Weight Loss Support - What's your motivation?




View Full Version : What's your motivation?


thexfiles
10-12-2012, 05:22 AM
As a 25 year old you'd think I would have all the motivation in the world, but I don't, and I find that to be one of the hardest things for me and my journey. I want nothing more than to lose this weight, but every time I start my journey I end up stalling after 1 or 2 weeks! I was on the South Beach diet in grade 11 and rowing every day, so at that point I was the smallest I'd been (with the exception of elementary school, but let's be real lol). I think too negatively sometimes, which might also contribute, and maybe I'm just ultimately afraid that I'll fail again.

So I really need help with my motivation and just making time for this. I'm a student, but I know I have time to exercise more...so why DON'T I?

What are your motivations for your weight loss journey? What helps you get up off the couch and away from your fears, negative feelings, or just plain lazy moments?


freelancemomma
10-12-2012, 06:34 AM
As we often say on this board, it's not about motivation but about commitment. Make the commitment. On the days when you don't feel motivated (and there will always be those days), the commitment will carry you through. Not that it's easy. It's taken me 55 years to make the commitment to exercise four times a week. But now that I've made the commitment, my previous excuses have fallen away. There are many mornings I don't feel like jogging, but I simply push myself out the door and then it becomes easier. Same with eating. Yesterday I was a lot hungrier than usual (for no particular reason) and had to white-knuckle it a bit, though I did have a couple of snacks. Commitment, not motivation.

Do it while you're young, you won't regret it. Good luck!

F.

SarahJane88
10-12-2012, 06:47 AM
My biggest motivation is thinking how good I will feel and look as I lose weight and become healthier! Set small goals for yourself such as: this week I am going to the gym 3 times or this month I plan to lose 5lbs. Write your goals down and check them off as you go! Something I do to get me to the gym Monday through Friday is, lay out my workout clothes every night and don't make working out and eating healthy optional,it's a priority. Lastly every now and then allow your self a "treat" so you can stay on track without feeling deprived. I calculate into my daily calories to allow myself a glass of chocolate Milk every night. Most importantly you need to believe in yourself. You can do this!! :) Even if you do fall off the wagon every now and then don't beat yourself up, just pick yourself up and get back on!


Vex
10-12-2012, 08:15 AM
Good question.

For me, the initial motivation came from pictures of myself. So often we know how much we weigh mentally but are really blind to the reality. Take some pictures of yourself and keep them where you can see them.

I also feel 100% that this board kept me going through those less motivated times.

What people say is true, it's about commitment mostly. Sure, people fall off plan many times throughout their weight loss, but it's the people that get right back to it that succeed.

soulpatrol
10-12-2012, 08:30 AM
My Motivation is my desire to feel like i did before i had children and put this weight on. Dont get me wrong i love the reasons why i gained weight but i have no baby on board now so why isnt the weight gone? I work out but My Addiction is CARBS. I need to see this as an allergy i suppose. Ive lost 40 pounds so far but im stuck at this weight and the scale wont budge. going on a strict protien diet seems to be my answer but i am a firm believer in not isolating a food group. Ive seen to many fail this way. Its a matter of WHEN to eat the foods and HOW. Ive been trained. and still i fall victim to the CARB attacks. Even i cant say NO. Its like a drug. Anyway, this is my story and i will stay the course forever, if i have to until i lose it.

thexfiles
10-12-2012, 02:25 PM
Great answers :)

I think it's important to remember why we're doing this and I like the idea of keeping pictures of yourself around where you can see them. I love myself shoulders up, but body shots are not fun lol. I had a bit of an eye opener this summer because I went to Italy for a month. While I was there I was walking constantly (we're talking 11 hours a day) and, while it was exhausting, I didn't mind it and I actually started to feel different. I was eating white bread and white pasta and cream sauces and drinking lots of wine every day, but I actually lost weight. In fact when I came home I found out that I had actually gone down 15 pounds that month alone (probably a lot was water weight).

I remember LOVING that feeling of actually having made a change. But now it's October, I feel like some of the weight is back, and I just wish I could get back to that routine of constantly doing something. I think when I was in Italy I didn't have a choice to walk, but now that I'm at home there are a lot of distractions and easy ways out, you know?

Missy Krissy
10-12-2012, 02:50 PM
As Vex mentioned: pictures of myself. Not only overweight pics, but pics of me when I was thin. A few weeks ago I came across old pics of myself and at first I felt bad, but then once I stopped the self pity they became my motivation.

Oh, and for additional motivation I'm looking forward to rewarding myself (in a non-food way) for reaching my mini goals (see sig).

Prestige
10-12-2012, 03:02 PM
Good question.

For me, the initial motivation came from pictures of myself. So often we know how much we weigh mentally but are really blind to the reality. Take some pictures of yourself and keep them where you can see them.

I also feel 100% that this board kept me going through those less motivated times.

What people say is true, it's about commitment mostly. Sure, people fall off plan many times throughout their weight loss, but it's the people that get right back to it that succeed.

I've done this rather recently and it really is an eye opener. Further more I love the concept of you guys referencing the journey as a commitment. I've honestly never heard it put that way or considered it in that light. It's left me with something to think about. I like it!

thexfiles
10-12-2012, 05:17 PM
I agree! Calling it a commitment rather than just something to do does make you think. I mean, really, I sometimes wonder that if I can't commit to going the distance and working hard to make myself healthier, what can I commit to? The things I currently commit to are schoolwork and relaxing when work is done. Lol.

LockItUp
10-12-2012, 05:27 PM
I was sick of being miserable in my own body and decided since I have full control over that I was going to change it. I decided that day that I would put up with no more excuses from myself, and that I would commit to this, long term. I am certainly not motivated all the time -- maybe like only 10% of the time; the rest is following through with the commitment I made to myself. I try to look at it the same way as I look at my marriage. I don't just give my all in the relationship when it's fun and great and lovey-dovey, it's all the time, every day, and it takes work, and it is definitely NOT always easy. I owe myself that same amount of effort!

xoxoadore
10-12-2012, 06:18 PM
clothes and being comfortable in everything I wear and being able to fit into my old wardrobe <3

novangel
10-12-2012, 07:59 PM
In this order:

1) My mental stability depends on it. I have to do cardio, period.
2) I have high cholesterol so physical health factors in.
3) Vanity and bikinis. ;)

theox
10-12-2012, 08:27 PM
As we often say on this board, it's not about motivation but about commitment. Make the commitment. On the days when you don't feel motivated (and there will always be those days), the commitment will carry you through. Not that it's easy. It's taken me 55 years to make the commitment to exercise four times a week. But now that I've made the commitment, my previous excuses have fallen away. There are many mornings I don't feel like jogging, but I simply push myself out the door and then it becomes easier. Same with eating. Yesterday I was a lot hungrier than usual (for no particular reason) and had to white-knuckle it a bit, though I did have a couple of snacks. Commitment, not motivation.

Do it while you're young, you won't regret it. Good luck!

F.

^This. A solution-finding mentality helps too.

You want to lose weight, so you're already motivated.
Are you committed?

If you are, what are you committing yourself to?
Making better eating choices? If so, what specifically will you do to start out?
Being more active? Okay, what can you fit into your schedule right now?
Breaking the negative thought cycle? Great - what methods will you use?

You've still got to commit to actually doing those things and follow through, but it's a lot easier to make changes once you've identified specific things to work on.

kaplods
10-12-2012, 09:34 PM
I have less motivation than I've ever had in my life-long struggle with my weight, and yet my successes have also surpased any previous successes.

For me, it wasn't about motivation, it was about redefining success. In the past, I set the bar WAY too high (though in fairness, I hadn't set the bars, I was just using the bars that I was taught to use, the one's social pressure taught me was the appropriate ones).

I had to redefine success, because I was seeing failure where I was actually experiencing success, I just didn't know that what I was taught and encouraged to believe was absolutely wrong.

I wasn't "failing" when my weight loss slowed and stalled, I was losing successfully, I just didn't realize I was succeeding because I defined anything less than a significant loss (of 2 or more lbs per week) each and every week as dismal failure. I defined anything less than absolute deviation-free, perfectly on-plan eating as failing.

For me, the motivation and commitment came easy when I stopped defining 99% of my efforts as failure.

"This time" for me started with accidental weight loss (or rather incidental weight loss - I lost about 20 lbs as a result of sleep apnea treatment, with no conscious effort on my part). More than three decades of failed weight loss attempts had convinced me that dieting only caused weight gain, so I was terrified that I would regain the 20 lbs if I "tried" to lose weight, so I didn't. Instead, I focused on keeping off the 20 lbs I had lost, and making changes I could live with whether or not weight loss resulted. I decided that my goal was to improve my strength, stamina, overall health and well-being, while keeping off those 20 lbs, and trying to maybe lose "just one more."

I only made changes I was willing to commit to forever, without making them contingent on weight loss. So if I didn't lose weight immediately as a result of a healthy behavior change, it wasn't reason to give up the healthy behavior just because it didn't yeild rapid-enough or drastic-enough benefits. I trusted that the benefits WOULD eventually come.

At first the benefits weren't weight loss (in fact, for two years I struggled just to maintain that 20 lb loss, and gradually become more functional in my life - when I started I was virtually bedbound, and I'm still too disabled to return to work, but at least I'm not spending 90 percent of my day in bed anymore, and I can get dressed without having to stop to rest before finishing and can shower without the aid of my husband and a shower chair).

Just being able to shower and dress without pain and without using every bit of my energy for the day is a gift I no longer take for granted. I remember when just taking a shower would be so difficult, painful and energy-consuming that I'd have to take extra pain medicine to gear up to it, have my husband help me into and out of the shower, and when it was over I'd be so wiped out that I'd sleep for three or four hours afterward.

Some people have told me that I had to hit rock bottom to be motivated to change, but I actually disagree. I believe I had to learn to redefine and recognize success so that I stopped seeing myself as a failure, and if I hadn't been able to do that, my bottom would have gotten much, much lower.

We're essentially taught to set the bar so high when it comes to weight loss, that we insure that virtually no one can feel successful. Some people will continue to do their absolute best in the face of this (despite feeling like failures), while other people collapse under the weight of the failure label.

When I succeeded, I succeeded spectacularly. I taught myself to read before kindergarten. I was in honors classes, graduated high school and college early. Found graduate school almost effortless, always held more than a full-time job or full-time course load. I was an overacheiver in every aspect of my life except for weight loss.

But when I failed, I failed as spectacularly as I succeeded. Or so I thought, but my real problem was defining success and failure and then deciding that success was impossible so the effort was wasted.

If I wasn't losing steadily, I was gaining steadily, because I didn't value weight maintenance ABOVE weight loss. If I couldn't lose, I felt that a gain wasn't any worse than not losing, so if I couldn't lose, I might as well at least get to eat what I wanted.

I thought I was the idiot for feeling this way, but it's really the way most of us are brought up. We're taught that if we've "blown it" for the day, the appropriate response is to binge until we can "start fresh" tomorrow (or next week, or next month, or after the holidays, or after our vacation, or at the new year, or before the next special occasion we want to look good for such as a wedding or class reunion....)

My doctor helped me get started when he admonished me for complaining that I wanted to lose at least two pounds a week like a "normal person" instead of the one pound a month I was accomplishing. My doctor scolded me, telling me that "normal" wasn't 2 lbs a week. Normal was losing nothing. Normal was gaining. Normal was losing a little, getting discouraged, giving up and regaining more. He told me I wasn't normal, I was extraordinary, I just didn't know it because I thought normal was something that it wasn't.

It made me realize that weight loss is like a big city marathon, and we think we're virtually in last place because we see 1,000 people ahead of us, unaware of the 20,000 people behind us. We assume we're lagging behind, when we're actually doing damned well for ourselves. We drop out of the race because we think we can't win, even as we're doing better than most.

Any attempt to educate us on the "reality" of weight loss is seen in a discouraging light rather than a positive light. Tell most morbidly obese folks that 98% of weight loss attempts for morbidly obese dieters, will fail, and the statistic is seen as stating that "weight loss is virtually impossible."

Maybe it's because we define success in a way that most people can't accomplish - and because we're defining success as failure. We don't congratulate the person who has lost 12 lbs in a year (unless they were only 12 lbs overweight to begin with). Instead, we give them condolences. We view them as failures.

And shows like the Biggest Loser and Extreme Makeover weight loss edition are making it worse, where "personal trainers" scream and yell and berate a person for being uncooperative and lazy if they "only" lose 20 lbs in a month.

They're essentially saying to these people, "You've accomplished what most overweight Americans, even those one third your size never accomplish in a lifetime of effort, but you're a pitiful, useless, failure because you should have lost more in order to entertain the people at home watching - and we're telling those people at home they're failures too for not accomplishing even this much."

It doesn't surprise me that weight loss is so difficult, it surprises me that anyone ever acheives it, given how we define success and failure. It's a wonder that anyone accomplishes it, especially if their pattern of weight loss doesn't match the cultural definition of success. Succeeding despite everyone telling you that you're a failure, now that's a real accomplishment (just wish I'd known and believed that 30 years ago).

RoyalAthena
10-12-2012, 09:50 PM
I want a better life that confidence (not neccesarily a smaller waist) will afford me. I want to have a relationship, socialize, have children someday, make some changes in my career. These things can happen but they start with me.

My confidence/self esteem was at an all time low. As I lose weight I am regaining who I was. My personality has blossomed again. I see me having those things I want in my future. It wasn't the world's view of me but my view of myself. I love who I am becoming (who I always was)!

juliastl27
10-12-2012, 09:51 PM
cute clothes.

thats it.

(edit) alright alright thats not *it*. i hate being fat and i feel embarrassed and antisocial when i am.

but the clothes are a lot of it....

MARLA26
10-12-2012, 10:35 PM
My motivation flew the coup for awhile. Now I am back.
I want to feel better.
I want to wear a smaller size.
I have a lot of clothes packed away in boxes. If I can drop another 20 pounds I will have a whole new wardrobe!
WOW!
I NEED TO START LOSING AGAIN.
( I have started my new diet today)

:cheer2: :encore: :cheer2:

thexfiles
10-12-2012, 11:08 PM
You guys are all really inspiring me :) I also LOVE seeing all the results that everyone is getting! It makes me feel like change can really happen for me! I'm starting the 30 Day Shred today so I'll need all the support and motivation I can get lol. My goal seems so far away at this point, oy!

seabiscuit
10-12-2012, 11:13 PM
This is an AWESOME thread!

Motivation is so important and I have struggled with a lot on the weight loss and emotional eating journey. Right now what is keeping me going through what is a rough patch of weight gain from meds, is:

that I want to go on ski trips again

I want to live longer

I hope to reverse or at least help make a lot of my medical conditions that are exacerbated by weight, easier to live with

nicer clothing!

feeling better about myself ;)


I think a lot of us, or at least I'll speak for myself when I say I go through patches when it's easy to lose motivation. I find it important to keep sight of the big picture though, long term goals. For me, I have about 90 lbs to lose, but my initial goal is to lose weight, not gain, then lose a few pounds, then under 200, one thing at a time. If I look at it and say 'oh no, I have all these 90 lbs to lose, how will I do it- I'll feel overwhelmed and want to give up.' It is a matter of perspective for me.

At the end of the day, it can also be a question of, do I want the cookie/treat or the success ;) ?

Amy

juliastl27
10-12-2012, 11:26 PM
My goal seems so far away at this point, oy!


i have to go in mini goals. thinking about losing 37 more lbs is too much to handle. right now im thinking about getting to 185, then im going to move on to 179 and i havent thought beyond that. thinking about 37 lbs feels WAY too overwhelming. i can deal with losing 2 right now. then ill move forward

MrsTryingAgain
10-12-2012, 11:51 PM
When I mentioned to a co-worker that I was trying to watch what I eat, exercise & be healthier, she asked me why? Now, realize that she is in her early 20s & of slim build. She asked if I was doing it for health reasons or for astetics.
Definitely health. I can't fool myself any more. I've got far too much weight on my frame. I'm not getting younger. And I've also lied to myself that I won't possibly die at a "young age". Yes, my mom is a alive & pretty darned healthy for a woman in her mid-80s. Dad however died at the age of 71. He had COPD, but he also had HBP & ended up dying of a massive heart attack.
I've blinded myself to the fact over the years that I have Mom's genetic makeup but I ALSO HAVE DAD'S! I can't have it both ways. Dad's blue eyes but Mom's health...I can't pick & choose my genetic make up.
So my motivator is health. I'm tired of being tired all the time. I also hate getting winded when I have to do physical things (housework, shopping). The physical changes are just a bonus.

bingingerrday
10-13-2012, 12:18 AM
Because I hate my life and myself. Nothing more, nothing less.

By the way, how do you get those weight trackers in your signature?

thexfiles
10-13-2012, 03:55 AM
You shouldn't ever hate yourself completely! I understand what you mean though, you may dislike yourself, but never hate yourself. Remember that you're great no matter what, but in losing weight you're deciding to change for the better because you want to. It will make you feel great and it will allow you to be an even MORE awesome person.

As for the tickers, I went here to the 3 fat chicks ticker page. It's hard to find so I just searched for it in google.

But some people have to wait 20 days for their signature editing option to come up (I'm still waiting for mine).

shcirerf
10-14-2012, 12:20 AM
To the OP.

There are so many things that motivate me.

My mother has always been obese, at 74 she has so many health problems, I don't even know where to start.

I raised my kids different. They are healthy, athletic, and strong. Eat mostly good, with the now and then indulgence. Their chosen professions require good health and athletic ability. AKA SWAT Sniper!

I understand that at 25, living a healthy lifestyle seems tough, but, as you age it gets harder and harder, and the health issues will catch up with you.

Better to figure it out now, rather than later!:hug::D

epifania
10-14-2012, 02:15 PM
I saw old pictures of a healthier me, and I wanna go back to that happy place where I used to be. As simple as that.

Em Coconut
10-14-2012, 05:08 PM
I wanna start to really live...
I wanna be able to wear whatever I want and not feel uncomfortable about it.
I wanna be able to feel good about myself
And when I go back to school next fall, I don't wanna be the "fat girl"...not again...

CleverName
10-14-2012, 07:17 PM
As we often say on this board, it's not about motivation but about commitment. Make the commitment. On the days when you don't feel motivated (and there will always be those days), the commitment will carry you through. Not that it's easy. It's taken me 55 years to make the commitment to exercise four times a week. But now that I've made the commitment, my previous excuses have fallen away. There are many mornings I don't feel like jogging, but I simply push myself out the door and then it becomes easier. Same with eating. Yesterday I was a lot hungrier than usual (for no particular reason) and had to white-knuckle it a bit, though I did have a couple of snacks. Commitment, not motivation.

Do it while you're young, you won't regret it. Good luck!

F.

Thank you for this, freelancemomma, it is really good to hear this.

thexfiles
10-14-2012, 10:15 PM
Here are my full motivations...some of them might seem stupid, they sometimes even feel trivial to me, but here they are:

1) I want to meet the one and feel comfortable with them and not worry about myself (all my past relationships have had an underlying tension because I was always worried about how I looked).
2) I want to wear the styles that I really love (sure you can "make them to fit you" but they'll look better on me if I feel comfortable in them).
3) I want to live the longest I possibly can
4) I want to just feel better in general
5) If I commit to this, maybe I'll commit better to other things.

I just find it so hard to START and actually get off my desk chair or get off the couch. I almost feel as if I'm dragging myself down because I don't want to change, but I HAVE to. I just need that official kick in the butt to get me going! The hardest part about this is that I have no one else to work with me. My parents are too busy (but both are overweight) and my friends are all too busy or moved away.

Oh how will I do this. How can I convince myself that it's good to start going and not good to think too much about it until I've convinced myself to just forget it.

heathermichigan
10-14-2012, 10:54 PM
I just find it so hard to START and actually get off my desk chair or get off the couch. I almost feel as if I'm dragging myself down because I don't want to change, but I HAVE to. I just need that official kick in the butt to get me going!

Oh how will I do this. How can I convince myself that it's good to start going and not good to think too much about it until I've convinced myself to just forget it.

From someone who has started and stopped countless times and then managed to lose 80 last year, you just need to DO IT. That may seem harsh, and I don't mean it to be, but you just can't overthink it. Just do something. Do it now.

For me, the diet is easier than the exercise, so when I had to restart this year from my 30 lb regain (personal issues, etc), I started there. I'm 100% on plan 90% of the time, and just a little off the other times, and it is always planned. I'm easing back into an exercise routine right now.

And you must, must, must depend on yourself to do it--not a friend, not a coworker, not a family member. They might give up, but you won't. Come to these boards for virtual support, multiple times a day if you need to. There are threads you can post on to weigh in daily, put your food choices and exercise every day to stay accountable, etc.

We are all in the same boat together. We all have to figure out how to make it work. Propel yourself forward--don't give yourself an option--and you will find your motivation in your success.

Moving Forward
10-15-2012, 12:12 AM
I had a few things happen that scared me into starting my weight loss journey. First, Kaiser mailed me out a letter this summer about considering their medical weight loss services. I initially shrugged off this letter and felt insulted. Then I realized that my husband hadn't got one, nor had anyone else I mentioned the letter to. Then, after being a size 14 for at least 20 years, I found myself suddenly needing to buy bigger work clothes. I was mortified and very depressed on that shopping trip. Shortly after, a friend of mine sat at my kitchen counter for hours and talked to me about her health issues and weight loss. Somewhere in the midst of this conversation, I committed to myself to return the size 16 clothes and lose the weight.

I returned those clothes months ago and my size 14 wardrobe is fitting well again. Buying a new, smaller wardrobe, is a huge motivation for me now. I'm also highly motivated to no longer fall into the "overweight" category anymore. I have to agree with the sentiments about commitment. My motivation waxes and wanes, but my commitment is what has kept me going.

angieand2girls
10-15-2012, 08:22 AM
For once in my life I want to wear a two piece bikini on the beach! Is that too much to ask? :) I at least have to see if that's still possible after years of yoyo'ing and 2 babies. I'm going to give it my best shot!

Of course I want to be healthy and all those other non-vain reasons. ;)

tubolard
10-15-2012, 09:33 AM
Me. I am my motivation, I want to be healthier and happier. In my past attempts to lose I always wanted to lose weight so that other people wouldn't judge me or because i thought that I was somehow worthless because of my weight. Now I understand that my worth isn't my body, it is my abilities. This time around I am doing it for me and me alone.

OhThePlaces
10-15-2012, 11:53 AM
I've gone up and down in the last couple of years. I'm currently UP from this spring and my biggest current motivation is to fit back into my clothes. It's so frustrating because I have a fabulous closet full of size 4 and 6 clothes that are now 10-15 lbs away from fitting. I want to be excited about getting dressed up again.

I want to feel comfortable in my skin again.

I want the energy that I have when cutting out the tons of crap food that I've been consuming.

thexfiles
10-16-2012, 02:20 AM
I'm trying to do this thing where I don't eat a lot of carbs (if any) after lunch. It's really a lot harder than I thought! However, I put up pictures of myself that I don't like as a motivational helper. Hopefully this helps me. I wonder if my "I'll do it eventually" attitude is stemming from fear of failing again.

nina cloudstar
10-16-2012, 06:50 AM
My motivation is complete vanity!! I want to be hot and feel confident in my body!!

topsy81
10-16-2012, 07:30 AM
My motivation is for my little boy, so I can run around after him, and be healthy and to have more energy. Plus I have been asked to be a bridesmaid next may.

xxx

DisappearingActs
10-16-2012, 11:40 AM
My motivation was losing so that I could stop being self-conscious about my body... and fashion.

Fashion is still a motivator, but now, I keep going because I've come so far, and I'm so close to goal. I love the sense of pride I feel.

FunSize
10-16-2012, 12:32 PM
My motivation seems to change the older I get! When I was younger it was always about looking good for potential boyfriends!! LOL! But now that I am married I *do* want to look good for my husband, but also Health is a big factor.
At 210 I was having heart palpitations when I laid on the side. I felt unwell, had no energy. So I know all the reasons to not go BACK to where I was!

onic28
10-16-2012, 11:04 PM
I have many sources of motivation... some more trivial than others!

1. I sincerely want to feel better about myself and how I look
2. I want to wear clothes that I like, not clothes that I buy because they "hide" my fat.
3. I want to be healthy so I can have a better chance at a safe pregnancy... and to be fit, active mom.
4. I want to surprise my husband with a "new and improved" wife when he gets home from his deployment
5. I want to shop at AE again lol
6. I want to make it through a whole DVD of p90x without stopping! :)

masterptr
10-16-2012, 11:10 PM
clothes and being comfortable in everything I wear and being able to fit into my old wardrobe <3


I totally agree.
clothes shopping is so much more fun!

joefla70
10-16-2012, 11:28 PM
My motivation is my kids and realizing that if I didn't lose weight now, I might not be around for them as long as I hope to be. Now that I am over 40, the realization has set in that I am not a young person anymore and that people start to develop serious health issues at my age as a result of being obese. Recently one of my co-workers was telling me about actuarial data used by life insurers and the life expectancy of people who are obese. Then he made the comment that if you pay attention to old people... you don't see many obese ones! He is right! Not that what he said was a revelation of something that I didn't know, but the problem is that I wasn't really thinking about it.

Psyence
10-19-2012, 04:30 PM
To be honest I'm not sure what my main motivation is, but things that are keeping me in check on this diet where others haven't include:

- Wanting to look good. It's vain but there you go. I wanna be skinny, dammit!
- Wanting to be healthy - I'm terrified that if I keep eating like I have in the past that I'll get too far gone to do anything about it.
- Wanting to be comfortable in my own skin - I've spent so long hating myself for the way I look and so long avoiding mirrors and trying to hide myself in public because I think I look horrible. I want to be proud of who I am and how hard I'll have worked when I reach my target weight.

Blarney
10-19-2012, 04:48 PM
I want to live to see grandchildren.

mom23kids1
10-19-2012, 07:15 PM
As a 25 year old you'd think I would have all the motivation in the world, but I don't, and I find that to be one of the hardest things for me and my journey. I want nothing more than to lose this weight, but every time I start my journey I end up stalling after 1 or 2 weeks! I was on the South Beach diet in grade 11 and rowing every day, so at that point I was the smallest I'd been (with the exception of elementary school, but let's be real lol). I think too negatively sometimes, which might also contribute, and maybe I'm just ultimately afraid that I'll fail again.

So I really need help with my motivation and just making time for this. I'm a student, but I know I have time to exercise more...so why DON'T I?

What are your motivations for your weight loss journey? What helps you get up off the couch and away from your fears, negative feelings, or just plain lazy moments?


Mine was finding out a few weeks ago I had elevated blood sugar. That led to a horribly nasty glucose test that thankfully came back in the normal range. But, it was a big wake up call. Over the past few years I've steadily gained and I'm now at my highest weight. Obesity and diabetes runs rampant in my family tree, so I knew where I was headed if I didn't get pro-active NOW.

As for exercise-I'm walking. Simple, easy, and really effective :) I joined a walking club at my church and we meet once a week, (we walked 3.1 miles this week yay!). I'm also going to work on walking 2-3 times by myself on top of that.

Luffz
10-21-2012, 05:45 AM
Hmm - I think my motivation is the fact that I sing a lot, and on stage as well (we're talking classical music, operas, recitals, etc.), and I'm not really confident with having that extra weight that I do have, so I want to be able to stand on stage with confidence to act my heart out, while I'm singing. Another thing is, that it is important to be fit when singing, because a lot of the technique is how much your body can work, and how much control and strength you have in your body (especially in the back and abs). So, that's probably my biggest motivation.

Lately, I've been motivated a lot by the whole "healthy living" thing. I want to grow my hair healthy, I'd like glowing skin and enough energy to study as well. I've been thinking a lot about vitamins and minerals lately, instead of focusing on calories. This is actually also a huge motivation for me. ((:

It's really awesome reading about all the factors and stuff that motivate you. It's quite inspiring.

Btw, how do you get those cute 'tickers'? :-)

Arctic Mama
10-21-2012, 05:34 PM
Lufftz - tickers are available when you've been on the site for a certain period of time. I believe it is twenty days :)