Metabolic Research Center - Please help, I don't understand how to portion out the recipes




yankeeoregon
09-13-2012, 10:31 PM
I am frustrated because I want to get into the recipes but the ones that make several servings are confusing in that i have no idea how to portion it to come up with 4oz protein, 8oz veggies, etc. For example, the cheeseburger soup recipe: it says it makes 4 servings, but how much of what PER SERVING? How many cups or whatever do I serve myself and since everything is kinda mixed together in these recipes how do I know I'm getting even amounts of what is needed at each meal (like I said 4oz of this, 4oz of that, etc.) Thank you in advance for helping explain, I'm getting so tired of plain broccoli and separate plain meat:(


reji
09-14-2012, 12:33 AM
I'm not on the MRC plan, so I can only speak generally. If a recipe says it makes 4 servings, and there's a total of 16 oz of protein in there, then 16 oz divided by 4 servings means that each serving has 4 oz of protein. In something like a soup, you make sure you're getting 1 serving by measuring the total volume (maybe the whole batch makes 4 cups) and dividing by 4--one cup would be one serving and would contain 4 oz of protein. A casserole is probably easier because you can just eyeball cutting it into 4 pieces. One piece is one serving and would contain 4 oz of protein.

But it is possible that one serving could contain 3-1/2 oz of protein and another could have 4-1/2 oz of protein, depending on how the size of the meat bits. I figure that it evens out if I eat the whole dish over four meals. If it's important for this plan to be completely exact at each meal, then you're probably better off sticking with the separate broccoli and meat meal.

yankeeoregon
09-14-2012, 12:27 PM
I'm not on the MRC plan, so I can only speak generally. If a recipe says it makes 4 servings, and there's a total of 16 oz of protein in there, then 16 oz divided by 4 servings means that each serving has 4 oz of protein. In something like a soup, you make sure you're getting 1 serving by measuring the total volume (maybe the whole batch makes 4 cups) and dividing by 4--one cup would be one serving and would contain 4 oz of protein. A casserole is probably easier because you can just eyeball cutting it into 4 pieces. One piece is one serving and would contain 4 oz of protein.

But it is possible that one serving could contain 3-1/2 oz of protein and another could have 4-1/2 oz of protein, depending on how the size of the meat bits. I figure that it evens out if I eat the whole dish over four meals. If it's important for this plan to be completely exact at each meal, then you're probably better off sticking with the separate broccoli and meat meal.
Thank you for your help but I am a still confused. If you imagine spooning out soup with a measuring cup or ladle you will have various amounts of liquid, meat pieces, and vegetable pieces. When you scoop it out 4oz of protein doesn't just end up on your spoon, and what I am trying to say is that it is mixed in with the vegetables and liquid so how would you come even remotely close to knowing what portions of each nutrient you were serving yourself? And I don't mean this to sound snarky but I do think one has to be on the diet to understand how important the ratios per meal are in order to stay in ketosis. But I thank you for your help.


meazie
09-14-2012, 12:50 PM
Thank you for your help but I am a still confused. If you imagine spooning out soup with a measuring cup or ladle you will have various amounts of liquid, meat pieces, and vegetable pieces. When you scoop it out 4oz of protein doesn't just end up on your spoon, and what I am trying to say is that it is mixed in with the vegetables and liquid so how would you come even remotely close to knowing what portions of each nutrient you were serving yourself? And I don't mean this to sound snarky but I do think one has to be on the diet to understand how important the ratios per meal are in order to stay in ketosis. But I thank you for your help.

When I make soup I keep the protein separate and then add it to the broth/veggies. That way I know the amount I'm getting.

Hope that helps...

reji
09-15-2012, 06:50 PM
And I don't mean this to sound snarky but I do think one has to be on the diet to understand how important the ratios per meal are in order to stay in ketosis. But I thank you for your help.

No worries. That's exactly why I mentioned that I'm not on MRC. I didn't have all the details on your plan, but I wanted to offer at least a little help.

kaplods
09-15-2012, 07:45 PM
Thank you for your help but I am a still confused. If you imagine spooning out soup with a measuring cup or ladle you will have various amounts of liquid, meat pieces, and vegetable pieces. When you scoop it out 4oz of protein doesn't just end up on your spoon, and what I am trying to say is that it is mixed in with the vegetables and liquid so how would you come even remotely close to knowing what portions of each nutrient you were serving yourself? And I don't mean this to sound snarky but I do think one has to be on the diet to understand how important the ratios per meal are in order to stay in ketosis. But I thank you for your help.


I don't mean to sound snarky either, but one doesn't have to be on MRC to understand ketosis. Ketosis is not so fragile that simply dividing a recipe by eye, is going to break the fragile balance. Sure if you drain out all of the veggies and all of the veggies in one portion, and all the meat in another, then you MIGHT risk disrupting ketosis (even then probably not, unless the veggies are high-carb veggies), but by dividing the recipe into equal portions that look to contain similar amounts of each ingredient, you're not going to risk breaking the fragile balance of ketosis - because the balance isn't so fragile.

You don't have to take my word for it. There are many resources online, both for MRC specifically and for other ketogenic diets. So browse these sites (just google ketogenic diets) and browse the FAQ sections if you don't believe me, and see if I'm not telling you the truth.

aw82797
09-16-2012, 08:21 AM
I don't mean to sound snarky either, but one doesn't have to be on MRC to understand ketosis. Ketosis is not so fragile that simply dividing a recipe by eye, is going to break the fragile balance. Sure if you drain out all of the veggies and all of the veggies in one portion, and all the meat in another, then you MIGHT risk disrupting ketosis (even then probably not, unless the veggies are high-carb veggies), but by dividing the recipe into equal portions that look to contain similar amounts of each ingredient, you're not going to risk breaking the fragile balance of ketosis - because the balance isn't so fragile.

You don't have to take my word for it. There are many resources online, both for MRC specifically and for other ketogenic diets. So browse these sites (just google ketogenic diets) and browse the FAQ sections if you don't believe me, and see if I'm not telling you the truth.

Thanks, Im going to google these & check it out, I think the problem is that mrc convinces us that even one bite off plan kicks you out of ketosis for 3 days so that makes it pretty scary to go off your serving amounts if you really want to stick to the diet. They convince us that it really is that fragile of a balance

aw82797
09-16-2012, 08:52 AM
I am frustrated because I want to get into the recipes but the ones that make several servings are confusing in that i have no idea how to portion it to come up with 4oz protein, 8oz veggies, etc. For example, the cheeseburger soup recipe: it says it makes 4 servings, but how much of what PER SERVING? How many cups or whatever do I serve myself and since everything is kinda mixed together in these recipes how do I know I'm getting even amounts of what is needed at each meal (like I said 4oz of this, 4oz of that, etc.) Thank you in advance for helping explain, I'm getting so tired of plain broccoli and separate plain meat:(

you could always divide the recipe and only cook one serving at a time. My cookbook only shows 2 servings for the cheeseburger soup but one serving would be as follows.

2 oz lean ground buffalo, turkey, or chicken (or more depending on if you are on meta-slim plus or not)
1.5 oz chopped green onion
2.5 oz chopped celery
1/2 tsp dried basil
1/2 tsp dried parsley
1 tsp canola oil
1 cup hot water
1 envelope cream of chicken supplement
1 oz chedder cheese cubed

kaplods
09-16-2012, 10:02 AM
Now that I see the actual recipe, there's not enough carbs in the recipe to disrupt ketosis unless you ate many servings of the recipe. Eating even six or more servings might not even do it. Obviously eating more than the alotted servings would upset the calorie balance, but it wouldn't affect ketosis.

The only potentially problematic ingredient would be the green onion, and I think you'd have to eat an excessively large amount of green onion to do it (far, far more than the recipe calls for). If it weren't for the green onion, I would say you could eat endless amounts of this recipe and not disrupt ketosis (again calories would be a problem, but not ketosis).

The bulb part of the onion is what contains the most carbohydrate, so if you avoid the white part, and use more of the green stalk (especially the "hollow" stems), you avoid most of the carbohydrates.

In this kind of recipe, where so little is used, I think it would take a LOT of onion to get enough carb to disrupt ketosis, but if you wanted to be "extra careful" you could use mostly the green part.

I'm very interested in the ketogenic protein sparing modified fasting programs like Ideal Protein and MRC, but I do wish the programs weren't so reluctant to share the science with the customers who want it.

I do suspect that the plan developers believe they will lose customers if the customers realize they can duplicate the effects of the diet without the name-brand products. Maybe I'm naive, but I don't believe this is nearly as true as the companies may fear. I think most people do gravitate towards established brands and companies that will do most or all of the work for them. Thus the "big name" brands will always have the advantage.

I think there's enough business to go around, and if there were less mystery about these diets, fewer people would believe them dangerous, and there'd be more business for ALL of the existing PSMF companies (probably more business than they'd be able to currently handle).

Of course, that would open up a wider market, and PSMF products would probably end up in the grocery stores, and maybe in the long run it would threaten some companies, but I think even here the established brands would have the advantage.

As usual, I've gotten way off topic (Man though wouldn't it be great to see Ideal Protein, MRC, and all the ready-made PSMF products in the grocery store aisles. I guess I've proved the company's point - many of us WOULD do it ourselves, and we'd buy what tasted best and was cheapest, so it would completley change their production and marketing strategies).