Carb Counters - Is there a Wheat Belly Diet thread ?




Nora52
12-20-2012, 10:33 PM
I am not sure if there is a thread on Wheat Belly Diet here ? I have been on this diet since Sept and really like it.. Anyone else ?


kaplods
12-20-2012, 10:51 PM
The Paleo and Primal diets are very comparable and compatible with the Wheat Belly diet (there are far more similarities than differences), so if you don't find a Wheat Belly diet thread, or if you want more support from people on essentially the same food plan, you can check out the Primal/Paleo threads as well.

My main plan is a paleo-based exchange plan, though I use "The Simple Diet" as well when cooking/food-prep is going to be a challenge.

Nora52
12-20-2012, 10:56 PM
I have looked at Paleo diets before but they vary quite a bit to WB and what I am doing... Honey allowed for instance on Paleo, and no dairy allowed either?... ( I love my dairy! ). Just hoping someone else is out there...


kaplods
12-21-2012, 12:28 AM
I have looked at Paleo diets before but they vary quite a bit to WB and what I am doing... Honey allowed for instance on Paleo, and no dairy allowed either?... ( I love my dairy! ). Just hoping someone else is out there...


Not all Paleo diets allow or encourage honey, and not all ban dairy (or consider all dairy either.

There are a few "gray area" foods in paleo that some paleo plans discourage, honey (and even fruit in large quantities), dairy, potatoes and sweet potatoes (some allow sweet potatoes and others discourage both), and legumes (some ban all, some allow only those in which the pod is eaten along with the bean, and others forbid all foods that can't be eaten raw which would include legumes, potatoes, cashews, cocoa, coffee, peanuts...).

Personally, I don't eat honey, agave syrup or maple syrup. I eat fresh fruit, but watch my portions, and I'm super careful with dried fruit (I'll use them in recipes, but eating them out of hand as a snack, doesn't work for me).

I do eat cultured dairy, but try to avoid fresh (I'm mildly lactose intolerant, but don't have a problem with cultured dairy). When I first read paleo diet books in the late 70's and early 80's, One (Neanderthin I think, or possibly the Paleolithic Prescription), advocated eating low-fat dairy (when not lactose-intolerant) unless you want to eat bugs and bones (the paleo source for minerals like calcium).

If you can find Wheat Belly diet pals, that's great, but you may consider paleo as a "backup" in the sense that you'll find a lot more paleo cookbooks and other resources than wheat belly specific resources.

In the paleo cookbooks, there'll be some recipes that you won't be able to use, or will have to modify - but that's true for full-paleo folks too, because of all the slight variations in paleo plans.

Nora52
12-21-2012, 12:53 AM
I am lactose intolerant but simply use lactose free milk. WB encourages full cream or full fat dairy for eg. which helps stop the hunger. Very little fruit. So its a bit more Atkins in that respect but with the freedom of baking. I did Atkins once but WB suits me more. Hmm... Paleo sounds sort of complicated ? I am hoping some WBers chip in as I am so comfortable with that plan now. Thanks for your help :-)

kaplods
12-21-2012, 01:22 AM
The basis of paleo isn't really any more complicated than Wheat Belly.

Some paleo plans are higher in fat than others, but the boiled-down version of all the plans is essentially, Avoid grains, limit carbs (most especially sugar), increase omega 3 fats, and avoid processed foods.

I've been collecting cookbooks, especially diet cookbooks for years, and a lot of them are all marked up with notes in the margins or post-it notes, as to which recipes are compatible with which diets.

It was really the cookbooks that convinced me how compatible the low-carb, paleo, and anti-grain/gluten diets were with one another, because I found that most of the recipes were either useable or easily adapted from one plan to another.

Good luck in finding Wheat Belly followers, but if you don't, I think you'll find that you'll have about 95% in common with the paleo (and the Atkins and other low-carbers for that matter), and the 5% difference won't come up that often.

Nora52
12-22-2012, 05:54 AM
As long as it allows wine and dark chocolate ! :D I guess WB seems so easy as its so streamlined. I am confused by the different threads of Paleo.. At this stage I am waiting for the WB cookbook to come out but so far - I don't even feel like baked goods. A handful of nuts keeps me going for hours :) I do have one of the Almond Flour baking recipes of Elana's which I keep on standby in the freezer... but hardly need that now :)

Nora52
12-24-2012, 05:18 AM
My Wheat Belly Cookbook has just shipped ! So excited !!!:)

wendyland
12-26-2012, 06:28 PM
I just looked up the wheat belly diet and it looks exactly like paleo except it includes dairy. The primal diet by mark Sisson also allows dairy if you can tolerate as well as wine and dark chocolate. Looks like a good diet but I don't think there will be many people specifically on this diet, since the paleo community is so large. It's easier to search for paleo recipes since there are so many out there. They should all be compliant with your diet.

http://blog.foodnetwork.com/healthyeats/2012/10/26/diet-101-wheat-belly-diet/

Nora52
12-27-2012, 01:20 AM
I have been searching the paleo and primal diets but they don't seem like Wheat Belly and seem much more complicated.They also include honey or maple syrup. I had some sugar for Christmas and have had terrible hunger ever since. It really spiked my Blood Sugar and took me out of ketosis. Wheat Belly is all about controlling the blood sugar ( and triglycerides etc ) by low carb, wheat/grain free and low sugar ( sweeteners). And lots of dairy.And there seems more variety and easier meals. There is a big community over at FaceBook but I just wondered if anyone was here.. :-)

maryshady
12-28-2012, 10:15 AM
I am in the process of reading wheat belly and am excited to get started. Have done atkins in the past and love the flexibility of wheat belly. We could start a thread together if you would like. I am starting today to eliminate wheat from diet but plan to go full force on Jan 1st (should be done book by then and gotten my house cleaned out of the holiday junk).

Nora52
12-28-2012, 03:06 PM
Hi Mary, That is a great idea. I would love to have a weight loss buddy . I need to lose more... I would say at least another 30 pounds. I have done Atkins before and Wheat Belly is much easier. You will love it! I have no hunger at all . I keep meaning to try the lovely WB bread recipes but I do not even need them.. It is amazing how just a tiny amount of wheat can ruin and cause so many problems. I ordered the WB Cookbook and another one which follows the same plan.. Satisfying Eats. I hope you find the WB book interesting. I know I did and it all made sense to me...why all my previous dieting had either failed or been difficult to maintain.

maryshady
12-29-2012, 09:24 AM
Sounds great. I would like to lose about 20 lbs. Have you cut all sugars out of your diet too. I usually have one cup of tea a day (when I go to work) with 1 tsp of sugar. Just can't stand the taste of artificial sweeteners in tea. Will try a week still using that 1 tsp and see how it goes. If my cravings persist I will cut it out. Almost done the book already. Skipped to the getting started part cause the technical stuff was too much for one day. I just couldn't comprehend anymore! lol! So have about 4 more chapters of the technical stuff to go and will be done. Already convinced at how horrible it is for the human body.

Quick question. He says to avoid things like oatmeal or bananas but then uses them in a few of the recipes in the book. Are you suppose to use them in very limited quantities if you want or only use them once you reach goal?

Nora52
12-29-2012, 05:21 PM
I still use a little sugar and I am still losing weight.. but I take metformin so that may control my Insulin levels more than yours. Ideally there should be low sugar <15grams carbs per meal to lose weight but YMMV. You can only try it and see. Can you switch to a "sweeter' herbal type tea? I always have my coffee and tea without any sugar at all. The tea I like is Twinings Lady Grey which is slightly flavoured with orange and lemon peel. I use Elana'a Almond Flour cookbook and use sugar in half quantity ( instead of agave syrup) and have one of the choc chip cookies a day and I still lose weight.. I worked out there would be a teaspoon of sugar per cookie. But I have ordered Satisfying Eats cookbook ( she lost 60 pounds on WB ) and her recipes are all sweeteners... but she recommends only one brand of Stevia... I have not tried any of those recipes yet. I am waiting on the WB CookBook to arrive. It is getting awesome feedback already. When you finish the WB book - go back and reread it. It has so much info that it takes all of us 2 reads to absorb it all :-) I made a few mistakes to start but am on track now. When you eat WB you soon feel the difference when you are not on track...

kaplods
12-29-2012, 06:02 PM
I have been searching the paleo and primal diets but they don't seem like Wheat Belly and seem much more complicated.They also include honey or maple syrup.

Judging paleo for it's acceptance of honey, is a bit like judging Ideal Protein for allowing fresh dairy (even though, if I'm remembering correctly, only 1 tablespoon of dairy is allowed daily).

Yes it's allowed, but it's supposed to be a teeny, tiny, and entirely optional part of the diet. You do not have to eat honey or maple syrup on a paleo diet, and most paleo dieters don't use any at all or use it exceedingly sparingly (especially if they've read the most reputable paleo books which explain that higher-carb paleo foods really are only appropriate in extremely limited quantities and should be avoided by people who are not young, fit, healthy, and thin. And even those who are young, fit, healthy, and thin should be very careful not to overindulge in these foods).


Wheat Belly is not only similar to paleo diets, it IS A PALEO DIET. Although the author never uses the words to describe his diet, all the research he cites and all the logic he uses, is the same information that is used to support the paleo diets. His arguments are all paleo-based - that is that modern foods aren't like ancient foods, and that we need to live a more "primitive," whole-food lifestyle, with more foods that our ancient ancestors would recognize (which in most cases means foods with fewer carbs and more fiber).


There are many paleo diets, just as there are many low-carb diets. This means some are more complicated and restrictive than others.

It is also absolutely not true that all paleo diets include honey or maple syrup (most do not); and even those that do allow it, only advocate they be used in very, very small amounts, infrequently.

Paleo humans didn't have honey every day, or even every month, even when and where it was available. It was a very rare and special treat, and the average person might get a finger full every now and then.

Most modern paleo diets suggest that for weight loss, all high-carb foods (even the paleo ones) be avoided or carefully monitored, if not limited (and I'll list the questionable foods at the end of the post).

Many people don't get this if they don't read the paleo books carefully, or if they read books that are "rule-oriented" rather than information oriented, but the essence of basis of paleo is quite easy - and identical to that of Wheat Belly (which is why Wheat Belly is a paleo diet - it's just not the only paleo diet).

The part that all paleo diets agree on is very, very simple - Blood sugar control through a diet that contains foods that humans have been eating the longest. And in all paleo diets, 80 to 90% of the diet is to be based on eating primarily non-starchy, non-sugary plants, no "true grains," limited pseudo-grains, and "good" non-altered fats and protein sources (ideally from grass-fed sources, and if you can't afford or find mostly grass-fed sources, supplement with an omega-3 supplement such as flax seed and/or fish oil).

The 10 to 20 percent that paleo diets disagree on tend to be foods that never have to be eaten at all, and should never make up a large part of your diet (and you can avoid all of them without negative effects), especially if you're not already thin, fit, young, and healthy.

The "questionable" foods (that some plans allow, mostly in very small quantities and not usually for weight loss phases) include tea, chocolate, coffee (because of the caffeine and other stimulants in them), starchy tubers and root vegetables (beets, carrots, sweet potatoes, rutabega... and white potatoes are usually discouraged all-together), most fruit (except citrus and berries), dairy (when it's allowed, most often when it is, cultured and aged dairy like yogurt and cheese is preferred over fresh dairy), alcohol (especially distilled alcohol), eggs (because they're a common allergen, some dietary anthropologists believe that eggs were not a part of the early human diet - because most allergens are modern foods), as well as legumes, and cashews (and other foods that cannot be eaten raw).

It sounds like a long and complicated list, but it really isn't because as long as they're (in combination) only taking up a very small part of your diet, you're probably good to go, and can include them in very small amounts. They all mostly fall into two categories that are easy to avoid

1. Calorie-dense foods that are usually also high-carb.

2. Foods that are inedible raw, or require complicated processing to make edible.


The great thing about understanding the similarities and differences between Wheat Belly and other common paleo diets is that once you understand the theory, you can tweak it to your own needs, and you can use cookbooks interchangeably.

I've found that on a primarily paleo diet, I can use just about all Atkins recipes and about 80-90% of all other plans that are based on blood-sugar control.

This includes the Insulin-resistance diets, many diabetic diets (some diabetic diets are too high-carb), the paleo and low-carb diets (including Wheat Belly), many of the diets designed generically for autoimmune disease as well as specific autoimmune diseases (such as diets for those who are hypothyroid).

Nora52
12-29-2012, 06:17 PM
I prefer Wheat Belly Diet by a long way!! :-) Confirmed by the huge list of above.. :-) They are similar but WB feels a much easier place to be! I really like it. No limits on coffee for starters LOL

kaplods
12-29-2012, 06:51 PM
If you prefer a simplified paleo diet that's fine, but it is a paleo diet, regardless. If you're going to criticise paleo diets, you should know whether or not your criticisms are valid of all or even most paleo diets and they're not.

Personally I don't find the ten to fifteen foods I listed such a huge list, especially since I eat most of them in small amounts that fit into most paleo guidelines.

Most paleo diets do not limit coffee, but a few do - mostly those who aren't judging paleo by its effects on the body but by the actual foods paleo people ate. That's not particularly helpful, because truly paleo foods aren't available or palatable to modern folks (Insects make up a HUGE part of most paleo diets, and most Americans would rather not get most of their protein from insects).

The paleo diets based on blood sugar control have a more lenient view of low-carb, low-calorie, non-inflammatory modern foods, and they also limit or avoid "paleo-available" foods that were high in carb (but also exceedingly rare) such as honey and maple syrup.

Wheat Belly is virtually identical to all the other paleo diets that focus primarily on blood sugar and inflammation controled.

In addition, most paleo diets do not require a 100% paleo-available diet. Instead they advocate your diet contain 80 to 90% of foods as paleo as posible, and that modern non-paleo foods be chosen judiciously. Of the non-paleo foods you choose to eat, you choose mostly lower-calorie, lower-carb options (because the main goal is blood sugar control and non-inflammatory foods).

You can choose to follow or create a simple paleo diet like Wheat Belly or even one simpler. Or you can understand the reasons paleo diets work, and while that's more complicated in the short-term, it's also much easier in the long-run, because then you can judge every food, including non-paleo foods according to their likely impact on blood sugar and inflammation.

This is why I personally do include caffeinated non-calorie beverages, including tea (not coffee so much as I've never been a coffee fan). It's also why I include some artificial sweeteners, because they're not known to be inflammatory in small quantities and because they do not affect my blood sugar (some people report different effects, so for diabetics and others with blood sugar issues they might want to consider blood sugar monitoring if they suspect blood sugar effects). And it's why I include fermented dairy. I've learned to recognize an inflammatory response - and I do have a negative reaction to fresh dairy, but not to aged/cultured dairy (which I'm assuming is due to a mild lactose-intolerance).


Wheat Belly is a great paleo diet, but it isn't significantly different from other blood-sugar regulating paleo diets (which are most of them). If it's simpler format works well for you, that's great - but you're going to be eating pretty much identically to most other paleo dieters. And that's actually the beauty of all the paleo diets. 90% of the diet is going to be very similar from one plan to another, and the differences are going to be significant only for a few people who are sensitive to those foods.

In the short-run, I think the simplest plans have an advantage. You don't have to understand why it works, you just have to know that it does.

However, their limitations lie in the fact that you can't apply the knowledge to foods that you don't know how to classify. When you understand WHY paleo diets work, you don't need a list of foods you can and can't have, because you can judge each food by its similarity to other foods. You can have a bit of honey or sweet potato or even real sugar as long as you know it can't make up a regular or significant part of the diet.

If you don't understand the blood sugar and inflammation aspects of foods, then you need a list of allowed and forbidden foods. Unfortunately most foods don't really fall well into such black and white "eat all you want" or a "never eat" categories.

Nora52
12-29-2012, 07:45 PM
Wheat Belly is not Paleo. Sorry.

kaplods
12-30-2012, 02:43 AM
Wheat Belly is not Paleo. Sorry.


Uh, yeah it is. In fact, Dr. Davis himself refers to his diet recommendations as Paleo in his interview with Robb Wolf in The Paleo Solution – Episode 95). Not just once, but several times. And in fact, he said at least once "your listeners probably already know this," or something to that effect.

You can read and hear it yourself on this website.

http://robbwolf.com/2011/08/30/the-paleo-solution-episode-95/


On page 2, Dr. Davis refers to his experiments with a "Paleo-type diet."

And on page 18, Robb Wolf praises Dr. Davis for his paleo-foucs and for Dr. Davis describing a paleo eating style, without actually using the word "paleo" in order to draw a more mainstream crowd and one that would be put off by the word paleo.

Dr. Davis doesn't say "Woa now, don't misunderstand and think I'm advocating a paleo diet and just calling it something else." If he didn't see his diet as paleo, wouldn't you think he would have corrected Wolf? Also when Dr. Davis describes his daughter following his wheat-free recommendations he talks about his tennis pro daughter's experience with a "paleo diet" or a "paleo-type diet" clearly meaning the type of diet he himself is recommending.


Never does Dr. Davis stress how (or even whether) his diet is any DIFFERENT than paleo - but rather he clearly presents his ideas as not just compatible with, but identical to paleo.

You would think that if Dr. Davis was opposed to the idea that his diet is a paleo diet, he would have never used the words paleo himself to describe the diets he was researching and recommending (but he DOES describe the diet as paleo - several times). But Dr. Davis never does that. Not only does he use the paleo label to describe his findings and recommendations - he also doesn't dispute. argue with, or correct Wolf when he refers to them as paleo. Surely if Dr. Davis didn't consider his recommendations paleo he would have done so.

As I listened to the interview and read the transcript, I did not hear Dr. Davis or Robb Wolf disagree on any points. If Dr. Davis did not consider his diet a paleo diet, he wouldn't have used the word himself without clarification. Surely if he felt there were important differences between his diet and the Paleo diets, he would have argued them (or at least mentioned them) in this interview.

kaplods
12-30-2012, 02:58 AM
Here's another paleo site in which Wheat Belly is described, and the commentors are clearly agreeing that the book's arguments are nothing new to the paleo community. The description of what Dr. Davis recommends eating is virtually identical to what I've gleaned from reading a dozen or so paleo books. If you read all the paleo diets, you're left with pretty much the same list, with only a few exceptions overall. Dr. Davis is a bit more lenient on some foods, but these are also all foods that some paleo diets allow. None of his "forbidden foods" are foods that all paleo diets accept (and even those that do allow those foods, the recommendation is to eat them very, very sparingly - or to experiment to see if those foods cause you any problems).

Sure if you read only one or even four or five paleo books, you can walk away thinking there's a "huge difference" between Wheat Belly and paleo - but when even Dr. Davis himself describes the diets he has studied and recommends as "Paleo" or "Paleo-style" I would argue that says it all. If he can describe the diet as Paleo-style, I think it's fair for me to.



http://paleohacks.com/questions/70553/thoughts-on-the-wheat-belly-diet#axzz2GVqVul4J

Desiderata
12-30-2012, 05:25 AM
Getting caught up in diet dogma has never been helpful to me. In the past, I've excluded even considering other plans because they weren't MY plan -- to my detriment, as I was overlooking something useful for me. (I used to eschew Atkins and was dismissive of the whole low carb thing. Yet now that I am paleo/primal and wheat-free, I have a renewed appreciation for Atkins and have borrowed certain elements to great reward.)

My advice would be not to get too hung up on labels. When there's so much overlap, you can only benefit by being open and listening to what your own body tells you as you experiment with different eating choices. I'm glad you've found something helpful in the Wheat Belly book! I've never read it, but eliminating wheat has been very helpful for me. Paleo has been as well - but again, I've found it most helpful when I take inspiration from it instead of following it dogmatically, and instead use my body as the final arbiter for how well I tolerate things. (Wheat's out, but caffeine and dairy are in, I'm happy to say!)

Good luck to you!

beachbella85
12-30-2012, 10:24 AM
...also, i don't think we have to get caught up in labels...if you've found something that is successful for you...even if you modify it a bit to make yourself happy then HOORAY! and we are all supportive of any safe modes of success...

Tell me more about Wheat Belly! I've been dabbling in wheat free for since July. I went hardcore for a couple of months but got off track, but I'd really like to get back to that place because I miss it. I didn't consider going completely on their diet plan though...maybe I'll do a bit more research into it. I just cut the wheat out and felt the wonders :)...even if it is a drag since I can't have publix sandwiches...but I don't really miss the rest of the stuff...every now and then I would 'treat' myself to something but then I'd buy it and take one bite and decide I didn't like that crap anymore. Going wheat free was the most liberating experience of my life and for the first time, I had self control over my diet and how and what I chose to eat....mmm, think I'm going to get back to that place :)....

beachbella85
12-30-2012, 10:26 AM
O and I'd be down for a Wheat Belly thread as well...I'll probably just lurk for a few weeks but I'm really a huge advocate for going wheat free, even if only temporarily just to break the addictive chains of sugar+wheat combination...

kaplods
12-30-2012, 01:23 PM
Getting caught up in diet dogma has never been helpful to me. In the past, I've excluded even considering other plans because they weren't MY plan -- to my detriment, as I was overlooking something useful for me. (I used to eschew Atkins and was dismissive of the whole low carb thing. Yet now that I am paleo/primal and wheat-free, I have a renewed appreciation for Atkins and have borrowed certain elements to great reward.)

My advice would be not to get too hung up on labels. When there's so much overlap, you can only benefit by being open and listening to what your own body tells you as you experiment with different eating choices. I'm glad you've found something helpful in the Wheat Belly book! I've never read it, but eliminating wheat has been very helpful for me. Paleo has been as well - but again, I've found it most helpful when I take inspiration from it instead of following it dogmatically, and instead use my body as the final arbiter for how well I tolerate things. (Wheat's out, but caffeine and dairy are in, I'm happy to say!)

Good luck to you!


This is what I've been trying to say. It isn't about the label, it's about the way of eating, and paleo and wheat belly are so similar that it makes sense to come together in the same thread, because there may not be enough of us to support individual threads.

Dieting in our culture is very much like religion - more divisionary than inclusive - even when the beliefs and religious services are nearly identical, to the point that a casual observer wouldn't catch the differences.

I lived in a town where even the Catholic churces were so divided that there was true animosity between the polish, italian, and slovac churches. The parishes wouldn't cooperate or accept help from one of the other churches, even if it was offered. One church school oferred to share it's computer lab with a poorer school, and the school board refused. Why? Because the school with the computer lab had school uniforms and allowed the girls to wear slacks to school (the smaller school had no uniforms, but an incredibly complicated dress code including past-the-knee dresses for girls).

I've seen the same thing in dieting over and over. People living and eating almost identically, but refusing to be a support for the other, because of one tiny difference in philosophy - even if it doesn't apply to them.

What? You won't consider my plan because it includes coffee, but you don't drink coffee?

Doesn't matter, the plan just isn't the same, because there's a single difference.

The pseudo-religious dogma is incredibly frustrating, and it kept me fat for decades. Oh, it wasn't the only reason, but it was a very big contributor - because if a plan didn't work for me, even for a tiny reason I could easily adapt to, instead I ditched the plan and went looking for something else.

I finally learned the lesson when I started South Beach maybe ten years or so ago. I loved sweet corn, watermelon, and fresh pineapple, and I thought the diet was insane for considering them foods to avoid or eat rarely. I never had a problem with any of those. In fact, every summer I lost weight on my "sweet corn and watermelon diet." I would eat as much sweet corn and watermelon I wanted, along with some protein (maybe from a rotisserie chicken or something easy). It was only a few days, but I wasn't willing to give up those foods.

I almost ditched South Beach entirely, and then I realized I only eat sweet corn and watermelon in late July and August for a few weeks. And pineapple I eat 3 per year at most. I was going to ditch something because I quibbled over something such a small part of my diet.

The thing is, I couldn't admit to eating sweet corn, watermelon, or pineapple when talking to folks on South Beach (either here or IRL), because they'd say "if you're eating that, you're no on South Beach." Even though these weren't foods that Dr. Agatson banned in his book, they were just labeled "limited," or "eat rarely." In fact, Dr. Agatson never outright banns anything. The food people translate as "forbiden" he uses the term "eat rarely" (or something to the effect, it's been a while since I read the book).

It frustrates me when I see people eating almost identically, who focus on the differences instead of the similarities, because there are zillions of diets out there (and zillions more if you count all the inventions and adaptations people make on their own). And yet, everyone seems to want a thread with people following the exact, same, not-just-nearly-identical, but exactly-identical-not-just-in-practice-but-in-every-minute-detail.

It means that someone following Wheat Belly as written, but puts a tsp of honey in their tea is considered "cheating" or "not really following the diet."

I know I'm ranting a bit here, but I just see all the lost potential in people not coming together because of a few minor differences, when they have 95% of their plan in common. Refusing to see the common threads means everyone has less support available than they could.

Wheat Belly is new, and a there aren't a lot of followers yet. An individual thread is great, but you may have little or no company until it gains momentum. Even then, many people knowing it's history, may be responding in the paleo threads, because they were following paleo first and have read Wheat Belly but don't see differences distinct enough to "convert" and have simply integrated Wheat Belly's information into what they already have.

I understand the desire to say "Wheat Belly isn't paleo, it's something new entirely," because people like following new and unique plans (so if they're not unique, they find some minor element to prove a difference).

I think it's pretty clear from the transcript I referenced, that Dr. Davis considers his diet paleo. Now, that doesn't mean anyone has to use the label. Wolf praises Dr. Davis for not using the label, so that it will appeal to the mainstream - who have already rejected or will reject the term. And that's kind of sad. He's essentially thanking Dr. Davis for disguising paleo so it's palatable to the masses. Wouldn't it be great if it didn't have to be disguiesed?

The label is meaningless (which was really my point). However, if Dr. Davis himself embraces paleo, it seems a bit strange to exclude the folks Dr. Davis himself includes.

I know the paleo thread would embrace anyone following Wheat Belly. No one who understands paleo will say, "that's not paleo." And I think a Wheat Belly thread should do the same. Embrace any paleo folk who stop by - because odds are you're eating pretty much the same, for pretty much the same reason.

I tend to rant a bit on this subject, because I see far too many people excluding each other and refusing support from people who are "a little different" even when the difference is 1% of the total. None of us are on 100% the same plan. Everyone will be interpreting their plan and eating just a little bit differently. We can focus on the differences or we can focus on the similarities.

I think the way that offers the most support is focusing on the similarities - so I'm going to point out the similarities when I see them (sometimes to the point of being a bit of a nuisance). I'm sorry for the nuisance to anyone, but I feel it's so important I can't keep silent when I see people creating divisions that don't need to exist. I'm not saying they don't have a right to create that division if they want it, but I also think the similarities are far more important than the differences. After all, how much are the differences really going to come up? Are we really going to spend that much time discussing whether or not we had a teaspoon of honey once a week or whether dairy is something a person should or shouldn't eat?

For the most part, the paleo threads don't get into those arguments. No one is sent away or criticised because they choose to include/exclude a bit of dairy or honey.

None of these plans is about perfection, it's about eating less man-made food and more food that our ancient ancestors would recognize as food - and eliminating the foods that our great grandparents might not recognize.

I just think that an inclusionary thread would be more supportive, than focusing on minute differences.

Dali234
01-01-2013, 06:18 PM
Been away for a while. I read Wheat Belly recently, and have been reading paleo blogs for a year or so. I am not "hard-core" paleo, because I eat dairy, but I am trying to be pretty much low carb, high protein, vegetables and dairy, and in almost every case, eating foods the way they are made eg: whole milk, grass fed beef, etc. No additives, no fake sweeteners, etc.
Don't know where this fits, but would love to have some company in the coming months.

Nora52
01-01-2013, 08:00 PM
Dali, Wheat Belly may suit you... I don't know.. YMMV. It does encourage fake sweeteners though - but you can use Stevia.. The reasons for sweeteners is explained by the WB book. The aim is to keep the Blood Sugar level and an after meal reading below 100.. So honey in tea for eg - would spike that reading. And may also affect the heart lipid profile for up to 10 days. And Wheat Belly also discourages some vegetables that also spike Blood Sugar. WB is for health not just weight loss. We can stay on track cos we feel so well. WB is growing so fast. But it is new... so there will be false stories and misconceptions. I really like it. Hubbie too. It just feels like regular food without the wheat :-)

Sparkygrrl
01-01-2013, 08:39 PM
I've been following WB for about five months and love it. I have lost weight but more importantly got rid of most of my headaches. Just wondering how the cookbook is? I tried a few of the recipes at the back of his original book and wasn't overly thrilled. I don't bother with buying GF bread and if I really want something I will make a one minute muffin with flaxseed. I too wish there was a WB thread on here and was quite surprised to find out there wasn't.

froggydawgy
01-01-2013, 11:00 PM
Wheat Belly Thread started here
3 Fat Chicks on a Diet Weight Loss Community > Diet Central > Carb Counters
Wheat Belly-January Wheat Belly-January

Nora52
01-01-2013, 11:20 PM
That is great... I have only been seriously on WB since Sept although was tending to eat less carbs before that. I must mention the GF bread though - that is really bad for us. We have to stay off commercial GF replacement type foods that have riceflour, tapioca flour, potato flour etc. I did try one MIM but like you - wasn't that impressed and have been happy to just potter along without much baking. I am waiting for the CookBook. Pizza is high on the list !

I had some sugar over Christmas and have been battling the sugar ever since... It takes ages to clear the system ! I lost my knee pain which was great news for me.. Glad your headaches are much better.


I've been following WB for about five months and love it. I have lost weight but more importantly got rid of most of my headaches. Just wondering how the cookbook is? I tried a few of the recipes at the back of his original book and wasn't overly thrilled. I don't bother with buying GF bread and if I really want something I will make a one minute muffin with flaxseed. I too wish there was a WB thread on here and was quite surprised to find out there wasn't.