100 lb. Club - How does it feel to lose the first 100 lbs?




LadyPetite
08-01-2012, 07:19 PM
There was a thread in the maintainer's area about how it felt to be thin. It's an old one and not as active anymore but reading it gave me tons of inspiration.

Most of us starting in this area of the forum have or had to lose 100+ lbs. Right now it feels like a far-away goal. I currently weigh 270 lbs and in the back of my mind I think I'm not only going to look the same at 170 lbs but also feel the same. For example, I still feel like I won't be able to climb stairs, or get up off the floor with ease (I'm 27 but already it feels very difficult to sit on the floor cross-legged or easily get off the floor and even the chair).

For anyone who's lost about a 100 lbs (not necessarily reached goal), how did you feel? What could you do that you couldn't do 100 lbs before?


ValRock
08-01-2012, 08:03 PM
AMAZING. Beyond Amazing. There is no describing it.

I can do anything. :)

ETA: at my high weight I was sore all the time, my joints ached, I had no energy. Now, everything is easier. I feel no pain, at all... I can run and jump and squat and sit on the floor. My mind is the only thing holding me back now. My body isn't in the way anymore.

AwShucks
08-01-2012, 08:26 PM
Trust me; you won't feel the same 100 lbs from now. Physically, so much will change. I can remember that I actually felt smaller -- even shorter (I'm 5'5"). When you stand next to a tall man, you actually feel petite -- even with more weight to lose! I even felt smaller behind the wheel of my car!

Baths were a joy because with very little effort I could get out of the tub. And, taking the stairs was fun, not a chore. I even took tap dance lessons for a while!

It's really a great feeling. Unfortunately, I've never experienced it for very long - I hope to keep the weight off this time. Sometimes, I wonder if, when I've lost all the weight, I'll miss the exhiliration that comes along with LOSING. It can be frustrating as it's happening, but all in all, it's thrilling to see and feel yourself getting smaller.


Arctic Mama
08-01-2012, 08:51 PM
It feels incredible in very subtle ways. Since I have lot the wright slowly, with plenty of mainenance and breaks for various reasons (like the one I am in now) the changes are almost imperceptible, and yet they hit me at the strangest times.

Being able to cross my legs without having my muscles quivering with the effort of trying to keep them together is one.

Realizing I don't have to select my hairstyles based on which ones make my face look fat, because it looks normally proportioned no matter what I choose.

My kids giving me hugs, and realizing their arms can easily go around me and not just clutch at my belly.

Things like that aren't obvious at any particular weight, but cumulatively they signify the change in my body. Things that used to be hard, like getting up off the floor, are much easier. Just little bits here and there that remind me how different I am now, and why I never want to go back.

kaplods
08-01-2012, 09:16 PM
I'm not sure it "feels" like anything, which I think is why it's so easy to gain weight back..... I keep expecting to FEEL differently, but it's just me in here... and the only reason it feels a bit "differently" than all the other times I've lose lots of weight, is that I have a "record" of myself at the beginning in the form of my disability application. And because I've journaled all the way, this time (I haven't kept many of the journals, but just the act of writing them has solidified some of the experimence in my me).

I've only lost 100 lbs once (this time), the previous times I lose 70, 65, and another 60 - 65. Though the first time I would have expected it to feel more, I don't know more "something" than the current 100 lbs, because I was in my teens and had gone from 225 lbs to 155 lbs. The proportionate amount of weight was higher.

The problem with weight loss in terms of "feeling it," is the same as "seeing it." Every morning you wake up and look in the mirror and you look exactly the same, and you feel exactly the same too, and trying to remember what you looked and felt like 20, 30, 50, even 100 lbs isn't really easy, because that person doesn't exist anymore and they haven't for an awful lot of yesterdays.

This time, I knew I was going to have a challenge feeling differently, so sometimes I make a list of all the things I couldn't do when I started that I can do now. It helps me see the difference, even though I can't always see or feel it.

I really encourage folks to "write it down." If you haven't lost it yet, right down what you can't do, what it feels like to try, what you can do and how it feels to do it, how you feel afterward... be as descriptive as possible, because you want to remember it, so that you're determined not to ever have to try to lose it all over again.

The weight comes on, and comes off slowly, so if you're not paying attention, you don't feel any differently. Heck, in so many ways, I don't feel any differently in my head, than I did in kindergarten, 41 years ago.

I still remember passionately feeling (and still feeling today) that a "restroom" should be a beautiful room filled with recliners and couches, not toilets; because I can't say I've ever rested in a restroom.

This time, I won't let myself forget, because I've written so much of it down, and have kept at least enough of it for me to remember. Any time I'm tempted to give up, I remind myself of what I can do now, that I couldn't do (such as shower without a shower chair, and lift my hands over my head without pain), and I list all the things I still want to do, that weight loss and exercise might allow me to do (because if my health issues, I don't know what I'll ever really be able to do, but "just not going back" is motivation enough not to quit).

I may never "feel" different, or truly appreciate how far I've come, but now I have my written proof that I AM different, so I can be motivated by the facts, not just my feelings (or lack of them).

Riddy
08-01-2012, 10:10 PM
I'm still discovering new things, so some of it is fresh in my mind.

My knees felt better going up the stairs at only 25 pounds down.

Getting up from the yoga mat is one fluid motion, not a roll and a heave and pushing up with both hands.

Getting in and out of my sportscar is easier and more fluid.

I don't feel like I'm oozing out the sides of my chair at work. :p

I'll have to ponder this a little more and see what else I can come up with.

ikesgirl80
08-01-2012, 10:28 PM
Everything is better! I can run, play with my students at recess, sleep without waking everyone in the house up from my snoring, walk up stairs, carry tons of groceries, bags, etc., wear cute clothes, do almost everything my trainer asks me to do (sometimes it takes a few tries, but I get there eventually), fit in booths, movie theater seats, roller coasters, plane seats. I can do normal household chores without taking breaks, touch my toes, fit in my car without looking like a clown in a toy car (seriously!), and cross my legs... The list goes on and on...

I used to think like kaplods. One thing I did was make "notes" on facebook and I do go back and read it. I try on clothes every 5-10 pounds, even if I know they won't fit yet, just to see how close I'm getting. I share every single "I just ___! I haven't been able to do that since ___!" moment I have with anyone who will listen. I am determined to enjoy maintaining my weight loss for the rest of my life, and if I happen to lose more in the process, maintain that loss also. Cherish every moment, and never take it for granted.

LadyPetite
08-02-2012, 12:37 AM
Thank you so much everyone for sharing your experiences. I absolutely feed off the positive energy and excitement from these kind of posts. It's an instant mood booster.

kaplods, the idea about writing everything down is brilliant. There are so many things I'm unable to do or do them with a lot of discomfort. Despite that, I still give in to binges and unhealthy eating. And then I feel miserable about not being able to do much physically. It's a vicious cycle. Maybe if I write how I feel at every step, what I can and can't do and what my mental and physical limitations are because of my weight, it'll keep me from giving in to future unhealthy habits. Thank you.

I would love to see more posts on this.

kelly315
08-02-2012, 07:09 AM
It's different for everybody, good or bad. In a lot of ways I felt better, but in others my mind just wouldn't catch up. The issue for me was that I had lost sooo much weight and spent sooo much time on it (almost a year) that it became a really frustrating experience for me that I wasn't yet thin. I didn't even feel "normal" sized, although I probably was close. I, like a lot of people, had body dysmorphia and had a hard time accepting that I wasn't 300 pounds anymore. I think that's the reason (the frustration of it all) that I gained all the weight back, and quickly.

However, body dysmorphia does end given enough patience, and then you can start to enjoy your new self more.

Trazey34
08-02-2012, 08:57 AM
It's weird, but 55 lbs. made me lose my mind LOL 100 came and went with a "oh wow that's cool" but 55 was the most I'd ever lost and I thought I was a rock star LOL

As for how I feel after 100, or 165 now, is a funny answer - I'm one of those weirdos who never really was miserable being fat. I didn't hurt, I didn't shy away from social situations, I had/have true love in my life. Losing the weight sure made it easier to get around, and I have some more energy I think, but more importantly, I'll probably LIVE longer. The older I get, the greedier I get for life :) And the life I have will be better as I age etc.

I was ALWAYS a genuinely happy person, no matter what size. I NEVER once felt I was a 'bad' person for being fat, or that thin people were 'good'. That didn't change. I worry sometimes when I read posts about "when I lose 100 pounds i will feel XYZ about myself" nope, not always the case I'm afraid. If your self-esteem or self-worth is predicated on how much you weigh, it's bound to shift. Losing weight is no cure-all for what ails you but it sure feels grand :D

kaplods
08-02-2012, 01:37 PM
I worry sometimes when I read posts about "when I lose 100 pounds i will feel XYZ about myself" nope, not always the case I'm afraid.

I know what you mean, and this reminded me to add that when I suggested that folks write down what they can't do now because of their weight... to make sure it really is something they can't do (and not just something they don't want to do) because of their weight (is it really the weight stopping you, or your own fear that you think will disappear along with the weight).

I cringe when I see folks post, or hear folks say that they can't wait to get thin so they can swim. Swimming and water exercise is hands-down the best exercise for most very overweight folks, and anyone with joint and/or mobility issues.

It saddens me tremendously that we live in a culture in which swimming and being seen in a swimming suit is seen as something that only people with perfect bodies should do. Even celebrities are slammed in the fashion and gossip media for allowing themselves to be seen with imperfect bodies (even if the celeb has become a little overweight, or even if they've just committed the "crime" of getting old... really how great do you expect a 75 year old actress or actor to look in a bathing suit?)

I think we've learned to sacrifice too much in the name of weight loss, and the deprivation becomes so overwhelming that we make it not worth the effort. By living life to the fullest, and not letting the weight stop you unless it physically stops you, weight loss becomes much less about "giving up everything fun and rewarding" in life until some magic weight at which you suddenly deserve to have a life.

Elladorine
08-02-2012, 02:02 PM
I can do a lot more physically. At my highest, it was painful to have to stand for more than 5 minutes at a time (walking was more tolerable, it was the standing still that would make my legs ache terribly). I was slow and lumbering. You know those fold-up tables with the attached benches that a lot of grade school cafeterias have? I worked an after school program and had trouble sitting with the kids. Theater seats were a problem. My asthma got pretty fierce (I thought I had outgrown it but it came back when I got over 300 lbs). I had trouble getting up off the floor, or even out of chairs at times, come to think of it. I was always, always completely and utterly exhausted. I had no agility, no balance. And I couldn't buy jeans off the rack even from a plus sized specialty shop, so I stopped wearing them altogether.

I'm far from my goal weight, but I can walk and stand without issue, and can even run/jog for short distances (although it's something that needs a lot of work yet). I haven't tried sitting at one of those fold-up tables in years but I'm willing to bet I'd be fine now, as I am in theater seats. My asthma has gotten much better and I have high hopes it will go away like it did when I was younger. I can get off the floor easily now, although it's not the most comfortable place for me to sit yet, lol. I'm not tired all the time, in fact I feel like I have a decent amount of energy (still room to improve there). I feel more agile and able as I move around, doing every-day things. Oh, and I'm small enough to buy jeans off the rack at Old Navy (they only go up to a size 20). :)

The changes are small and slow, but they certainly add up. I can bend and move again. I can squat to pick something dropped on the floor without a second thought, when I used to loathe having to reach for something on the bottom shelf of the fridge. It's been good to feel more able, and I can only imagine it gets better from here. The thing is that it's such a slow change that it may be easy to not notice at all.

angieand2girls
08-02-2012, 07:43 PM
Wow, you 100 lb losers are all SOOOO inspiring!! I can't wait until it's me!! I can only imagine (for now lol) the sense of victory that you all felt having completely such a HUGE challenge. I'm inspired! Wonderful! :)

LaurieDawn
08-02-2012, 07:52 PM
I lost just short of 100 pounds about four years ago, and it was amazing. BUT - since we have essentially the same starting weight, I thought I would quickly address how good it feels to lose 25 pounds. I have started running and weight lifting. Now, when I see people outside running in great shape, I no longer feel a mixture of guilt and jealousy. I instead am simply convinced that I will be like that soon enough. I haven't actually had to stop wearing clothes yet, but clothes that were super tight are now baggy. I have to continually remind myself that I am actually still fat, cuz I really don't feel like it. I feel flexible and light and no longer plagued by guilt.

I love how Trazey and Kaplods continually remind us that fat DOES NOT mean misery, nor is it a moral failing. I couldn't agree more. But I still suffered from constant guilt over poor food choices. Now, I can eat ice cream with my kids and feel no guilt, though I seldom want to anymore.

The benefits of eating well and exercising come way before the noticeable weight loss - at least for me. It doesn't mean I never struggle, but for today, I am grateful I am on plan.

healthyginger
08-02-2012, 07:55 PM
Lady petite : !st-love the name -at 5'1 my self I also dream of being a petite lady again. I just wanted to thankyou for this thread-it's given me inspiration and ideas already to keep on treakin. I've only lost 20 pds but already feel better. More energy- using walker instead of wheelchair so much- feeling more alert-though all that may just be due to eating healthy now-only 10% sweet or white stuff.

Vex
08-03-2012, 11:52 AM
I haven't hit 100 lost yet but am getting close. :)

I'm never tired anymore and it's fantastic! I used to be tired and sleep all the time. I also stopped snoring completely which has made my sleep much more restful.

I don't feel like I'm falling off my work chair now anymore either. I used to feel like I was falling off the edge of it constantly so it was putting a lot of pressure on my legs - but now I feel like I fit.

I recently went on every single ride down at universal studios with no second thoughts if I'd fit.

Shopping in the non plus size area is freaking awesome as well!

I know it feels far away. Now though, it seriously just feels like yesterday though I was 280lbs and I'm so glad I started when I did.

linJber
08-03-2012, 08:05 PM
When I weighed over 250 I always thought of myself as being pretty fit for a fat girl. Walk all day at Disney World? No problem. Shop at the outlet mall all day with my daughter? No problem. Go camping and do my share of the heavy work? No problem. Lift the kayaks onto the roof of the car? No problem. What WAS a problem was that I had no problems doing any of those things. I felt I was OK at my weight and had no real reason to lose. My BP was fine. Same with cholesterol, etc.

Then a group of friends sort of had an intervention with another friend who had been talking about weight loss surgery (she saw it as the easy way to lose weight) and we decided to join a gym together and see if we could all lose weight and get healthier. Stubborn me decided to show the friend who was considering surgery that we could do this - and in the same amount of time it would be for someone who did have surgery.

Let me tell you that I can't even list the things that are easier to do now. And all along I thought things weren't bad! It is absolutely amazing how much easier every little thing is, from putting the kayaks on the roof of the car to tying my shoes. DD commented that she no longer has to slow her pace to allow me to keep up with her. I didn't realize she did that. I bounce when I am standing in line where I used to try to lean on something. My back NEVER hurts. I haven't taken a single antacid - not one - since I cut the crap out of my diet, but I still eat spicier than most of my friends. I haven't had a headache since I started eating better. I haven't had a cold or any illness. I feel 20 years younger than I did at 252 pounds, and at 252 pounds I thought I felt 20 years younger than I was. (I guess I feel 21 now!)

I disagree with Kaplods on this one - I feel like a different person. I hope this feeling keeps me from regaining. Ten months so far and no gain. I hope I learned my lesson. When you realize it is all for the better, it keeps you going. Good luck. I can't wait to hear how you feel after 25 pounds. There will be changes as soon as that.

Lin

carter
08-03-2012, 09:55 PM
I agree with Lin also - I couldn't have written down something I wasn't able to do at 275, because I had NO IDEA how much my weight was slowing me down.

Just to give an example: I thought I wasn't one of those people who could clean-as-you-go while cooking a meal, and have a relatively tidy kitchen that didn't look like a hurricane just swept through once the meal was ready. I thought it just wasn't me - a personality thing.

Turns out, the reason I couldn't do it was that when I was fat, I had to sit down and rest while I was cooking. If something needed to simmer or sauté for a few minutes, I was sitting down and resting. I didn't even realize. Now I can stay on my feet in the kitchen for as long as it takes to cook the meal, however elaborate. So I can cook more complicated things that require more juggling, and I can even do the cleanup in those down moments. No more resting needed.

Everyday chores are so much easier to do now - and since it's easier to do them every day, they don't get backed up and even more overwhelming.

Seriously: I had no idea how much my weight was slowing me down. I didn't know until I'd lost 80-100 pounds and started to feel like a completely different person. I, too, hope I never go back.

Steph7409
08-04-2012, 12:18 PM
Like lin, I thought I was doing pretty well for someone who weighed 225 - I walked, and lifted weights, and worked in my garden. Almost 90 pounds lighter, I still do all those things but they are so much more enjoyable! I find myself bouncing around in between sets of weight lifting, I often feel like breaking into a jog while I'm walking, and I can work in the garden all day without my back hurting.

I agree with kaplods that being fat isn't a moral failure, but I'm much happier now that I have more control over my eating. I've been a compulsive overeater since childhood and it made me feel bad about myself. When I'm being really honest about what prompted me to get serious about losing weight last summer, I say that I just got tired of doing things that made me hate myself.

DCHound
08-10-2012, 02:47 PM
Some things I remember about being 370 lbs:

-airplane seatbelts - just pretended to fasten them while basically holding my breath the entire flight so I wouldn't be squishing my seatmate
-how incredibly badly my feet hurt every morning when I got out of bed to limp to the bathroom
-taking baths instead of showers for years because I would get worn out standing in the shower long enough to wash my hair
-my hips being exactly as wide as my standard-sized bathtub – 1 more inch and I couldn’t have hit bottom
- being unable to walk up stairs without a lot of pain – going down required less effort, but the jolting often hurt more
- my legs being so fat and swollen they basically were the same circumference from ankle to above the knee
- my ankles being so fat and swollen my socks would leave huge indentations in my skin
- my feet being so wide I couldn’t wear Crocs which run wide
- my wrists being so fat I couldn’t wear a watch
- crying because the skin on my abdomen was literally full of open, weeping sores due to horrible yeast infections from size, skin stress, eating too much sugar and too many carbs, etc. – so painful
- never, ever dressing up, putting on makeup or doing my hair, because, what was the point (I thought) – I work sweatpants to work and everywhere else for several years
- not getting a haircut for over 5 years because what was the point
- basing part of my decision to adopt an older dog because they wouldn’t need much exercise
- getting in my car to go further than 1 block from home (and where I live is very walkable)
- paying an astronomical amount to drive to work in DC and park because I hated public transportation – hated standing when there were no seats, hated sitting and taking up more than half the seat…you name it
- refusing to eat in restaurants, only drive-thrus, because I felt like people were judging me for eating when I was size 32
- being unable to shop at Lane Bryant because I was 2 sizes larger than their biggest size
- hating to shop at Catherine’s because it was expensive, ugly, and the only store near me whose clothes I could fit into
- having no idea what my correct bra size was
- avoiding contact with friends and even some family members I hadn’t seen in years because I didn’t want them to know how fat I’d gotten (and that was one of the FIRST changes I made after I started this journey in 2008)
- missing my 20th high school reunion because I didn’t want them to see me like that
- having to ask the office manager at my former job to special-order me a size 5X t-shirt when she was buying custom t-shirts for our entire office…then it still being too small when it arrived (in retrospect, it ran small so it should have fit, but whatever)

I could go on for hours, but, suffice it to say, NONE of these apply any more except my ankles still swell a bit at the end of the day.

Riddy
08-10-2012, 11:07 PM
I just thought of another one -

When I drop something, picking it up off the floor no longer involves sound effects. :rofl:

toastedsmoke
08-11-2012, 09:24 AM
I think getting to Onederland has been the milestone I've felt "the most" about, and that felt great! Losing 100 lbs is also really awesome. I agree with those who say it doesn't fundamentally solve all your problems or make life perfect, but it has taught me a lot about myself and about self-acceptance. Before I thought "oh, I would be more beautiful or more outgoing or more flirty or more this or that" but I've found it's not really true.

I'm one of those whose weight didn't really inhibit me from physical activity (I started and finished C25k between the 240s and 220s and had previously gotten more than halfway even in the 260s). But I thought for example my shyness with the opposite sex was a function of my weight. I've found now it's not. I thought my mild social anxiety was weight-related, it's not. I've realized that everything that I thought was wrong with me because of my weight, really wasn't and I've learned more about myself and my strengths and weaknesses and things I want to work on as a result.

In a more obvious way, the things that are great about losing a 100 lbs apart from the life lessons/how it feels to lose the first 100 lbs are:

- The empowering feeling that you've got what it takes to make it to goal or really do anything you set your mind to.
- The awesomeness of shopping at regular stores and not being worried that something comes in my size. (Although wearing size 11 shoes, I still worry about that to an extent)>
- The loss of self-consciousness that everyone is staring and commenting whether or not they actually are.
- The increased ease of maintaining fitness- Whilst I wasn't THAT unfit, running is easier now carrying less weight than it was even in the 220s when I finished C25k).
- More confidence to experiment with my look. I recently chopped off all my hair (to about 2 inches in length). I love it, but I'd never have had the confidence to attempt it before even though I probably could have.
- Better health. My family struggles with blood pressure issues, and whilst mine is still on the high side of normal, it's much more consistent and much lower than it was before.
- Increased self-satisfaction. This is a funny one. I won't say losing weight has made me happier or made life perfect because it hasn't BUT I feel better that instead of just enduring something that made me unhappy, I stood up and did something about it. There's power in that knowledge. And I guess that is a lesson I should try to apply to other aspects of my my life. Not to fret and worry about things I CAN change, either change them or accept those aspects of myself and move on; stressing only paralyses a person and breeds more fretting and worrying and hopelessness.

I admit at 275 lbs, I thought 100 lbs less would make me like supermodel thin and princess perfect. It didn't. I am still myself. BUT I don't regret it for a second. The feeling of achievement you get is totally totally worth it. It's worth the effort and the sacrifice and the things you learn about yourself making this journey.

SayAnythingBut
08-14-2012, 11:51 PM
Some things I remember about being 370 lbs:

-airplane seatbelts - just pretended to fasten them while basically holding my breath the entire flight so I wouldn't be squishing my seatmate
-how incredibly badly my feet hurt every morning when I got out of bed to limp to the bathroom
-taking baths instead of showers for years because I would get worn out standing in the shower long enough to wash my hair
-my hips being exactly as wide as my standard-sized bathtub – 1 more inch and I couldn’t have hit bottom
- being unable to walk up stairs without a lot of pain – going down required less effort, but the jolting often hurt more
- my legs being so fat and swollen they basically were the same circumference from ankle to above the knee
- my ankles being so fat and swollen my socks would leave huge indentations in my skin
- my feet being so wide I couldn’t wear Crocs which run wide
- my wrists being so fat I couldn’t wear a watch
- crying because the skin on my abdomen was literally full of open, weeping sores due to horrible yeast infections from size, skin stress, eating too much sugar and too many carbs, etc. – so painful
- never, ever dressing up, putting on makeup or doing my hair, because, what was the point (I thought) – I work sweatpants to work and everywhere else for several years
- not getting a haircut for over 5 years because what was the point
- basing part of my decision to adopt an older dog because they wouldn’t need much exercise
- getting in my car to go further than 1 block from home (and where I live is very walkable)
- paying an astronomical amount to drive to work in DC and park because I hated public transportation – hated standing when there were no seats, hated sitting and taking up more than half the seat…you name it
- refusing to eat in restaurants, only drive-thrus, because I felt like people were judging me for eating when I was size 32
- being unable to shop at Lane Bryant because I was 2 sizes larger than their biggest size
- hating to shop at Catherine’s because it was expensive, ugly, and the only store near me whose clothes I could fit into
- having no idea what my correct bra size was
- avoiding contact with friends and even some family members I hadn’t seen in years because I didn’t want them to know how fat I’d gotten (and that was one of the FIRST changes I made after I started this journey in 2008)
- missing my 20th high school reunion because I didn’t want them to see me like that
- having to ask the office manager at my former job to special-order me a size 5X t-shirt when she was buying custom t-shirts for our entire office…then it still being too small when it arrived (in retrospect, it ran small so it should have fit, but whatever)

I could go on for hours, but, suffice it to say, NONE of these apply any more except my ankles still swell a bit at the end of the day.

Wish I could 'like' your comment or something!

SayAnythingBut
08-15-2012, 12:01 AM
I just thought of another one -

When I drop something, picking it up off the floor no longer involves sound effects. :rofl:

'Like' yours too, Riddy!

You know, I've not lost even close to 100 lbs, but even I can feel the effects of losing 36 lbs to a degree. The feeling bit is with my robe - it sinches all the way around me now! It's so roomy these days that I'll wear it just for fun sometimes. Also, I can now put my feet together properly without my thighs getting in the way terribly. Little things but they're nice.

MizMelis
08-16-2012, 11:08 PM
I'm nearly halfway to the first 100 lbs. Just 15 to go until i hit 50 lbs.
I'm excited, but at the same time I've been a bit hard on myself as to WHY i gained all that weight in the first place. When i think about it, I really shouldn't have, but obviously i did. I learned in the last 4 and 1/2 months that I'm an emotional eater and I was definitely a binge eater. I'm not sure what it's going to feel like to reach the first 100 lbs, but i do remember how it felt when i lost the very first 5. I had been talking to a good buddy of mine who had lost a significant amount of weight when i had first started my journey the first of April and i remember him telling me how proud he was of me.

My own mother would brush it off as it were nothing and i have this person telling me how proud they are of me that i lost 5 lbs. It was invigorating. So we talked about food and exercise and why i ate the way i did. I'm still unsure of why i let myself binge and get to the point where i was 270 lbs, but i'm learning that, that reason doesn't really matter anymore because the most important thing is that i am creating a more healthy lifestyle for myself and in turn teaching my son what a healthy lifestyle looks like. In 4 and 1/2 months i've lost 35 lbs and that good buddy of mine is still there cheering me on, my mother is now surprisingly telling me every so often how proud she is of my accomplishment so far.

Even after 35 lbs gone so far, things are so much easier and I can finally run and play with my son without getting as winded as i did just 4 months ago. I can just imagine how much more i'll be able to do when i lose the next 65.

I may not have a super amazing toned body once i reach the goal of 135-140, but i will be healthy... and I will be happy.

586
08-18-2012, 02:47 PM
Losing 100 pounds got me back to comfort.

All the usual "I lost weight and received these health benefits" applies but also:

I can sleep in my bed without having to readjust myself so I don't cut off my own breathing by the weight of my chest pushing down. I'm serious. I'd wake up feeling strangled due to my own body!

I fit in seats. I never thought I was one of THOSE people. I never thought, despite measurements, my hips and rear were so big they overflowed in standard seating. I got nervous on planes, sure, but no one ever complained and so what if I had to hold my breath and press into the fuselage so I'd be compact enough? Same thing with movie theater seats, stadiums, my car, restaurants... 100 pounds lighter and I will never take sitting down without getting pinned for granted again.

I can chase down a flyaway ball, lob it back to a stranger, and not break a sweat. 100 pounds ago, I would have let someone else retrieve that ball.

I lost all exercise inhibition. Running shorts and a tank top? Let's do it. Letting strangers see me work out? Right on. Popping into the store post-exercise in said shorts and top and not blinking an eye? Heck yeah. I used to toss on a blanket of clothing just to go outside, no matter the heat, because of my body shame. Its' not that 100 pounds got me back to some acceptable level, it's that I learned self-acceptance as I got to know my body again over 100 pounds loss. If I regain, I'll be in a better place to accept it as a challenge, not a defeat.

caryesings
08-18-2012, 08:20 PM
First, it turned back the clock plus some. The last time I was this weight was in my 20's. However to get to this weight I had to develop an exercise habit and now am more physically active than I was in my 20's.

Oddly, that wasn't something I was going for when I decided to lose the weight. But I did get everything that I had wanted out of losing weight. While I was quite content with my life prior to the weight loss, it has gotten infinitely better since.