Weight Loss Support - How do you lose the fat on your arms?




Bloopers
07-30-2012, 03:53 AM
My arms are my problem area. Whenever I lose weight, the fat comes off my waist/stomach area first. Not that I'm complaining, but not having skinny arms suck! I feel so bulky.. Like a man, because of my huge arms.

I hear lifting weight helps a lot.. But how many pounds should I be lifting? And if I don't lift at all, will my arms ever slim down from just dieting alone?


ValRock
07-30-2012, 03:57 AM
You can't spot reduce. Your body will lose fat from the places it feels like losing fat.

alitorry
07-30-2012, 05:28 AM
I'm so sorry, you sound like you have my problem :( I've always had big arms and now that I lost weight, they have slimmed a lot, but are still bulky. I do a lot of strength training and that makes my arms look better, but they still are big .. So I really know how you feel. I would suggest not heavy weights, but lighter and high reps for toning. Good luck!


LeilaJey
07-30-2012, 06:37 AM
What ValRock said! Everyone has their "problem" areas. For me it's my legs, and it sucks too but the weight will have to come off eventually. Although sometimes I fear I'll be a skeleton on top with big legs haha..hopefully not. Stick with it and keep measurements.

sontaikle
07-30-2012, 07:08 AM
Unfortunately as other posters have said: You can't say "alright fat from my arms, you are banished!" and wish for it to go away. It comes off when it wants to come off. Weight training will make sure that your arms look nice in the end and maybe make it so you get those nice arms a bit sooner than you would have otherwise.

I posted on my blog about this: http://healthplusfifty.wordpress.com/2012/07/19/why-women-should-lift-weights-part-1-arms/ and I say that it's diet that really got me the arms, even though weight training gave me the shape.

I didn't really lose the fat in my arms until I hit the 120s! It can take a long time if you happen to store fat there.

TheVikingNinja
07-30-2012, 07:19 AM
The best luck I've had with this is a combo of pushups (I do table top since my arms are still considerably weak) and those cheap free weights you can get at Ocean State. Just pick them up and see what the heaviest but comfotable weight for you is. To me the 1-5 lbs are too light and the 10+ are too heavy, so I have 8lb weights. Then just look up some exercises or just incorporate them into any cardio you already do. I hear wrist weights are good for this too since you don't have to hold anything, but I haven't tried them out yet.

sontaikle
07-30-2012, 08:37 AM
The best luck I've had with this is a combo of pushups (I do table top since my arms are still considerably weak) and those cheap free weights you can get at Ocean State. Just pick them up and see what the heaviest but comfotable weight for you is. To me the 1-5 lbs are too light and the 10+ are too heavy, so I have 8lb weights. Then just look up some exercises or just incorporate them into any cardio you already do. I hear wrist weights are good for this too since you don't have to hold anything, but I haven't tried them out yet.

Actually you're probably better off with the heavier stuff.

Jonsgurl0531
07-30-2012, 09:06 AM
sontaikle you give me hope that my arms will someday look normal! My arms are huge still compared to the rest of my body.

JossFit
07-30-2012, 12:41 PM
Actually you're probably better off with the heavier stuff.

Yep.

Lifting 8 pound weights isn't going to "tone" anything. Heck, I bet your purse weighs more than that.

Lifting weights is really only beneficial if you CHALLENGE yourself.

ValRock
07-30-2012, 12:45 PM
Yep.

Lifting 8 pound weights isn't going to "tone" anything. Heck, I bet your purse weighs more than that.

Lifting weights is really only beneficial if you CHALLENGE yourself.

Double ditto, all this!!

Dragonfly33
07-30-2012, 02:23 PM
Lifting weights wil tone what's underneath so when the fat goes, your arms look good. I will be lifting heavy eventually and my trainer knows this! I am only at 7.5lbs on each arm and I am finding it too easy now so I believe I will be moving to 10lbs soon.

ValRock
07-30-2012, 02:27 PM
Lift heavier girls!!!

C'mon now, push yourselves!!!

mimsyborogoves
07-30-2012, 02:35 PM
You say "lift heavy", but how heavy are you supposed to lift? This is where I get confused. I do the machines because the free weights intimidate me, but I always have a hard time deciding if what I'm lifting is too easy or too heavy. I don't wanna hurt myself, but I don't want to be jipping myself either.

ValRock
07-30-2012, 02:44 PM
You say "lift heavy", but how heavy are you supposed to lift? This is where I get confused. I do the machines because the free weights intimidate me, but I always have a hard time deciding if what I'm lifting is too easy or too heavy. I don't wanna hurt myself, but I don't want to be jipping myself either.

If you can lift it 6 times with good form. Lift it. If I can lift something 10 times with good form, it's too light.

You seriously won't get anywhere swinging 8lb. weights around.

How much you should lift depends on which exercise you're doing.

Dragonfly33
07-30-2012, 03:00 PM
ValRock: Thank you for your response! I know at first 7.5lbs was hard for me to do 10 reps and now it is too easy. I went from a zero activity lifestyle to exercising 6 days a week so my strength is slowly increasing.

JossFit
07-30-2012, 03:15 PM
Yeah, "heavy" is a completely relative term, but it basically means that you should feel muscle fatigue around 8 reps or so with perfect form. You *could* push out a couple more, but might risk sacrificing your form.

If by 8-10 reps you aren't struggling with it you need to go heavier.

Val and I differ somewhat in our numbers, but the concept is the same. I base mine off of the belief that;

- Lifting as heavy as you can with fatigue at 5-8 reps = training for strength and power
- Lifting as heavy as you can with fatigue at 10-12 reps = training for maximum muscle hypertrophy (AKA Size)
- Lifting as heavy as you can with fatigue at 15 or more reps = training for muscular endurance

So, if you want to get stronger, keep the weight heavy and the reps low. If you want muscle growth, aim for the 10-12 rep range, and if you want muscular endurance (read: not "TONE" or whatever crap Shape magazine tells you) lifting in the 15+ rep range will get you there.

"Tone" will come from building muscle by lifing heavy, eating sufficient calories, and buring enough fat to show off the muscle.

stephaniegee
07-30-2012, 05:02 PM
"Tone" will come from building muscle by lifing heavy, eating sufficient calories, and buring enough fat to show off the muscle.

Just wanted to ask a question about this. Is there anyway of knowing what amount of calories is 'sufficient' to gain muscle? Or is it just by a trial and error sort of thing [finding out what works for you personally and what doesn't]? I'd like to gain muscle in my butt and legs, which I know are pretty difficult areas as opposed to the arms. What kind of diet works best with gaining muscle? I know you need lots of protein, but what about fat? Carbs? How can I find the balance of all these things while managing losing weight as well? Sorry to ask so many questions! But you seem very knowledgeable about lifting and I just wanted to get an idea..

DietVet
07-30-2012, 08:33 PM
The girls above are right on: you have to lift heavy to grow your muscles. "Toning" is not a real thing. The other thing that is important, however, are the exercises you are doing. Probably you don't need to do bicep curls or tricep extensions: instead you should be doing dumbbell presses--standing up and at an incline, and rows of various kinds. These are exercises for which you will want to use heavier weights. Any 7 year old can press 8lb. Compound exercises with heavy weights. Do it and have fun!

DietVet
07-30-2012, 08:36 PM
Just wanted to ask a question about this. Is there anyway of knowing what amount of calories is 'sufficient' to gain muscle? Or is it just by a trial and error sort of thing [finding out what works for you personally and what doesn't]? I'd like to gain muscle in my butt and legs, which I know are pretty difficult areas as opposed to the arms. What kind of diet works best with gaining muscle? I know you need lots of protein, but what about fat? Carbs? How can I find the balance of all these things while managing losing weight as well? Sorry to ask so many questions! But you seem very knowledgeable about lifting and I just wanted to get an idea..


It's tricky. The thing is that building muscle requires a calorie surplus: growing muscle = gaining weight (but muscle, not fat). Eating a diet high in lean proteins and veggies will help with this. HOWEVER, it does seem that if you eat a little below maintenance (again, lots of lean protein, veggies, and healthy fats) and take up weight lifting as a novice, you can achieve the miraculous: gaining muscle and strength while losing fat. For you, keep your calories moderately low (300 or so below maintenance--trial and error here) and train smart. You should be able to accomplish strength increases and muscle maintenance while still losing fat and 'weight'.

JossFit
07-30-2012, 09:13 PM
It's tricky. The thing is that building muscle requires a calorie surplus: growing muscle = gaining weight (but muscle, not fat). Eating a diet high in lean proteins and veggies will help with this. HOWEVER, it does seem that if you eat a little below maintenance (again, lots of lean protein, veggies, and healthy fats) and take up weight lifting as a novice, you can achieve the miraculous: gaining muscle and strength while losing fat. For you, keep your calories moderately low (300 or so below maintenance--trial and error here) and train smart. You should be able to accomplish strength increases and muscle maintenance while still losing fat and 'weight'.

Yep, newbie gains... take advantage of it! I say start lifting heavy and slowly add calories (200 increase per day each week) and keep evaluating. Use pictures, measurements and the scale. If you gain too much and it appears to be fat, back off a bit and let it level out.

TheRainFalls
07-30-2012, 09:53 PM
I know how you feel. Everything seems smaller but my arms. I feel like I look like a non muscular Popeye lol.

mimsyborogoves
08-02-2012, 11:04 PM
Yeah, "heavy" is a completely relative term, but it basically means that you should feel muscle fatigue around 8 reps or so with perfect form. You *could* push out a couple more, but might risk sacrificing your form.

If by 8-10 reps you aren't struggling with it you need to go heavier.

Val and I differ somewhat in our numbers, but the concept is the same. I base mine off of the belief that;

- Lifting as heavy as you can with fatigue at 5-8 reps = training for strength and power
- Lifting as heavy as you can with fatigue at 10-12 reps = training for maximum muscle hypertrophy (AKA Size)
- Lifting as heavy as you can with fatigue at 15 or more reps = training for muscular endurance

So, if you want to get stronger, keep the weight heavy and the reps low. If you want muscle growth, aim for the 10-12 rep range, and if you want muscular endurance (read: not "TONE" or whatever crap Shape magazine tells you) lifting in the 15+ rep range will get you there.

"Tone" will come from building muscle by lifing heavy, eating sufficient calories, and buring enough fat to show off the muscle.

So, if I'm wanting to build muscle, how many SETS of 10-12 reps do I do? Does it matter?

JohnP
08-02-2012, 11:33 PM
So, if I'm wanting to build muscle, how many SETS of 10-12 reps do I do? Does it matter?

Good rules of thumbs for beginners. This is just my opinion on the best way for a beginner who is primarily interested in fat loss and bodycomposition.

1) Do compound exercises only.

2) Do a full body routine 3x a week.

3) Do 10-12 reps with only 2 sets. Seems like a small amount but as a beginner you only need a small amount.

4) Start LIGHT and focus on form. It should be quite easy for the first week or so. If you're having any difficulty with the amount of weight you're using in the first week you started too heavy. The first week should not be any kind of struggle.

5) Increase your weight every workout by the smallest amount possible. In week two it still shouldn't be difficult but by week three it should be at least somewhat of a struggle and by week four it should be. You should be carrying around a clipboard at the gym for the first several months at least.

After 2-3 months you'll be lifting much heavier weights than you ever thought possible and you'll look completely different in the mirror. At that point you will need to do more sets per workout but hit each body part fewer times per week.

Think of it like this. You want to get a nice tan you don't go lay in the sun for a couple hours when you're white and pale. Likewise you don't go into a weight room and beat your body up to the point it can't recover. Build up your strenght and work capacity in the first 2-3 months and then you can switch to a more robust routine.

The primary thing to learn as a beginner is proper form so when the weights get heavy you don't injure yourself.

Bloopers
08-03-2012, 09:52 PM
Learned a great deal in this thread. Thanks everyone (:

vjykmr89
08-04-2012, 01:51 AM
i dont think u can get rid of it in just your arms. main thing is just take up healthy habits, and plus you are only 14, and younger dudes naturally tend to have a little more fat than older ones sometimes... so dont worry
:tantrum:

fresh15again
08-05-2012, 11:55 PM
Wow I learned so much. So many knowledgeable people here. I appreciate all the info. I had to google compound exercises but found some clear examples. I have been saying for years (even when I'm at a goal weight) that I don't like my big arms. I realize I have to do something about it to actually make a difference. Diet alone won't make me like the look of my arms or help me do pushups.

Bloopers
08-06-2012, 02:55 AM
i dont think u can get rid of it in just your arms. main thing is just take up healthy habits, and plus you are only 14, and younger dudes naturally tend to have a little more fat than older ones sometimes... so dont worry
:tantrum:

um, you're not talking to me, are you? LOL. cause I'm neither 14 nor a 'dude' LOL.

mirax3
08-06-2012, 04:07 AM
Lifting 8 pound weights isn't going to "tone" anything. Heck, I bet your purse weighs more than that.

Lifting weights is really only beneficial if you CHALLENGE yourself.

Yes! Why waste your time... if small weights could help me tone I would carry my purse around the mall and call it weight training.

Lift heavy!!! And if one more person tells me that I should "ease up" on the weights for fear that I might look "bulky", I swear to God... :D

sontaikle
08-06-2012, 07:55 AM
Lift heavy!!! And if one more person tells me that I should "ease up" on the weights for fear that I might look "bulky", I swear to God... :D

Get strong and punch those people in the face. ;)

Ok, I'm joking, but I know how you feel. It's been almost a year since I went super serious with the weight training and I'm glad to say the comments have pretty much stopped. Everyone around me realizes that I'm not going to get bulky lifting weights and instead they're all starting the do the same. :dizzy:

Even if I was going to bulk up, why would it matter? :?:

ValRock
08-06-2012, 10:48 AM
Get strong and punch those people in the face. ;)

Ok, I'm joking, but I know how you feel. It's been almost a year since I went super serious with the weight training and I'm glad to say the comments have pretty much stopped. Everyone around me realizes that I'm not going to get bulky lifting weights and instead they're all starting the do the same. :dizzy:

Even if I was going to bulk up, why would it matter? :?:

Exactly!! I have people telling me I look skinny, lately. I say "Oh, that's funny... because a year ago you were worried I'd look too bulky." They say, "you're still lifting?!" Uhm Yes. :dizzy: