Weight Loss Support - Has anyone's food addiction gone away with the weight???




GotothegymOKAY
07-22-2012, 11:02 PM
I have lost a lot of weight and I definitely consider myself "thin and normal" looking. But sadly (though visibly, people would never guess it) I still have a full blown binge eating disorder, and I'm still totally capable of, lets say, eating five more dinners. (It's 10 PM).

I was talking to some friends about this Mexican restaurant with burrito bowls and the girls were saying how they love it because they can make theirs last for "lunch for 3 days." I eat mine in one sitting. Even though I'm as thin as them now, it still gets to me that I'll never see food as unimportant as they do.

But has anyone fixed their mental addiction along with the physical weight aspect? I wonder if it ever really does go away.........


angie7896
07-22-2012, 11:07 PM
You are definitely not alone in feeling that way. I think food is going to be a struggle forever for me. I would love it if it were an unimportant part of my life but I just don't see that happening. I feel I am better equipped to deal with it after my weight loss, but the addiction is still there.

Maybe others have experienced something different?

alaskanlaughter
07-22-2012, 11:20 PM
You are definitely not alone in feeling that way. I think food is going to be a struggle forever for me. I would love it if it were an unimportant part of my life but I just don't see that happening. I feel I am better equipped to deal with it after my weight loss, but the addiction is still there.

Maybe others have experienced something different?

this, exactly....while over the course of some weight loss i've developed tools to help deal with my struggles with sugar, food, overeating etc, i think i will always have that "addiction" there...part of me wonders if it's biological because my sister is addicted to alcohol...makes me wonder if i got the "addicted to food" part of the genetics...but honestly i expect to always struggle with it, and i'm okay with that knowledge


Candeka
07-23-2012, 01:16 AM
It hasn't gone away from me. I went from 165 down to 141. However, within the past 2 months I have shot back up to 149 due to losing the will power to just say "no" to the mass amount of cravings and the never ending black hole of a stomach. I stayed with my friend a month ago and was shocked at how she only ate breakfast, lunch and dinner. The entire week I was there I felt like I was starving since I am so used to snacking ALL day. From talking to others who have lost weight, it seems like in most cases it is a life long battle.

HungryHungryHippo
07-23-2012, 01:19 AM
Yep, I'm there with you, sistah!

ValRock
07-23-2012, 02:28 AM
It takes time. I can confidently say, that after 8 years of working at this, I have my eating 85% under control. You just have to keep at it. All the changes add up and become your new normal, over time. Hang in there!!! NEVER give up.

Arctic Mama
07-23-2012, 03:22 AM
It gets easier with time and habit, but it never goes away completely, as far as I can tell. However being vigilant allows me to mitigate any damage of a slip much faster than I could before, and that means I can maintain even when I'm not always at the top of my game regarding food or activity.

It is far from hopeless.

Misa66
07-23-2012, 05:18 AM
Short answer, no.

Ugh I wish it would though! I still find myself bingeing some days and loving every minute of it until I wake up (I usually do it before I fall asleep, terrible I know) and think of all the food I ate and feel like doodoo :/ but the good thing is I don't only feel bad because I know I shouldn't have eaten it, but the junk food actually makes me feel pretty terrible now. I still love every single bite but I can't eat nearly as much of it as I used to which is the good news :) it will always be a struggle for us who love food but we have to learn self control

IsobelRose22
07-23-2012, 06:44 AM
I totally understand! Its such a hard thing to beat. i'd definitely class it as an addiction.

Personally I have my eating under control as long as I keep busy. While i'm with friends/family/boyfriend, at work. The second I'm at a loose end, while watching tv, or if I'm on my own at home it becomes so, so hard for me to control my cravings. You should see the mental battle I have with myself! lol Even exercise doesn't really help at those moments. To help curb my cravings, I drink a lot of black tea with calorie free sweetener, water, and I have, mini milks (Ice cream lollies 30cals) crackerbread (16 cals) and salsa, strawberries and raspberries in stock if I have to eat something lol. at least if I binge on that it's not going to break the calorie bank too badly.

kelly315
07-23-2012, 07:03 AM
I neglected to take care of the mental/emotional side of weight loss and BED last time around, and I gained it all back- all 125 pounds I lost, plus two extra. From what I've heard, weight loss without proper counseling can often exacerbate the eating issues in the long run. There's really no substitute for taking the time to sit down and talk to a professional who knows how to help you.

MyLilSweetPeas
07-23-2012, 12:07 PM
I know what you mean! I love delicious food! There have been times that I could eat more in one sitting than my husband! I think it will be something I have to work on for the rest of my life. I will say though, I have been counting calories for a few weeks now and it has made me realize how many calories I was consuming before I started. I wish that I had tracked the calories a day or two before I started my plan because I now don't want to go back to eating the way that I was just see how much it was. I can guess that it was probably between 3000-4000 a day. I usually never ate breakfast but I would have lunch, dinner and snack in between. It was stuff like I would feed the kids and big portioned meals at dinner. Last time I made a trip to the grocery store I looked at Marie Calendars chicken pot pie to see how many calories was in it. I was surprised to see it had over 600 in the regular size pie. In one sitting, I could eat 2 of those pies over white rice. That's well over 1200 calories in one meal so add the lunch meal and snacks to that. Yes, I was consuming a lot of food! I am a girl of the South and I good home cooked meal with family has always been my thing. Food was a very good friend / enemy of mine. I just didn't realize. So, I will have to really work at it the rest of my life to make good choices. There will always be temptation but I will always have a choice. There will be times I don't do so good but hopefully most times I will make the better choice. You have really done great with your weight loss!

Steph7409
07-23-2012, 12:25 PM
I wish! I think of it as more of a compulsion than an addiction. My life used to revolve around food, with most of my plans being about what I was going to buy or cook to eat. Not so much these days, but it's still a struggle. I fight the obsessive thoughts pretty much every day.

Beach Patrol
07-23-2012, 02:51 PM
It hasn't gone away from me. I went from 165 down to 141. However, within the past 2 months I have shot back up to 149 due to losing the will power to just say "no" to the mass amount of cravings and the never ending black hole of a stomach.
...it seems like in most cases it is a life long battle.

THIS.

I was 192 at my highest weight. I've lost 39 lbs, but recently gained 5 lbs and then there's that 2-3 lb "bounce" that I get at TOM every month. Sigh. And my problem? I JUST LOVE FOOD. And when something tastes really, really good, I just want it & want it & want it... and have it & have it & have it... and hey, sometimes I eat until I am literally physically sick of a food. I don't think it will ever go away for me, either.

Yup. "life long battle". :^:

kaplods
07-23-2012, 03:25 PM
For decades, I believed that my "food addiction" was a mental thing. Something was inherently WRONG with me. I was lazy, crazy, or stupid.

Then I started thinking maybe things weren't that simple. My worst binges were always during PMS/TOM week. When I reluctantly started taking birth control in my late-20's (I'd put it off as long as possible, because of the risk of weight gain) and stopped dieting, my weight gain stopped - but I couldn't seem to LOSE any weight.

Then I read David Kessler's book, The End of Overeating as well as various low-carb, slow-carb, good-carb, and paleo/primal books, and I realized that I didn't have a mental food-addiction, I had a physiological carb-addiction, especially to the carby/fatty/salty combination David Kessler talks about.

When I eat below a certain carb-threshold, not only do I lose weight, I don't have the compulsion to binge. I still have to pay attention to what I eat, but I don't have to use absolutely every bit of my mental and physical fortitude to implement white-knuckled, tooth-and-nail willpower. I have to THINK, but I don't have to OBSESS. I have to use will, but not willpower.

Though TOM/PMS is still tough, it's now more purgatory than ****.


Unfortunately the "addiction" isn't cured, it's just in remission. While I'm not tempted to binge when I'm eating RIGHT, if I eat foods that are too high in carb, or that contain the sweet/salty/creamy flavor of foods that combine carbs, fat, and salt, the cravings are back full-force.

If I avoid most high-carb foods, especially the ones that are also high in fat and salt, I can maintain my remission for the most part. I still have to exert common sense and portion control, but I don't eat "crazy."

Even though it's not a cure, it still seems a miracle to me. It's like a lap-band commercial a few years ago in which a woman talks about the surgery turning her hunger from a lion walking around her house with a nametag that reads "hunger" to an orange tom cat sitting on her lap.

That's exactly how I feel paleo eating (and birth control) has done for me.

Although my natural hunger makes the lion look like a pussy cat. My natural hunger wasn't just a lion, it was more like a rabid t-rex.

Birth control turned the rabid t-rex into a rabid lion. Eating a whole-foods, South Beach style diet turned the rabid lion into a normal lion. Paleo eating turned the lion into a feral cat (still not tame).

My hunger may never be a lap cat. I may always have to work to keep my hunger under control, but not having to fight tooth-and-nail has been an absolute godsend.

I finally feel (at least almost) like a normal person. I used to think there had to be something seriously and majorly defectively wrong with me. Now I realize it wasn't me, it was the food I was trying to use as fuel.

For many years even the "professionals' thought obesity was largely a mental problem, and more and more research is suggesting it's a physiological one. Changeing the food can change the addiction.

It is hard though to overcome the SOCIAL "need" for certain foods. I KNOW that I do not need pastries or chips or any non-paleo foods, but sometimes I feel that I do, because all of the carb-pushing that friends and family do.

Did you ever notice that no one ever pushes BROCCOLI on you? Or fish and lean meat? If it's remotely healthful, no one tries to force it down your throat. It's usually only junk (sometimes expensive junk, but junk nonetheless).

ringmaster
07-23-2012, 03:41 PM
it's often said maintaining is harder than losing :)

I wonder, how many people that truly struggle were overweight as kids? my theory is it's harder if you were overweight as a kid since you picked up those habits then.

ghost
07-23-2012, 03:57 PM
For decades, I believed that my "food addiction" was a mental thing. Something was inherently WRONG with me. I was lazy, crazy, or stupid.

Then I started thinking maybe things weren't that simple. My worst binges were always during PMS/TOM week. When I reluctantly started taking birth control in my late-20's (I'd put it off as long as possible, because of the risk of weight gain) and stopped dieting, my weight gain stopped - but I couldn't seem to LOSE any weight.

Then I read David Kessler's book, The End of Overeating as well as various low-carb, slow-carb, good-carb, and paleo/primal books, and I realized that I didn't have a mental food-addiction, I had a physiological carb-addiction, especially to the carby/fatty/salty combination David Kessler talks about.

When I eat below a certain carb-threshold, not only do I lose weight, I don't have the compulsion to binge. I still have to pay attention to what I eat, but I don't have to use absolutely every bit of my mental and physical fortitude to implement white-knuckled, tooth-and-nail willpower. I have to THINK, but I don't have to OBSESS. I have to use will, but not willpower.

Though TOM/PMS is still tough, it's now more purgatory than ****.


Unfortunately the "addiction" isn't cured, it's just in remission. While I'm not tempted to binge when I'm eating RIGHT, if I eat foods that are too high in carb, or that contain the sweet/salty/creamy flavor of foods that combine carbs, fat, and salt, the cravings are back full-force.

If I avoid most high-carb foods, especially the ones that are also high in fat and salt, I can maintain my remission for the most part. I still have to exert common sense and portion control, but I don't eat "crazy."

Even though it's not a cure, it still seems a miracle to me. It's like a lap-band commercial a few years ago in which a woman talks about the surgery turning her hunger from a lion walking around her house with a nametag that reads "hunger" to an orange tom cat sitting on her lap.

That's exactly how I feel paleo eating (and birth control) has done for me.

Although my natural hunger makes the lion look like a kitty cat. My natural hunger wasn't just a lion, it was more like a rabid t-rex.

Birth control turned the rabid t-rex into a rabid lion. Eating a whole-foods, South Beach style diet turned the rabid lion into a normal lion. Paleo eating turned the lion into a feral cat (still not tame).

My hunger may never be a lap cat. I may always have to work to keep my hunger under control, but not having to fight tooth-and-nail has been an absolute godsend.

I finally feel (at least almost) like a normal person. I used to think there had to be something seriously and majorly defectively wrong with me. Now I realize it wasn't me, it was the food I was trying to use as fuel.

For many years even the "professionals' thought obesity was largely a mental problem, and more and more research is suggesting it's a physiological one. Changeing the food can change the addiction.

It is hard though to overcome the SOCIAL "need" for certain foods. I KNOW that I do not need pastries or chips or any non-paleo foods, but sometimes I feel that I do, because all of the carb-pushing that friends and family do.

Did you ever notice that no one ever pushes BROCCOLI on you? Or fish and lean meat? If it's remotely healthful, no one tries to force it down your throat. It's usually only junk (sometimes expensive junk, but junk nonetheless).

This. This is exactly the experience I have. Eating primal/low carb has really helped my food addictions. I realize now that the sugar/insulin response in my body was driving a lot of my compulsive over-eating behaviors. I'm much more satiated now, and can go for hours without thinking about food instead of obsessing about what/when/where my next meal will come from. I no longer panic if I don't have food and I don't get that super low blood sugar nausea feeling I used to get every time I skipped a meal.

It might now be everyones experience, but it rings so true to me. I also figured this out with the help of David Kessler, Dr. William Davis' Wheat Belly and of course my favorite Gary Taubes.

Arctic Mama
07-23-2012, 04:40 PM
it's often said maintaining is harder than losing :)

I wonder, how many people that truly struggle were overweight as kids? my theory is it's harder if you were overweight as a kid since you picked up those habits then.

Oh I don't know. I've been fat in varying degrees my whole life, including being a pudgy grade schooler. It is still controllable to a very large degree and not even a massive struggle, but it does require commitment, vigilance, and a refusal to slide back into old habits. New habits MUST be created or you'll end up right back where you were.

But it's not significantly more difficult for those with lifelong habit issues than newer problems, from all I have seen. Both groups have to make a change and stick with it, and that requires the same commitment regardless of how far they had to journey to get to where they are now.

freelancemomma
07-23-2012, 04:44 PM
Has anyone fixed their mental addiction along with the physical weight aspect? I wonder if it ever really does go away.........

Like you, I still have a large appetite. I still can (and occasionally do) consume 4,000+ calories in one sitting. That said, I feel that some of my compulsiveness around eating has subsided. I no longer plan binges the way I used to. And the way I look at it, there's an upside to viewing food as important: it means we have one more source of pleasure in life, which the eat-to-live folks don't get to experience.

F.

freelancemomma
07-23-2012, 04:48 PM
Kaplods, your posts are always so well reasoned. Love the feline analogy.

F.

lin43
07-23-2012, 05:01 PM
it's often said maintaining is harder than losing :)

I wonder, how many people that truly struggle were overweight as kids? my theory is it's harder if you were overweight as a kid since you picked up those habits then.

Neither of these are true for me. I am finding maintaining difficult, but not necessarily harder than losing. Perhaps that's because I didn't weigh myself during my weight-loss mode, so I wasn't obsessed with the high that usually comes with seeing those numbers go down on the scale (fitting into lower-sized clothing is nice, but it takes more time, so the weekly reward isn't there). On maintenance, I get to eat more, so that's what makes it nicer than losing. Of course, I've only been maintaining since November, so time will tell.

As for the childhood thing, I was a thin kid---so much so that my mother took me to the doctor in concern. Even though in my teenage years I went on some stupid diets because that's what everybody else was doing, I really wasn't fat or even obsessed with food. I loved food, but I didn't obsess over it. For me, life in my adult years has never been as happy as my younger years were, and eating has become a source of pleasure that substitutes for that void.

And the way I look at it, there's an upside to viewing food as important: it means we have one more source of pleasure in life, which the eat-to-live folks don't get to experience.


I agree. I've tried intuitive eating in the past, but one of the reasons it never worked for me is that I realized I didn't want to relegate food to just "necessity" or eating purely from hunger. I also realized that at certain times, I like that full feeling (not the "I-feel-sick" feeling, but just that full feeling). I respect those who are successful at intuitive eating, but I know that I'll probably never be one of them.

Prim2012
07-23-2012, 07:33 PM
Definitely not but some cravings may go away like my soda addiction (I rarely have this a few times a year, just don't think about it). Growing up everyone in my immediate family on both sides (parents, siblings, grandparents, aunts, uncles) needed to lose 50+ pounds (a few of these 100+ pounds) so I'm convinced that you can be genetically more proned to being addictive to food and being overweight. Not an excuse, I just know some of us will be more challenged with this than others. I find planning ahead and keeping a healthy snack in my arsenal keeps me from getting too out of control on most occassions but I can eat a lot, more than most!

Only Me
07-23-2012, 07:49 PM
But has anyone fixed their mental addiction along with the physical weight aspect? I wonder if it ever really does go away.........

It has never gone away for me, not when I lost 40lbs before getting pregnant with dd3, not in the years after she was born when I lost most of the pregnancy weight and then started climbing back up almost to where I was when 9 months pregnant with her, and not now that I'm back down around my pre-last pregnancy weight.

I have two problems. One is that I just love making and eating food, not always healthy food, but even with healthy food I want to eat too much for me. The other is occasional binges where I feel out of control and barely even taste the food I'm shoving down my throat (I can't really call it eating).

Neither has ever gone away and I've fought both since around puberty.

At any rate, I think I have finally come to accept that I will always have to be aware of what I'm eating and how much, and balance heavier food days with lighter food days. I need the scale and my clothes as constant reminders of where I am with food this week.

Amarantha2
07-23-2012, 07:56 PM
I don't consider my love of food as an addiction, but that's just me about me. :)

I do love food and that is the reason I gained more than 100 pounds decades ago. I lost the weight except for smaller rebounds that I then deal with as they happen but I have been pretty successful in keeping out of obesity for almost 20 years now.

But no, my love of food has never gone away. I think I am a "supertaster" and just really enjoy food and sometimes eat too much whether it be healthy food or junk food. But it is not an addiction for me.

bellona
07-23-2012, 08:38 PM
I have actually kicked the whole binge eating habit. Somedays I do eat too much or more than usual, but it is never to the point of a "binge" like it used to be. I haven't had a real binge since about 2 years ago.

I guess like others have said, it's hard to eat as much food as I used to. Plus I've gotten more picky about quality/taste than I have ever been. I blame that partly on reading French Women Don't Get Fat and splurging on the good stuff (chocolate, cheese, etc.) when I absolutely need something. Not only is good chocolate expensive, it's really satisfying. I would inhale Twix/Kit Kat bars but the more expensive dark chocolate I end up only eating a few squares. Same goes with cheese. I use a lot of principles from that book, such as only eating 3 meals a day, too. I do sometimes go back to 5 small meals a day with lots of protein, which works GREAT but I can't always do that long term.

It sort of changed my attitude from loving everything and anything to being a bit of a food snob. It's actually helped quite a bit.

maezy1
07-23-2012, 09:41 PM
Yall have made me feel so much better. My food addiction gets the best of me many times. recently (the past 9 months) I have made tremendous stress in my life and the addiction has been so hard to control. I feel better now that I can exercise regularly again but I still deal with the food addiction every day. I believe it will be a life long issue for me but I am determined to be in control of it more than it is in control of me

caramelkitty
07-24-2012, 12:35 AM
The love for food is there and probably don't want it to leave either, but I am not able to eat like I used to. my stomach just can't take it, though my brain wants it. gimme a burger ill wanna devour it, but 3/4 in and I'm stuffed. I know everyone is different but I now eat because I know I have to not because I want to. :) hang in there, love!

swissy
07-24-2012, 05:39 AM
Eating well isnt a problem for me its not using food as a substance to zone out, feel love, enjoyment.. a distraction.

It still creeps in once a week but I am managing those foods and trying to use portion control, sometimes you will say ah fck it but the difference is that you can let it be one meal and move on rather than a number of months before you move on and repeat the cycle.

CBT definatly helped, being honest about it and not thinking this is just the way I am I "can't" change.

carpediem
07-24-2012, 06:37 AM
I think it is very important during the weight loss proccess to think about what are your strengths and weaknesses regarding nutrition. It is a proccess to know yourself and try to decipher how your body works and what is asking you to eat at certain points.

In my experience I think I know myself better having thought about all this and I should be a successful maintainer 100% of the time. However I have found that there are periods where maintaining is very easy, everything runs smoothly, I can control all the variables and things look as if you never had a problem with your weight. These are the moments when you come to 3fc and try to encourage everybody and tell them that everyhing is possible.

But there are times when something changes and you cannot control everything around you and you have to start making smart choices out of the limited choices you have. And probably during these times you start feeling more stressed and the demons start appearing again. These are the critical moments when your knowledge about your weaknesses and how your body works should help you to overcome past conforting habits.

So I would say that you will probably encounter times when you will not think about your addictions and things will be fine, but you will probably have to be vigilant for the rest of your life.

Breannaj1215
07-24-2012, 07:32 AM
I know in my experience that if im really hungry i binge.so I dont let myself get that hungry. Up your calories. This isnt about losing weight as fast as u can. its about losing at a pace where u wont gain it back. Everyone would love to lose a lb a day but its just not reality. So pull your pants up and keep moving hunni. Take it one day at a time. It will get better!! I myself have a food issue. I used to love to feel full and eat yummy foods but I wana love being thin more.

PinkLotus
07-24-2012, 07:40 PM
Nope. :( And short of therapy (which I actually hope to do at some point, but can't afford it right now) I have no idea HOW.
I'm an emotional eater, a stress eater, somewhat of a binge eater, and I use food as comfort. I absolutely love all kinds of junky foods, and, while I've been really good at resisting them when I'm on plan, I find myself powerless to stop myself from eating ridiculous amounts of it when I'm off plan (cheat day). It's a never ending battle, and some days I feel completely hopeless.

ValRock
07-24-2012, 08:07 PM
The key is to replace emotional eating with something else. Don't medicate your pain with food.

I take out my anger on the gym (weightlifting). I drown my sorrows in warm tea. I kill boredom with something that keeps my hands busy.

If you do it long enough... you won't want to turn to food anymore. It's going to be dang uncomfortable at first. You have to learn to FEEL emotions and work through them. But, eventually, it gets better.

Hang in there!

Arctic Mama
07-24-2012, 08:32 PM
So true, Val nailed it. Feeling things is uncomfortable and hard and it isn't automatic for those of us who have emotionally ate for years. It it does get more automatic with time. I used to think 'intuitive' eating was impossible for me, because I was always 'hungry' and couldnt recognize my signals at all. And then I started assessing each urge bit by bit and discovered many times I would have reached for food in the past were now not needing food at all - I needed a hug, a distraction, some sleep, you name it.

Only when I get that belly quivering, urgent hunger that is obviously physiological in nature do I seek to eat - that's my goal. It is getting better and better, even though I have only recently abandoned calorie counts for satiety tracking. The more you do it the easier it becomes. That doesn't mean the urges fully disappear, but you become able to handle them without food.

wiseheart
07-24-2012, 08:35 PM
After I lost the weight I figured out that I would have to lose the food addiction as well and found a lot of ways to do that from brain chemistry re-balancing to obsessive relaxing. You can be free of food addiction, these days I see people losing the food addiction then the weight. Probably would have been easier.
I have maintained well over 100lbs of weight loss for over 20 years and get more ease with eating every day. Hang in I found guidance in the most surprising places as I just asked and listened.

memememe76
07-24-2012, 10:48 PM
I think it is very important during the weight loss proccess to think about what are your strengths and weaknesses regarding nutrition. It is a proccess to know yourself and try to decipher how your body works and what is asking you to eat at certain points.

Excellent point. There is often a lot of judgement in how people lose weight. It seems people should not only lose the weight, but they have to lose it in a certain way (ya know, eat small meals throughout the day, lose weight slowly, don't do fad diets, don't do surgery, eat breakfast, don't eat after 8pm, exercise in the morning, and always lift weights). It is a lifestyle change, but each person's life is still different.

Just because you lose the weight does not mean you no longer experience problems or issues (internal or external) in your life. Life can/will still be darn hard. But hopefully along the way, you have learned some tools to help deal with those issues more easily.

Also, just because one weighs more does not mean they are addicted to food. People gain weight for a lot of reasons, so when they lose the weight, certain issues that other maintainers experience may not apply to them.

For myself, I will forever have to be vigilant with what I eat and how much I eat. But I'm okay with that. After coming from a family reunion where my so-called "naturally skinny" were also watching how much they ate, I came to realize that this issue is not the domain of the obese/formerly obese.

Elsewhere is Fine
07-24-2012, 11:54 PM
I've only changed to healthy eating the past 4 months, but so far, no luck. The cravings are still there. There's just so much good (but unhealthy) food out there.

I DO see a difference when I eat things now though. I'll crave some junk food, get a bag of it, and try to eat it then find that I don't want to eat any of it after a bite or two even though I thought that I did. This happens when I go out to eat as well. I'll want a bite of everything that's served, but I don't feel like stuffing myself with anything anymore.

I still crave for everything that I used to crave for just as often, but my new eating habits are kicking in to help me out.

TiffNeedsChange
07-25-2012, 12:25 AM
I am 100% with kaplods.
When I was losing weight by only counting calories I was RAVENOUS all of the time.. since starting Atkins I have a sense of freedom from my hunger demon, no more bingeing. I still crave the things that I like and used to eat but saying no is 100 times easier on low carb. I am thrilled that I decided to give this WOE a shot.

cordial
07-25-2012, 03:52 AM
The same thing happened to me last year when I tried calorie counting :( Unfortunately, it takes a very long time for us to be disinterested in food.

mammasita
07-25-2012, 09:13 AM
Easy answer. NO.

I'm a binge eater. My relationship with food does not magically change based on the number on the scale.

toastedsmoke
07-26-2012, 03:30 PM
No, my relationship with food hasn't miraculously changed. If there was a magic pill that would allow me to eat 5000calories a day (hours and hours of exercise don't count as magic), I would probably be all over it. Many days are a struggle to stay where I need to be calorie-wise. I often am hanging on by fingernails. But you know what, I always have a choice. Sometimes I make the wrong choice,nbut many times I try to make the right one. Many things are just not worth the sacrifice. I weigh my options more carefully now. And I'm more mindful of what goes into my mouth. I'd say that's the biggest change from the start of my journey.

Lunula
07-26-2012, 04:44 PM
I've lost a lot of weight (78 lbs) since Jan 2011 and the food addiction rages on. In just the past two weeks, I've had multiple "go to the grocery store" binges (where I go specifically for binge food). I have already cleared my house of any & everything I could binge on, and this week I actually bought a small lock box for my cash, credit cards and check book - my DH takes the key to work with him (I work from home).

Knowing that I can't binge has made the cravings disappear. Otherwise, the possibility is always there. Most days, I can control it, but sometimes, well, I fail. I do NOT think it is hopeless, however. As I have lost weight, I have gained more confidence and that has made it easier. I do have other outlets now, but out of habit...I go back to binging at times.

And to a previous posters' question - I was not overweight as a kid. I started gaining weight when I went to college, it was soothing, I guess. I weighed about 125-130 at 5'6 when I went to college, and was 200 when I graduated.

scout83
07-26-2012, 04:58 PM
It might sound strange, having not lost a bunch of weight like a lot of other posters, but my food addiction has abated BEFORE my weight has gone down. This is very clearly because of counseling. Without putting in the work to acknowledge that I have emotions (craaaazy, I know) and allowing myself to feel them, there's no way I'd be able to walk away from food. Much like this could be said for alcohol, drugs, etc-- addiction is often a symptom. I had to address the issues that resulted in the symptom of overeating. Funnily enough, I didn't even go into counseling with the intention of addressing my issues with food, but it's happened that it's helped immensely in that department.

Best of luck to everyone; it's a tough battle but everyone's so dedicated, it's very inspiring.

Northernrose
07-26-2012, 07:00 PM
It's diminished, and I'm far more conscious of when I comfort eat and why. I have a food diary and I scribble down what emotion triggered me. Sometimes, I only make the connection afterwards, but I know I will one day be able to make the connection at the time. I know for certain I will overcome this with time and thought.

Kery
07-28-2012, 02:13 PM
I clearly can't eat as much as I used to (shrunk stomach, I guess), and my binging has largely receded. But partly I think the latter point is also because of heavy teeth problems I got—when your physical means of both teeth + container are gone, I guess you really can't resort to food anymore?