Weight Loss Support - What lessons have you learned from re-gaining and re-losing weight?




April Snow
01-14-2013, 12:22 PM
This is far from my first time at the weight loss rodeo. And last time, I had more success than I have ever had before - I lost over 60 lbs. But then I gained back almost 60 lbs. :( I was so sure I had it figured out that time and I wasn't going to ever go back to being 250+ lbs.

Didn't quite get it right that time, but I am starting again, and this time, I'm trying to think long term and short term. I've found a way that works well for me to take weight off - got the short term covered. Now I just need to build on that and figure out how to KEEP weight off, long term.

I know I'm far from alone in following this pattern and gaining back most or all of what I lost (sometimes more!).

Let's share what we've learned from that experience, and why and how we can try to make sure this time really will be different!


NJChick78
01-14-2013, 12:27 PM
I just recently read an article that explaine one of the reasons we often gain back more weight than we lost is because you lost muscle during your weightloss. So this time I am doing push ups and crunches to help me maintain and build muscle while I lose.

bargoo
01-14-2013, 12:27 PM
I learned that each time I do that , not only do I regain what I lost but a few more pounds are added on each time.


Robin41
01-14-2013, 12:45 PM
What I learned is that there is no end point. Previous weight loss attempts always had a finish line. "I'm thin, I win, let's have pizza to celebrate!"

I've been at goal for several years now, and it's only because I monitor my food intake, exercise, and weight as consistently now as I did when I was trying to lose it.

Wheresmychin
01-14-2013, 12:46 PM
Last time I lost it was a very restrictive diet I was on and my exercise routine centered around sessions with a trainer at the gym. My trainer fell pregnant and our sessions ended. Thus begun my fall from Grace.


This time, I have found that I LOVE walking, can do it competitively - so I have the exercise sorted and don't need anyone else to rely on. Also my eating plan is awesome, it is not restrictive and I can see my self eating this way for the rest of my life.

I also use myfitnesspal to keep accountable and check in on this forum at least twice a week.

So for me, hopefully this is my formula for life time maintenance.

Don't be too hard on yourself. Forgive yourself and take it one day at a time.
For a while I was too scared to start my journey as I was overwhelmed by the amount of weight I had to loose. Eventually I just focused on " the next 5 pounds".

Good luck!

krampus
01-14-2013, 01:37 PM
Extremes don't work.

novangel
01-14-2013, 02:33 PM
That your skin bounces back less and less each time therefore I'm done with the yo-yo. I will never let my weight get out of control again.

elvislover324
01-14-2013, 02:41 PM
I am going to give myself a weight range (undecided yet) and then be accountable to myself either daily or weekly (depends how much I want to control myself, I have a feeling it's going to be daily). If I am out of my range, back to serious calorie counting and accountability.

It seems like every time I went back to gaining I never noticed (acknowledged?) until it was 50lbs or more. Then at that point, you throw in whatever shreds of the towel you were grasping and give up.

I am keeping a firm grip on myself this time. I don't know why this time is different but it is. And I am so happy about that.

angieand2girls
01-14-2013, 02:56 PM
I agree with all that is said here. One thing I had never done in the past is plan for maintenance. I saw weight loss as a finish line and then it was back to the unhealthy habits...which got me right back to where I was. This time, I actually have a 1 year maintenance plan for when I hit goal. The purpose is to stay conscious and in control because I never want to go back to where I came from.

pinkalarmclock
01-14-2013, 06:02 PM
Last time I lost weight I got obsessed with it. It was so exciting! Plus, I love learning and soak everything up like I sponge. So when I wasn't preparing meals or working out I was researching. I got really into it and did learn a lot. Eventually my obsessional interest in health left and I was tired of thinking about it at all. Once I feel I've "mastered" something I usually abandon it. Also, I had made some huge changes in diet (went vegan) that in the end I wasn't interested in maintaining.

This time I've been taking it slower and not obsessing about it. I'm making sure to keep interests on other things. Health/fitness is just one of the many things on my mind. I'm not just trying to get healthy and fit, I'm trying to get more into my other interests. Also, the changes in diet are something I can continue forever.

freelancemomma
01-14-2013, 07:39 PM
It is better to NOT keep certain things in the house. It doesn't mean I can never eat them, just that they're not sitting under my nose all the time.

Freelance
blog: www.englishgrammargripe.com

berryblondeboys
01-14-2013, 09:12 PM
Well, I learn that it's easy to get derailed. I've also learned that by giving up or giving in I'm only hurting myself. Well, that's not true. I also hurt my family because when I don't feel well, everyone in my family feels it too.

I learned also to forgive myself for being human. I make mistakes. I have weak moments. I have faults.

I am also learning that my carbs sensitivity is not just a response of my body to the sugars, but my brain too. I really, really need to stay away because it's so hard to get back on track when the brain thinks it needs sugar.

vabs
01-14-2013, 09:13 PM
This has to be something I can live with everyday, for the rest of my life. I ask myself, "is this how I want to live when I'm thin?" because the only difference is a few 100 calories. That's nothing!!! That's a few bites!

There's never going a point where I magically eat the right amount, just because I've lost the weight. It just ain't happening for me, lol. I'm going right back to the same environment, with the same triggers, and with the same food availability.

HungryHungryHippo
01-14-2013, 09:39 PM
I decided I wouldn't change the way I was eating once I reached goal. So far, it's worked. (I ended up losing a few extra pounds, but hey--I'll take it!)

memememe76
01-14-2013, 10:01 PM
Activity is key. While diet will ultimately determine my weight, exercise will affect what I put in my body.

I will always be vigilant and I'm a lot less apologetic about it.

I am not a better, smarter person just because I lost a lot of weight. I am not a worse, dumber person just because I regained the weight.

April Snow
01-15-2013, 11:09 AM
So much wisdom here!

A couple of the things that I'm specifically thinking about/working on is the idea that I don't have to be perfect about it, I just have to keep making progress. The last time I lost weight, I was obsessed and put a lot of time and energy and effort into staying completely on plan. That's not terrible, and I managed to even have a couple of minor slips without it derailing me. But then I just ran out of steam, and stopped. Period. And it's taken over a year to get back.

So I need to find a way to be on plan and make that commitment, but to not let it make me burn out. And to find ways to go with the flow when I have to, so that I can keep going long term.

The other big thing for me is the transition between actively losing weight and maintaining. I've never really been a maintainer. I used to think I was ok at it, and would tell myself that well, I'm too fat but at least I'm not gaining. Except that I was. And the last go round, I did the same exact thing - went from losing weight (and doing a good job at it!) to gaining weight. Nothing in between. So I have to accept that even if I reach a point where I need to take a break from losing, I still need to work at maintaining. The plan I follow even has a specific phase for that transition but I never even tried it, it was just like a light switch on and off. This time, I need to have a dimmer switch so I can find the right point in between on and off.

BeachBreeze2010
01-15-2013, 11:15 AM
Well, I learn that it's easy to get derailed. I've also learned that by giving up or giving in I'm only hurting myself. Well, that's not true. I also hurt my family because when I don't feel well, everyone in my family feels it too.

^^This! I relaxed A LOT on the time I spent exercising and found it hard to rationalize time spent away from my family when I was at a healthy weight. Being overweight and needing to improve my health was something I could use but once I felt like I was losing for vanity, I felt guilty exercising. But, you're right, Melissa, I forgot that I feel better when I exercise and when I feel better, so do they. I really need to let this soak in. My mother used to always say, "When Momma's not happy, no one is happy!" Sigh...she was right on that account, too. :lol:

Desiderata
01-15-2013, 01:28 PM
I've learned that the only way to avoid repeating mistakes is to really learn from what's gone wrong. That sounds trite, I know. But it's been very instructive to look back at prior weight loss attempts and pinpoint what was happening in my life and what choices I was making when I went off-track and started regaining. I know that those external factors - or something else - are likely to rear their head at some point, but now I have some strategies to encourage me to react differently next time. Triggers and life situations are such individualized things - as are their solutions! - but the process of really closely examining yourself is something I'd recommend to everyone.

Elladorine
01-15-2013, 02:01 PM
What I learned is that there is no end point. Previous weight loss attempts always had a finish line. "I'm thin, I win, let's have pizza to celebrate!"

I've been at goal for several years now, and it's only because I monitor my food intake, exercise, and weight as consistently now as I did when I was trying to lose it.
I've never been anywhere near goal (in fact I'm closing in on my lowest weight ever), but this is something I plan on doing for life. I don't think I'll ever be able to "relax," as this is basically a disease that must be managed. I've long accepted the fact that I'll always have to monitor my food, exercise, and weight no matter what point I'm at in my life.

berryblondeboys
01-15-2013, 02:10 PM
I've learned that the only way to avoid repeating mistakes is to really learn from what's gone wrong. That sounds trite, I know. But it's been very instructive to look back at prior weight loss attempts and pinpoint what was happening in my life and what choices I was making when I went off-track and started regaining. I know that those external factors - or something else - are likely to rear their head at some point, but now I have some strategies to encourage me to react differently next time. Triggers and life situations are such individualized things - as are their solutions! - but the process of really closely examining yourself is something I'd recommend to everyone.

Yep, even with my most recent stumble, I've learned from it - and it's easier and easier to get back on track and not to let myself get too far off track when I do stumble. We need to constantly learn from this journey to make it easier and easier to live it.

LandonsBaby
01-15-2013, 04:53 PM
Extremes don't work.

Very true. They may work for a while but in the long run they are disastrous.

I've learned I just need to be consistent and that I'm going to have to make a lot of effort on the part of my other health issues in order to get anywhere.

freelancemomma
01-15-2013, 04:54 PM
I am not a better, smarter person just because I lost a lot of weight. I am not a worse, dumber person just because I regained the weight.

Rated up!

F.