General Diet Plans and Questions - The Healthy Way Diet




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SophieCormier
11-29-2012, 11:15 AM
I've stumbled on a video on youtube and then it linked me to this website here: http://www.thehealthywaydiet.com/video-page/
I was looking for a contact email and found this website: http://www.thehealthywaydiet.com/

I guess it's an easy-to-follow diet. You get a lot of ebooks to help you discover which foods are good and which are bad for your body type. It got me really interested but the price is $47 for everything. You get the ebooks, I think a website or program to track your stuff, you get free support from the owner. I went looking for reviews on Google and all the reviews seem good. I didn't find any bad ones out there. It has a 60 day money back guarantee if it doesn't work for you.

The only thing is I don't really know what it's going to be like. I'm one of these people who can't follow a strict meal plan already generated for you. It can only work for me if there's a list of foods I can and can't eat and I can make a menu from those foods. I sent them an email about this. I also asked if, after a week, that's if it's not for me, if I can get my money back. I emailed them yesterday so still waiting for a reply.

I wanted to check if someone ever tried this before on here. I'm ON THE VERGE of buying it but I'm scared. There's also the fact that it's RIGHT before holidays and I'm scared of not being able to follow it during those times but I really want to lose weight before then.

The payment method they use is click bank & paypal which is really excellent IMO!


StephanieM
11-29-2012, 11:21 AM
I just did some searching and I can't find a legit review on this diet. I just find reviews on the type of sites that the owners of the diet set up themselves to put fake good reviews out there, or the type of sites where someone is paid to give a good review.

There's so little information, I don't know if it's anything special. It obviouslly hasn't been around long either since there are no real reviews.

SophieCormier
11-29-2012, 11:27 AM
^ That's what I figured, that it hasn't been out long... Hmmm. I guess I'll wait and see what they email me. Thanks Stephanie!


bargoo
11-29-2012, 11:53 AM
Sophie, yu can get all , or most, of that information right here at 3FC and it won't cost you a cent.

SophieCormier
11-29-2012, 11:59 AM
Thanks Bargoo, but I'm one of those who need a guidelines to follow if I want to lose weight. I've tried many diets in my life and I'm in a rut. My clothes no longer fit me and it's really putting me down. Just by myself, I gain...

SophieCormier
11-29-2012, 12:23 PM
Yes, I get that from the program. Which is why I want to buy it lol.

SophieCormier
12-03-2012, 09:22 AM
They didn't email me back yet so I guess I won't be buying it if I don't know what I'm paying for. I guess it's going to be Plan B for me.

kaplods
12-03-2012, 03:35 PM
Thanks Bargoo, but I'm one of those who need a guidelines to follow if I want to lose weight. I've tried many diets in my life and I'm in a rut. My clothes no longer fit me and it's really putting me down. Just by myself, I gain...


There's ten gazillion food plans you can follow, AND you can even create your own to make it ten gazillion and one (or two and three and four because you can KEEP creatting guidelines for yourself to follow).

You can try or create a different plan each and every day if you want.

I also used to get bored very easily, and thought I needed guidelines created by someone else in order to lose weight.

I was dead wrong. I had the power within me to create my own guidelines and follow them for as long as they were comfortable - then I'd find or create another set of guidelines.

It is a myth that you have to find or create a plan that you can stick to forever, you just need to be willing to stick to some type of plan forever - and the plan can even be a different one each and every day.

I can't even tell you how many plans I've been on during this journey of 105 lbs. I have too many "not-quite on plan days" to brag about my rate of loss, but what I CAN brag about is "not gaining." It's been about 8 years since I've had a serious bout of gaining. Oh sure, there's been TOM/PMS weight gain, and there's been the occasional Monday gain after an indulgent weekend - but no gain serious enough for me to see it as backsliding. To have 8 years free of bingeing and serious weight yoyoing, it's a freedom I never take for granted.

So pick a plan, any plan - or create your own. Even make it silly if you want (just don't stick with a silly plan. One day of eating nothing but bananas probably won't kill you, but I wouldn't recommend it for the long haul - and it might do some crazy things to your toileting habits).

I do best on a low-carb (but not too low) paleo, but winters are really rough on me. I have fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis, and autoimmune issues that even during the best time of year can periodically cause severe pain and fatigue and the more pain and fatigue, the more brain fog (my IQ drops exponentially with the pain and fatigue). Winter is my worst time of year (well technically season change is even worse, once it gets cold and stays cold I feel better than when it's constantly up and down. So Nov/Dec and Feb/March are my worst times of year, mostly).

That may sound like a lot of unnecessary garbage about me - but the reason I say this is that I find that during my bad months, I need a plan that's super simple - not just easy to remember and stick to - but also easy to execute, with a minimum of shopping and food preparation (because hubby while willing to "take care of me" during most of the year, has his own health, pain and mobility issues that also peak this time of year). We're essentially useless human beings for a few months.

So I chose the Simple Diet (there's a thread here on 3FC that outlines the plan). It's so simple that you can start the diet before reading the book - though I would recommend the book, because it's filled with a lot more information on both the diet and transitioning to more real food later in the diet.

There's a thread here on 3FC on the plan (I believe the plan itself is explained in the first few posts).

http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/general-diet-plans-questions/252102-dr-andersons-simple-diet.html


It's essentially 3 meal replacements (shakes mostly) and 2 frozen dinners, and 5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables.


I'm not saying this is the plan (or even a plan) for you, it's just one of the ten gazillion.

It's not even the "best" of the ten gazillion. It's just the one I'm choosing to follow during this time of year, when I don't have the energy for more food prep.

Even so, I do make some tweaks to this plan to make it my own, because I'm one of those people that refuses to follow rules that don't make sense ot me - so I have to bend the rules to fit my own personal beliefs.

For example, when I followed South Beach, I found it absolutely ridiculous that watermelon, pineapple, and sweet corn were foods to be avoided. So I didn't avoid them. Sweet corn probably was the most iffy, but I wasn't going to give up sweet corn during sweet corn season. In fact every July I go on what I call the "sweet corn and watermelon diet." It's only for a couple weeks, but I eat unlimited sweet corn, watermelon, and lean meat. And I always lose a lot of weight, so when I followed South Beach I didn't let it interupt my July sweet corn and watermelon binge-fest (and what a joyous binge - because not many binges in life cause weight loss). I did have some bathroom issues because of IBS, but hey there's always negative consequences, even to the greatest of choices. Ever decision is a tradeoff.

I lost quite a bit of weight on South Beach even when I ate as much sweet corn, watermelon, and fresh pineapple.

When I stopped losing weight, I gave up my "adaptations" (I NEVER call off-plan foods cheats, even when they're off my version of my plan). I still wasn't losing, so I tried Atkins for a while.

My long-winded point is that you don't need someone else's plan, and you don't need a long-term plan, you just need a plan for today, and there are ten gazillion choices (and even more you can make for yourself).

If you're going to make or adapt a plan, write down the guidelines. That way you've cemented them into your mind as "a plan" not a whim. I also find that if I don't have a clear plan (whether it be guidelines written by ME or someone else) then I lose focus.

So even if you're going to follow a different plan every week or every few days (I'd avoid using the different plan every day - I've done it, and while it works, it's too time consuming), write your guidelines down.

For myself, I always follow three plans (my main plan, a backup plan, and a last resort plan). For the past several months I've had the same three plans, but which plan is the main plan, and which plans are the backups changes depending on my needs (The Simple Diet was my Plan B for the last few months - the plan I used when my pain was flaring. Now the Simple DIet is the main plan).

Mine are

The Simple Diet
Paleo exchange plan
1800 calories (trying to eat lower carb, but not stressing over the carb count)


You don't have to have three plans, but you can change your plan as often as you'd like, and you CAN invent or tweak your own. Just write down the guidelines before starting - and even make it read like a contract and sign it. Commit to it for the period you decide to put in your contract.

SophieCormier
12-04-2012, 12:03 PM
Kaplods... I think I love you! LOL! Thank you so much for all that!
I tried the Simple Diet during summer but with all the partying I was doing, I couldn't stick with it. Now that it's winter though, I could have another go. I was REALLY simple diet. My favorite diets were that one & the 17 Day Diet. I think I'm going to do that! I'm going to write it all down like you suggested and make it official. My three diets are going to be: Simple Diet, 17DD & counting calories.

I think this'll be good for me though since I can usually only follow a diet for a couple of days. Maybe this'll work best for me :)

kaplods
12-04-2012, 10:14 PM
Kaplods... I think I love you! LOL! Thank you so much for all that!
I tried the Simple Diet during summer but with all the partying I was doing, I couldn't stick with it. Now that it's winter though, I could have another go. I was REALLY simple diet. My favorite diets were that one & the 17 Day Diet. I think I'm going to do that! I'm going to write it all down like you suggested and make it official. My three diets are going to be: Simple Diet, 17DD & counting calories.

I think this'll be good for me though since I can usually only follow a diet for a couple of days. Maybe this'll work best for me :)


LOL! Thanks, glad it helped. It took me more than three decades (almost four) to understand that I didn't have to let my inability to stick to a single plan hold me back. For years and years and years I followed a ritualistic tradition that I didn't even know had become ingrained. I just followed the pattern I'd seen set for me by almost everyone I ever knew with a weight problem.

kaplods
12-04-2012, 10:44 PM
Kaplods... I think I love you! LOL! Thank you so much for all that!
I tried the Simple Diet during summer but with all the partying I was doing, I couldn't stick with it. Now that it's winter though, I could have another go. I was REALLY simple diet. My favorite diets were that one & the 17 Day Diet. I think I'm going to do that! I'm going to write it all down like you suggested and make it official. My three diets are going to be: Simple Diet, 17DD & counting calories.

I think this'll be good for me though since I can usually only follow a diet for a couple of days. Maybe this'll work best for me :)


LOL! Thanks, glad it helped. It took me more than three decades (almost four) to understand that I didn't have to let my inability to stick to a single plan hold me back. For more years than I'd like to recall, I followed a ritualistic tradition that I didn't even know had become ingrained. I just followed the pattern I'd seen set for me by almost everyone I ever knew who struggled with a weight issue:

When I realized a diet plan wasn't working for me, for whatever reason (whether I stopped losing the weight, couldn't stick to it, got bored with it, hated it, or whatever), I would take a "break" from the dieting while I looked for another plan. Inevitably I would gain most, all, or more weight back while I took this break.

And even if I didn't abandon the diet, I had other "rituals" that were counterproductive. Even if I was firmly committed to, and in love with a particular plan, and had no intention of abandoning it, if I had so much as an off-plan bite, I would binge for the rest of the day (after all I'd "blown it") and would start fresh the next day (or if it was midweek or later the next Monday, or it was at the end of the month, the beginning of the next Month).

When I came here, I realized that I wasn't alone in my weird, counterproductive weight loss rituals. Our culture really has ingrained these rituals in us. There are millions of people, even those who don't have weight or eating issues any other time of the year will start bingeing around Thanksgiving (if not Halloween) and won't stop until January 1. Then they all join the gym and go religiously until Valentine's Day....

We're not "stupid" we're just social animals, and if enough of us get together and do the same stupid thing, we pass it along to the next generation of people who will follow the same stupid patterns.

I once made nurses and doctors in a hospital quite aggravated with me when I was teaching recreational therapy classes in a psych ward and substance abuse ward, and in discussing "peer pressure" I mentioned a study I had read in college that showed that there was often no "pressure" involved at all - just an example to follow.

In the experiment, the researchers had a group of people stand in an elevator facing the rear (even though it's customary to face the door). If the majority of the group faced the back of the elevator, so did every new person who got on the elevator (they might have looks of confusion on their face, but they followed the example of what was set - often even if there was only one person in the elevator facing the back wall, virtuallyl everyone who got on after that person also faced the back).

Well a group of the guys on the substance abuse ward decided to try this little experiment on their own when they went down to the cafeteria, and they were all excited to tell me the next day that "it worked" just as I had predicted. They were especially excited that not just visitors, but Doctors and Nurses had done exactly as I said - faced the back of the elevator along with them.

Now the doctors and nurses weren't happy that they were manipulated by the patients, and I think the only thing that saved me from a formal reprimand was quick thinking (and a big mouth) when I said "Hey, this is what we WANT them to learn - that peer pressure is most difficult to avoid when you don't see or feel the pressure, you just follow the example you see in front of you, because 'everyone else is doing it.'"

Most of the time you don't even realize everyone else is doing it.

Even so I had to promise not to give any of the patients any more ideas like this without talking to staff first, which I thought was silly. I didn't know that the patients were going to try the experiment, but even if I did - informing the doctors and nurses of it, would have ruined it for the patients. Either the doctors and nurses wouldn't have played along, and would have faced the front of the elevator, or they would have faced the back, but their facial expression likely would have given away the fact that they were in on the experiment - either of which wouldn't have brung home the message to the patients.

What's funny is that I've known all of these things for a very long time, but I still had (and continue to have) trouble putting them into practice - because knowing better doesn't always translate into doing better when the behaviors are so ingrained that they've almost become instinctive.

Try not to be too hard on yourself when you struggle to do a "simple" task, because sometimes the simplest are the most difficult to control. There are just so many of our behaviors that are subject to autopilot.

Don't let the "tradition" of giving up after small mistakes get in the way of your success. The American "tradition" is to fail at weight loss, so you can't do what you've always done, because it's likely what everyone else has always done, and they've done it badly because that's been the example that's been set.

If we did mountain climbing like we do weight loss, no one would survive it, because after every stumble, you'd have to throw yourself over the nearest cliff face so that you could "start fresh" from the bottom.

I can't tell you how difficult it has been to prevent myself (even now) from throwing myself off that cliff face, just because on a gut level I still feel it's the "right" thing to do. I KNOW I'm not lazy, crazy, or stupid - and yet I feel that way (and that feeling is the "traditional" trigger to the ritual of the pre-re-committment binge).

It's as if I have a permanent recording in my brain that says "you ate a single bite off-plan, well now you've blown it. You're a worthless pig. You have no self-control. You're never going to get this weight off, so you might as well not even try. And if you're never going to be thin, at least you might as well get to eat whatever you want.

Of course by morning, or by Monday, or by the first of the month, or the first of the year, the rational Colleen is back who says "give it one more go. Start over, start fresh, and really buckle down this time."

But even these thoughts are counterproductive because they all assume perfection is part of the game. Because as soon as we make the next small misstep, we throw ourselves over the cliff again.

It's all about relearning what we've NEVER been taught and UNLEARNING what we don't even realize we's been taught.

Is it any wonder that permanent weight loss (especially the more weight is involved) has such a high failure rate? We're TAUGHT to fail by all the weight loss superstitions, traditions, and rituals we've developed.