums, tons of information here as well as some threads about insulin resistance. Good luck.

Spiritix
01-23-2013, 05:27 PM
Okay, first of all, calm down, and welcome to the forums.
Right now, I get the impression you're stressing out about becoming diabetic and encountering more health problems. Yes, that's something to worry about, but if you stress out too much about it, you're only hurting yourself more.
The very first lesson in weight loss is realizing that weight loss isn't simply getting rid of the weight, it's a lifestyle change. You'll have to make small, gradual changes into a healthier way to live, and then that's when you'll start feeling better.
Now to answer your questions:

1.) There are many diets to choose from, and it just depends on what works for you. If you try a diet, and it isn't working, then quit it and try something else. But the general formula is the same: cut back on calories, and eat healthier foods. By "healthier foods", I mean fruits, veggies, lean meats, whole grains, and water. It's quite simple, really. Some diets tell you to not eat grains, or not eat meat, but like I said, it depends on what works for you.

2.) I'm not completely sure on what all is completely forbidden, but know that the foods I listed above don't have anything bad in them, unless you're allergic to something. Once you've been hanging around the healthy foods for awhile, you'll be able to tell what isn't good, like basically everything at McDonald's, or anything super sugary like candy, that isn't fruit. Conversely, it's okay to eat these things like once in a blue moon, it won't kill you, but I think once you've got the hang of everything, you won't want to eat bad things, because you can tell how much worse they make you feel.

3.) Omega-3 is good for the heart, yes, and can be found naturally in fish, which counts as a lean meat. If you're going to take supplements, you'd probably only need one a day, but your situation may or may not be different. Keep in mind that too much of anything can end up being bad, so don't freak out and take too many a day.

4.) Exercise is one of those things you'll have to ease your way into. Exercise will have to become a habit, and not just something you feel like doing. You can do any form of cardio you want, whether it be running, biking, swimming, dancing, it's up to you. Start small, don't decide you're going to run a mile right out of the gate. Weight training is definitely beneficial, but it's optional. Cardio will have a larger impact.
Try to start exercising three days a week at a pace you can do. If you start running like I did, try only doing a quarter of a mile, switching between walking and running. Heck, you could start by simply walking, whatever's best for you. There are free exercise plans all over the Internet, and you can modify them yourself if you need more time or feel like you can skip some.

5.) I don't really know anything about insulin... :\ I'm sorry...

6.) Well... there are theories as to what exactly humans are supposed to be doing. I know there's this online program called The Primal Blueprint that encourages barefoot running, no grains, and more. But we've evolved in such a way that I don't really think it matters too much anymore as long as you're doing all the good stuff. Just stick with those healthy foods, like I've said, and you should be good.

There are many other things that people tend to do to keep up with a healthy lifestyle, like meditating, yoga, and so on. On the weight loss journey, you shouldn't ever feel pressured to do something. Think about the benefits of what you're doing, and if there's something you just absolutely don't like, then don't do it! I know I'm not all that fond of veggies... but I like fruits alright, so I've started eating them more. I've been drinking more water and walking/running more. Just pick what you want to do and take it slow. :)
I'd also suggest making goals, for the short-term. A good goal would be losing five pounds a month, or two pounds a week. Fitness goals work too.
And finally, don't give up! Can't stress that enough! :D

mandalinn82
01-23-2013, 05:38 PM
1) So should I stick with slow carb but high protein diet, or how about high fat diet with slow carb or gluten free diet. Please let me know what kind of diet should a human being stick to all their life for better health and to lose weight. Please, kindly break it down into details as how many calories in total per day rough estimates of how many from protein, carbs and fat? and anything else you could think of.

Ultimately, weight loss is about calories in vs. calories out - if what you burn is more than what you eat, you lose weight. The percentages of proteins, carbs, and fat (called "macronutrients") that each person loses and feels best on tends to be highly individual. A lot of people have luck on a diet that is about 40% carb, 30% protein, and 30% fat. That is a reasonable place to start from. Without your stats on height and weight, it's hard to say that that equates to, but let's say you were aiming to eat 2000 calories a day. At those ratios, you'd be eating about 200g of carbs, 150g of protein, and about 66g of fat. But sticking to a calorie goal is probably more important for weight loss than hitting any ratio of macronutrients.

Once you've started from there, you can adjust...fewer carbs if you find yourself hungry, etc. But that's as good a place to start out as any, IMO.

2) Is there certain kind of "nutrient" I should not consume at all or mostly stay away from like fructose, transfat, Gluten? What kind of stuff would be a strict no-no? Please share as much as you can. Please.

Transfat is pretty universally regarded as terrible, and in addition, is really only found in junky processed foods that won't help your body run at optimum. Beyond that, I don't personally call anything "off limits". Again, you'll find as you go along what foods make you feel hungrier, what foods are the best use of your calories, etc. Other people put more strict rules in place (don't eat anything you can't pronounce, eat only unprocessed foods, etc). One of my favorite fitness gurus, Jillian Michaels, says that 80% of your calories should come from whole foods (fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, dairy, whole grains, etc) and the remaining 20% can come from whatever you like, although she does also recommend avoiding trans fats and high fructose corn syrup.

3) Does Omega 3 supplements are really good for cardiac health and weight loss too? If yes, then how much should be consumed everyday?

There is no evidence that supplementing Omega-3 does much. There IS evidence that increasing Omega-3 in the DIET, by eating salmon or grass fed meats, for example, helps in overall health, but supplements have mixed research behind them. I'd ask your doctor what supplements he recommends for you.

4) What about exercise, should I do High Intentsity weight training everyday? Or cardiac aerobic exercises everyday? Strength training, weight training, resistance training, what exactly and how much?


It's not possible to prescribe a fitness program for you without knowing a lot more about how active you are currently. Any movement you do beyond what you're doing now will improve your fitness level and increase your calorie burn. Weight training is awesome, and helps to both burn calories and build muscle mass. Cardio is good for conditioning and again, calorie burn. Here is a great beginners guide to fitness from WebMD: http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/guide/fitness-beginners-guide

5) What's up all the insulin sensitivity, insensitivity and resistance. What's the best way to deal with it, make it perfect so that it doesn't harm me. What kind of exercise, diet makes it better so that it doesn't effect my organs and physical health. My blood pressure seemed to be caused by sugars I think

Here's a great summary on what insulin resistance is. http://diabetes.webmd.com/guide/insulin-resistance-syndrome

Basically, when you eat carbohydrate, your body produces insulin to move the sugar from that carbohydrate out of your bloodstream and into your cells so it can power your cell processes. If your body is constantly flooded with insulin by a poor diet, eventually, the cells in the body stop responding as well to that insulin. When that happens, they can't move the sugar in the flood as effectively into the cells as they could before, when they were responding normally, so blood sugar rises. The body pumps out more and more insulin in order to get the cells to respond to it, which is how insulin resistance progresses to diabetes.

Regular exercise and a more balanced diet of whole foods have been shown to make an improvement in insulin resistance. Many people find that reducing carbohydrates below the 40% threshold makes a difference, too.

6) Is there a really blueprint of diet and exercise humans should do or shouldn't do. Please help me.

If being here for so long has taught me anything, it's that different things work for different people. I do believe that there is a plan that works best for an individual, and that once that individual finds that plan, weight loss and maintenance gets easier, but I definitely do not think that plan is the same for everyone. Some basic principles, though, are universal - eat less, eat foods that are healthier and less processed, and move more.

ghost
01-23-2013, 05:39 PM
Dear very confused and broken man,

The reason why there are so many differing opinions on diets out there is because every body is different and what works for one body might not work for the next. The best bet is to find what works for YOUR BODY and your lifestyle and stick with it. Consistency is key in diet and lifestyle change.

All the information here is a lot to absorb, and many of us have absorbed it through trial and error with many different diet plans before finding what works for us. Take a deeeeeeep breath and then make a pro and con list based on what diet plan you are currently interested in. Does it restrict carbs? Can you live without carbs? Does it restrict calories? Does it restrict fat? Are these things you can integrate into your lifestyle? Can you live with never eating meat again, like in a vegetarian diet? Consider YOUR preferences and then go from there.

When your medical provider gave you your new diagnosis did he/she perhaps offer to give you a referral to a registered dietitian? If that is a service that is available to you I highly recommend meeting with one, going over your latest set of labs and exams and working up a plan.

gymrat05
01-23-2013, 05:49 PM
It sounds like you're really overwhelmed by all the information out there, so I would start with something really simple like counting calories. Eat the foods you want but portion everything, weigh everything and count everything. Leafy green vegetables (spinach, kale, etc.) are unlimited. Don't even count them. Eat those until your full and drink 8 glasses of water a day.

In terms of how many calories you should eat I would google "BMR calculator" and punch in all your information. There are tons out there. Whatever number it gives you, that's what you eat per day.

With calorie counting people start to realize that you get more food and feel fuller longer if you choose healthier options. The first couple of days you will be hungry. Try and tough it out and not eat beyond your BMR. Your body is adjusting. It takes a little time.

Keep in mind that simply by reducing your bodyweight you will help your prediabetes. Don't get too caught up in macros (carbs, proteins and fats) right now. Count calories for a couple of weeks, drink your water and then you can start worrying about other things.

One suggestion I will make is to try and never just eat carbs. So, for example, don't just have pasta for dinner...have pasta with chicken in it. Pairing the carbs with protein will keep you fuller for longer and slow your insulin release.

And as for exercise, do something you like...or just start walking. Again, you can gradually start adding in different kinds of exercise but the last thing you want to do now is start a program you won't be able to sustain. Go slow. Weight training is fantastic but if you're struggling with your diet and your exercise and feeling a lot of pressure to do everything at once you won't be able to keep up with the program

After eating exactly your BMR for a couple of weeks you can start to reduce it. Cut back anywhere from 250-500 calories per day. You can even alternate - 250 one day, 500 the next. Once you're comfortable there start playing with your macros. See how you feel with less grains, less starches, more protein. Make substitutions - for things you would normally eat. Try new meals. Etc.

In terms of what nutrients to eat: Fructose is fruit sugar. High Fructose Corn Syrup is what you want to avoid all the time. Also, trans fats. There are a few other topics that are more controversial but I would agree those two items are universally agreed upon as "bad".

Good luck! (And feel free to PM me if you have any questions)

bethFromDayton
01-23-2013, 06:02 PM
You'll hear it said that the best diet is one you can stick with.

We are all different--and we all respond differently to food. Some people crave carbs, and the more they eat them, the more they crave them. For those people, carb-restricted diets make sense, since once they give up the carbs, they can eat healthily.

Other people find counting calories works for them. Some people do better with packaged foods because they just eat what they're told. Other people (I'm one) do better with a more flexible plan. There isn't a right and wrong answer to this--it may take several diet plans before you find one that works well--or you may change just because you want to try something different.

I agree with gymrat05 that calorie counting is a good place to start. If you have a smartphone, download a calorie counting app. I think MyFitnessPal and LoseIt are the two mentioned here the most, but there are others. I don't think it matters if you get the "best" one--just that you have one. (I'd even suggest that it's worth getting a smart phone for, if you can afford it.)

If your insurance covers it, you may want to ask your doctor for advice--or a referral to a dietitian.

As for exercise, the same is true, as for diets--the best exercise is one you will do. If you're out of shape, start slow. Start with a 5 minute walk or a 10 minute walk and build up from there if you have to. Just get yourself moving.

You can do this--and you'll get lots of support here.

zoritsa
01-23-2013, 07:01 PM
First off...welcome! Second...I'm going to second the person who said sign up for Myfitnesspal.com .I just re-started there (had been doing the whole eat when hungry,eat slowly,stop when satisfied) a few days ago,just to see how I thought I was doing calorie-wise.I love that you can input your information and then it gives you an idea of how many calories you should be consuming as well as the fat/protein/sugar and so on.I can now tweak it and see what I should and shouldn't be eating before eating it.

Everyone has also said,that no one way of eating is right for each person.Start somewhere,like taking something out of your diet that isn't good and then go from there.I'm sure you'll find the right fit...just don't give up,and if you fall...pick yourself back up and dust yourself off.I have on a few occasions :rofl:

Lindsayanne716
01-23-2013, 07:15 PM
What I know about exercise for those with insulin resistance (i am one of them) is that the most beneficial exercises are "bursts". This is why weight lifting is beleived to be extremely beneficial to people with IR, more so than prolonged cardio as the burst is what will quickly burn your insulin off. I recommend you google a workout called "peak 8 intervals". it is basically a 20 minute workout that focuses on doing moderate intensity with 30 second burts of your absolute most effort and repeating 8 times. If you can't find it, pm me and I can explain the process further.

Lauren920
01-23-2013, 07:31 PM
Hi! Since you wanted these bullet pointed I will answer them as you have laid them out, but before I begin I just want to say everybody else has some great advice and you should really take that to heart as well! This will be a long post as I wanted to answer all of your questions to the best of my ability as requested, I hope you don't mind the reading.

1) So should I stick with slow carb but high protein diet, or how about high fat diet with slow carb or gluten free diet. Please let me know what kind of diet should a human being stick to all their life for better health and to lose weight. Please, kindly break it down into details as how many calories in total per day rough estimates of how many from protein, carbs and fat? and anything else you could think of.

Calorie counting is probably a good place to start, to at least give you a basic idea of how much you eat and how much you burn. For that, what you can first do is figure out your basal metabolic rate. There are calculators online for that that you can find very easily. This is the bare minimum of calories that your body burns at rest, without exercise or any of that other good stuff. One pound is 3500 calories, and by creating a deficit over time, your body will lose those pounds. EVERY diet is geared toward creating this deficit, however different diets work for different people. Basic calorie counting, as I said, will help you get started to decide what works for you. A website like MyFitnessPal will help you log what you eat, and how much of everything (calories, protein, carbohydrates, fat, etc) is in what you are eating. The general recommendation is to take your basal metabolic rate and decrease it to create a deficit. A 500 calorie decrease per day, for example, will result in a 3500 calorie deficit over one week. That's one pound a week. One-two pounds a week is considered a healthy pace, but it is not uncommon for people to lose more, especially at the beginning, or less, especially toward the end. If you add exercise into this plan, you will be able to eat more if you choose without gaining weight. Some people eat all of their exercise calories back, some eat back half, and some don't eat back their calories at all.

For me personally, I find that eating lean protein, plenty of vegetables, good quality carbohydrates (think brown instead of white, such as whole grain bread), and a small amount of fat keeps me happy and full without overdoing it in the calorie department. That type of eating plan may or may not work for you, but I thought maybe sharing what I do could give you some insight.

2) Is there certain kind of "nutrient" I should not consume at all or mostly stay away from like fructose, transfat, Gluten? What kind of stuff would be a strict no-no? Please share as much as you can. Please.

There is nothing you cannot have in moderation. The key to weight loss is to find something you can stick with, and putting one food STRICTLY off limits tends to make you want it more. Some people find that cutting out things like gluten or sugary sodas makes them feel better and makes their weight loss easier because they are motivated by their own strength and healthy choices. However, you can fit any food you want in moderation into a good plan if you want to.

3) Does Omega 3 supplements are really good for cardiac health and weight loss too? If yes, then how much should be consumed everyday?

I do not take omega three so can not help with this. I have heard good things about it but I would talk to your doctor before beginning any supplements.

4) What about exercise, should I do High Intentsity weight training everyday? Or cardiac aerobic exercises everyday? Strength training, weight training, resistance training, what exactly and how much?

A mix of cardio and strength is important to weight loss. If you lose weight rapidly, or even at an average pace, you may lose some muscle mass as well. Lean muscle takes up less space than fat, and increases your metabolism. Cardio helps create that calorie deficit, but it can also make you hungrier, so be sure to log your exercise and your food intake! I have just recently begun exercising seriously and I find that it helps motivate me. I never thought I would like physical activity. To start off, just start small. You can take a brisk walk for cardio, maybe for half a mile, for a few days one week. Maybe the next week, you increase that distance to 3/4 of a mile, or a whole mile, or maybe you begin running it instead. The same goes for weight training - start at a small weight, and work your way up.

5) What's up all the insulin sensitivity, insensitivity and resistance. What's the best way to deal with it, make it perfect so that it doesn't harm me. What kind of exercise, diet makes it better so that it doesn't effect my organs and physical health. My blood pressure seemed to be caused by sugars I think.

Obesity contributes to insulin resistance, prediabetes, and diabetes. These conditions make it harder to lose weight because the body is resistant to insulin, or does not use its insulin correctly. Weight loss is the perfect thing to keep these things from harming you, as weight loss can significantly improve these conditions. Your doctor will be able to tell you if you are resistant to insulin, and you should talk to him or her before you start your diet.

6) Is there a really blueprint of diet and exercise humans should do or shouldn't do. Please help me.

Unfortunately there is not one thing that will work for everybody, however, I CAN attest to the fact that if you consume less calories than you burn you WILL lose weight. Make baby steps at first - log what you eat without changing it, then begin making small changes instead. Perhaps you could walk to run an errand instead of driving, or you could make dinner at home instead of ordering out on Fridays. There is SUCH a good community here to help you with everything on your journey, and it can be overwhelming to have so much information and help. The good thing is that once you begin breaking things up into pieces, you can learn how to use all this information to your advantage.

The one piece of advice I have is to write everything down. It's amazing how much stuff can add up in one day, how much we can mindlessly eat without realizing it. Small changes here and there add up to a BIG payoff if you are motivated and stick with it. And, if you ever lose your motivation we will be here to kick your butt back into gear :D

Best of luck to you, please continue posting here if you need any help, guidance, motivation, or anything else.

MapleLeaf
01-23-2013, 07:41 PM
I'm type 2 diabetic and I felt exactly the same way when I was diagnosed. I felt exhausted constantly, desperate to make changes, and completely overwhelmed by all of the information out there.

There are tons of diets that people have found to be successful and some of them are wildly different. Some people thrive on low-carb/high-fat diets and others feel their best on low-fat/high-carb diets. There's a lot of truth in that "the best diet is the one you'll follow" saying.

There are a few things that do seem to be common in almost all successful diet plans though. Here is what I would personally recommend, especially since you are insulin resistant. (I am too.)

1. Cut down or eliminate high-sugar/high-glycemic food. Sugar, soda, desserts, etc. They will drive your blood sugar up, which will make your body release more insulin. High levels of insulin in your body will keep you feeling sick and exhausted. It will also make it harder for you to lose weight.

2. Increase the amount of fiber you eat. Fiber is filling and helps you eat less. It also helps you avoid your blood sugar shooting up after meals because it lowers the glycemic index of food. Eating a variety of vegetables every day will do more for your health than any vitamin or supplement could.

3. Exercise. If you're new to exercise, start with walking or something else low intensity, like swimming. Exercise will help you burn off excess sugar. It also builds muscle, which speeds your metabolism because muscle uses more calories-- even when your body is at rest.

4. Avoid trans fat. In general, unprocessed/whole foods are better than processed foods. I don't know anyone who advises eating trans fat anymore. It's not even legal to put it in food in some countries.

Ultimately, whatever path you can stick with for life is probably the best for you. The above "rules" are just what I personally find the most helpful and see most people (even on different diets) following. I am rooting for you!

Stars
01-23-2013, 08:08 PM
weight watchers is a really good program you should consider looking into.

forreal
01-23-2013, 08:37 PM
I think you should talk to your doctor. :mag:

JohnP
01-23-2013, 09:56 PM
A lot of good information in the responses thus far.

The reason it's confusing is that most people are trying to sell you something so they all claim to have secret information, the best program, a way to make it quick and easy etc.

I'm only going to tell you that:

Calories matter. How you restrict them is up to you but most people find low carb diets easiest to follow.

Lift weights. Find a good beginner program and stick with it. Starting strength or New Rules of Lifting are good. Just don't follow the diet advice in either one.

RavenWolf
01-23-2013, 10:41 PM
You have been given a lot of great advice!

I have quite a few pounds to lose myself, and had not exercised in years.

I started using My Fitness Pal, which people have advised you of. I track everything I eat or drink in their immediatly after eating or drinking it.

I drink a 16 ounce glass of ice cold water before every meal.

I only drink water during the day and have a glass of milk once a day.

Fill up on veggies, and measure your portions! (Break out the kitchen scale, measuring cups, and measuring spoons!) Measuring everything is of utmost importance!

Start walking. Even if you can only do 10 or 20 slow minutes the first day. Each day you go walking, try to go a minute or two longer. Your speed will increase as well. :) Keep hydrated!

Make sure you get enough potassium! I had a big scare and an ER visit due to a deficiency in potassium levels. My Fitness Pal has a break down you can look at to see the recommended daily amount for different values, as well as how many you have reached and how many you have left. This is really a valuable tool for me.

Try to reduce the sodium you take in daily.

As far as what particular diet you should follow, I suggest you talk to your doctor with your pre-diabetic condition. He or she should be able to give you some good food choice ideas.

Be prepared to cut out white carbs. If you currently eat a lot of these, be prepared for pretty intense cravings initially. When I would feel a craving come on, I would drink a glass of water and get out and walk for a few minutes. Distraction will be your best friend!!

Take the time to "search" the forum and you will learn a lot. There is a lot of support here, and I'm glad you found us! I've been here since January, and these great people are one of the main reasons I'm still motivated!

Welcome and hope I was able to help!!