Weight Loss News and Current Events - New Study Says Drinking Water May Have Little Benifit




Mimzzy
06-11-2012, 04:30 PM
I heard about this study on the radio and wanted to share with everyone. I am not sure I believe the study, seems to go against everything we have been told. Even in my own experience drinking water has helped me with various things. Your thoughts?

CTV.ca News Staff

Date: Wed. Apr. 2 2008 10:02 PM ET

A new study released on Wednesday suggests that there are few health benefits to drinking large amounts of water.

Drs. Dan Negoianu and Stanley Goldfarb of the University of Pennsylvania assessed published clinical studies on the benefits of drinking water.

They found that while athletes need more water -- along with people who live in hot, dry climates and those with certain diseases -- the average healthy person does not.

In fact, the researchers found no evidence to support the common belief that drinking eight glasses of water a day can result in health benefits, which have long been believed to range from improved kidney function to a more luminous skin tone.

"It's required for life, and I guess that's led people to think, 'well, if a normal amount is good, then extra might be better,'" Goldfarb told ABC News.

"It won't harm you, but you should understand that there's very little, if any, scientific evidence that it's going to benefit you."

Some studies did show that an increased water intake does help the kidney remove substances, such as sodium. However, this did not lead to a health benefit.

Researchers cound not find conclusive evidence for other theories involving greater water intake, including that it helps fight weight gain by keeping a person feeling full, and it improves skin tone.

A study that found that participants who drank more water experienced fewer headaches was found to be too small to be significant.

One interesting conclusion was that how fast a person drinks water seems to determine if the body excretes it or retains it. If water is gulped, it will most likely be excreted. If it is sipped slowly, the body will hang on to it. However, the speed of water intake did not indicate any health benefit.

The researchers point out that although the studies they reviewed did not prove that there is a clinical benefit of drinking more water, there is also no proof that there isn't one.

"Drink when you're thirsty," said Goldfarb. "That's the way your body is designed."

The study entitled "Just Add Water" will be published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Read more: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Health/20080402/water_study_080402/#ixzz0t2HO3sZB

The video is available at this link http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Health/20080402/water_study_080402/


AbstractSilver
06-11-2012, 04:37 PM
As someone who has suffered from chronic dehydration because of my aversion to water for the majority of my life, and suffered constant headaches and other problems related to dehydration, I have to say bullocks to this.

Granted, someone who drinks 6 glasses of water a day and someone who drinks 8 probably aren't going to really be that different, but I think studies like this are dangerous because they may give people the false idea that they don't 'need' water. For people like me, who just plain hate drinking it, that can be a dangerous assumption.

So while I don't necessarily believe that drinking gallons of water a day will benefit you in the long run any more than someone who only drinks 6-8, I think that to make a generalization that water doesn't help the body is dangerous. I know that they say drinking a lot of water doesn't help, but they really aren't anywhere close to being specific enough. Articles like this SCARE me because I know there are people out there who will take this as an excuse to not get what they need.

freelancemomma
06-11-2012, 04:42 PM
I've always been in the "drink when you're thirsty" camp. I almost never drink plain water as the coffee, tea and juice I drink seem to hydrate me just fine. (My pee is never dark.) I suppose that drinking fluids on a schedule may be helpful for people who are unusually insensitive to thirst cues, but I don't think it needs to be plain water as long as the total fluid intake is adequate.

Just my two cents,

F.


berryblondeboys
06-11-2012, 05:01 PM
Dehydration is real - as abstractsilver pointed out. I will get dehydration headaches too (sometimes I forget to drink when I'm super busy).

But, is 8 better than 7? Is better than 6? and really, does that depend person to person, season to season, body frame size to body frame size?

Like, when you think about it. Do you think that a 200 pound man needs the same amount of water as a 100 pound woman? That 100 pound difference means their needs are different - food AND water.

For me, drinking JUST 8 glasses of water (or some liquid - as I drink coffee, decaf iced tea, soda, sparkling water as well as water) would leave me feeling very dehydrated. I probably drink closer to 12 glasses a day. My son who is 15, 6'1" and 140 pounds drinks at most 8 glasses of water a day. He just doesn't want more than that.

So, not seeing health benefits to larger amounts of water? I can buy that. I doubt ever in human history people worried about counting out their water or even had the opportunity to do so even if they wanted to.

LockItUp
06-11-2012, 05:08 PM
I don't pay attention to most studies either way. So many studies say one thing one year and a few years later say the exact opposite anyway.

I know for me, if I don't make sure to get enough water in I don't feel good, I'm more hungry, I get constipated. I am not at a place yet where I can *just* pay attention to thirst; although I am thirsty a lot.

But I'm not one to tell people they MUST drink X amount of water, it's an individual thing.

kaplods
06-11-2012, 06:15 PM
Three or four years ago, my mother was hospitalized for water intoxication (also called water poisoning and water overdose - which causes a dangerous drop in electrolytes, especially sodium). She was hospitalized for more than a week (who is hospitalized that long any more) they tried to get her sodium levels into a safe range).

She was almost killed because she believed many of the current water myths. She was only drinking a little more than a gallon a day, and yet it was too much for her. She could easily have died, and she did end up with permanent kidney damage because she believed what her Weight Watchers leader told her (that she had to drink extra water because of her extra pounds, that coffee and tea didn't count and she had to drink extra to compensate for caffeine).

I think this study is far less "dangerous" than all the diet myths that have become so firmly entrenched in our culture that they pass for fact and "common wisdom" to the point that even many doctors believe them (because they've heard them so often).

What concerns me most about the water myths is that they keep getting more and more extreme (like gossip, fish stories, and games of telephone).

At first it was 2 quarts of liquids including those from food

Then it was 2 quarts of liquid in addition to food

Then it was 2 quarts of non-cafeinated liquid in addition to food and caffeinated liquids.

Then it was 2 quarts of unflavored, "pure" water.

Then it was 2 quarts of unflavored, pure water PLUS an additional glass of water for every glass of caffeinated beverage (this is where my mother's water intake was at when she had the water poisoning).

Then it was 2 quarts of water plus two additional glasses of water for every glass of caffeinated beverage.

Then it was one half ounce of water per pound of body weight - plus additional water to compensate for caffeinated beverages (if you're morbidly obese, this amount of water can be fatal, especially if you happen to be on a blood pressure medication or are not eating loads of salt).

The kidney specialist called in on my mother's case told us that water poisoning was once so rare that even kidney specialists rarely saw more than once case per lifetime, and now even general practitioners are becoming familiar with it. Also, the cases used to be only seen in marathon and extreme athletes, mentally ill folk with water drinking compulsion, and people trying to pass a drug screen thinking that gallons of water would do it. That's no longer true. He said they're seeing it in people of all ages and health levels, and he believed the water myths were largely to blame.

I used to teach college classes in psychology and human development, and I taught that water intoxication is virtually impossible in a healthy person (because that's what we used to believe), but that's not true anymore, because so many of the water myths out there encourage ridiculous amounts of fluids. You can get water poisoning even if you never drink plain water, and only drink other beverages (or even only drink coffee) because caffeine doesn't provide enough water to actually dehydrate you. So an 8 ounce cup of coffee isn't "dehydrating" it just provides a little less hydration than an 8 ounce glass of water. That means that coffee doesn't provide zero hydration, and it definitely doesn't promote dehydration. It does contribute to your water needs, but may be equal to 6 or 7.5 ounces of plain water - it certainly is not equivalent to negative 8-16 ounces of water as some of the water myths suggest.

This study is just one small spit in the wind, compared to all the dangerous myths (that more and more people are believing to be gospel truth) that encourage ridiculous amounts of water.

novangel
06-11-2012, 07:01 PM
The darker your urine, the more dehydrated you are. I say drink minimum 4 glasses of water a day. I have been to the hospital for something unrelated and they told me I was very dehydrated even though I didn't feel thirsty. I got two bags of saline and felt amazing after. I'm not buying that there's no health benefit, especially for women because it does help with sodium bloat and preventing UTI's.

novangel
06-11-2012, 07:04 PM
Also, let's not forget about my favorite aliment - constipation. :/

Amygdala
06-11-2012, 07:05 PM
According to one of my physiology professors, we are all "slaves of the water industry". Apparently it's much better for your electrolytes and kindneys to only drink when you're thirsty.
Although I've often read that it's already a little too late when you feel thirsty since that means your body is already missing fluids.

novangel
06-11-2012, 07:08 PM
Although I've often read that it's already a little too late when you feel thirsty since that means your body is already missing fluids.

This is my understanding as well.

lin43
06-11-2012, 07:29 PM
I've always been in the "drink when you're thirsty" camp. I almost never drink plain water as the coffee, tea and juice I drink seem to hydrate me just fine. (My pee is never dark.) I suppose that drinking fluids on a schedule may be helpful for people who are unusually insensitive to thirst cues, but I don't think it needs to be plain water as long as the total fluid intake is adequate.

Just my two cents,

F.

I agree. It's always been common sense to me. I do find that if I drink throughout my meal, though, that I feel fuller than if I don't (again, common sense).

Serenity100
06-11-2012, 08:42 PM
I'm old. So, I get my water from my faucet. lol no need to pay good money for what I can get for free. I do believe that water helps flush out toxins in your kidneys and liver. Your urine should be almost clear, if it is not you are not drinking enough water is what I was taught. According to one of my physiology professors, we are all "slaves of the water industry". Apparently it's much better for your electrolytes and kindneys to only drink when you're thirsty.
Although I've often read that it's already a little too late when you feel thirsty since that means your body is already missing fluids.

berryblondeboys
06-11-2012, 10:29 PM
And you know what else I don't buy? that you can stave off hunger by drinking water. Nope... Now I just feel really full of water, but still very hungry.

And Kaplods - I'm so glad you shared that. Because yes, having too much water is a very, very bad thing and scary....

A very good friend started into the whole, "Oh, I can't count that soda as a liquid." What??? or that milk - "only water is water." What?????

Kahokkuri
06-11-2012, 10:49 PM
I suppose that drinking fluids on a schedule may be helpful for people who are unusually insensitive to thirst cues, but I don't think it needs to be plain water as long as the total fluid intake is adequate.
I'm someone with messed up thirst cues, no question. My natural inclination would be to drink one or two short glasses of milk a day and nothing else. The type of liquid also makes a difference for me. Yesterday I drank 8 small cups of water in the morning instead of coffee and it woke me up just the same. Today I went straight for coffee instead and I'm still barely awake! I'm sure liquid requirements are different for everyone, just like berryblondeboys suggested, but for me reading about an eight-glass benchmark for water consumption helped me realize what habits work best for me.

freelancemomma
06-11-2012, 11:46 PM
Although I've often read that it's already a little too late when you feel thirsty since that means your body is already missing fluids.

I don't know, to me that sounds like saying that it's too late when you feel hungry because your body is already missing nutrients. I guess I believe that the body gives us hunger and thirst signals well before we hit any danger zone.

F.

ValRock
06-11-2012, 11:52 PM
I don't know, to me that sounds like saying that it's too late when you feel hungry because your body is already missing nutrients. I guess I believe that the body gives us hunger and thirst signals well before we hit any danger zone.

F.

I agree!! I've known more people who've gotten into health trouble drinking too much water, than too little. Your body is pretty good at telling you what it needs.

sontaikle
06-12-2012, 12:25 AM
All health benefits (or lack) of drinking water aside, it does help with losing and maintaining weight which is a health benefit in itself.

I was a boredom eater. I would sit in front of the computer while working or just relaxing and eat because I wanted something to do. I replaced all of that with water. It really saps that urge to eat something that I still get so strongly.

I don't even keep track of how much I drink—all of this seems to be working for me anyway.

luckystreak
06-12-2012, 02:15 AM
We learnt in class it's a myth that you need to drink 8 glasses of water a day.

Well, technically it's true, thats how much you need, but you get almost all of it if you eat right - the proper amount of fruits and veggies contain enough water so that you can live healthily off much less water.


However, I still think the more water you drink, the better. I just don't see how it CAN'T help.

Heather
06-12-2012, 09:32 AM
This isn't news to me. As has been stated already, hydration is important but we get a lot of what we need from food. And all beverages count as hydration (it's a myth that caffeine pulls out more fluid than it adds).

Moreover, the 8x8 prescription did not come about based on any research at all. Someone seems to have just made it up.

Staying hydrated is important, especially when our bodies are overheated, and I do think drinking water can help people for all kinds of reasons. But the notion that we MUST X many ounces of water a day is based in no evidence I have ever found. So, if you like drinking water-- drink! And if you don't-- don't worry about it!

Sonia Banana
06-15-2012, 05:45 PM
Has anyone else noticed feeling more hungry after drinking a lot of water? Everyone says that staying hydrated reduces hunger but I actually feel more hungry if I drink water between meals. Drinking water with meals, however, does make me feel fuller.

Misti in Seattle
12-17-2012, 05:50 AM
It works both ways! I naturally drink a lot of water and love the stuff, so it's not an issue for me. But I have a friend who drank mostly herbal teas and developed kidney problems and became severely dehydrated and to drink (per her doctor) 6 glasses of water a day. She is very small so they told her she did not need 8 but definitely needed water in addition to the teas.

pluckypear
12-19-2012, 09:59 AM
The study neither proves or disproves anything. I am sure we can get by with little water if we must. And the water industry line I get but who still buys bottled water? I thought with all the knowledge on how it effects the environment that fad was waning. I don't personally know anyone who does that anymore. I was guilty of it but committed to buying no more water ages ago. I carry a glass bottle to fill from a tap. I do realize many people in the world do not have such access a thus my above statement is only directed to a small slice if our world.
I know I love water it is my favourite drink. I have great skin. I am regular. Yes still fat so does not cure that. Lol I feel great when I drink water. I rarely have headaches, maybe once per year and get a cold once per year. I cannot prove a correlation of course. But all good things can be overdone.

Nikel1979
12-19-2012, 10:09 AM
According to one of my physiology professors, we are all "slaves of the water industry". Apparently it's much better for your electrolytes and kindneys to only drink when you're thirsty.
Although I've often read that it's already a little too late when you feel thirsty since that means your body is already missing fluids.

Hmm. My Dr wants to me to drink a lot and keep my kidney pretty well flushed. I don't drink a huge amount - 8-10 cups most days. I only have the one kidney though, so maybe that makes a difference. :?:

redreine
12-25-2012, 11:48 PM
oh thank goodness for this thread, this study, and for kaplods!
the hardest part of losing weight for me has always been drinking all that water
I drink much MUCH more than the average person
and fitting in all that water meant basically drinking nothing but water, and I just am not a water person!

onmiwei
12-26-2012, 01:55 PM
I love water, always have. Plain from the tap, my favorite drink. My mom said from the time I was tiny I always wanted water. I think every body is different, my husband and my daughter rarely drink water. I find I get more thirsty if I drink anything other than water.

The only time I paid attention to anyone telling me to drink more water was when I was pregnant and had pregnancy induced hypertension. The doctor kept telling me to drink more water. I was over a gallon a day but it never helped. I drink when I am thirst and sometimes that means a 32 oz german beer mug glass full of ice cold water for breakfast, lunch and dinner along with however many glasses I want in between.

I don't drink water for health benefits I drink it because I am thirsty. So studies have never phased me on how much water to drink or not to drink.

April Snow
01-12-2013, 03:05 PM
I drink a lot of water - about half plain and half lightly flavored. I think to a certain extent, it's a habit. Getting up to get some water, and then the natural consequence a little while later of getting up to use the restroom :) is helpful at work because otherwise, I might end up just sitting at my desk for too long a time.

I live in a very dry climate now, but I drank about the same amount when I lived on the East Coast and there was a lot more natural humidity.

I suspect that to a certain extent, your body gets used to processing a usual (for you) amount of water. I know when I have significantly less that I normally do, I feel lousy. But I don't know that I'd feel great if I tried to drink way more than that either.

AlmostMe
01-21-2013, 03:38 AM
I tend to think that this obsession with drinking lots of water is a health fad. On the other hand, I know I'm currently NOT drinking enough water for the amount I'm sweating out and the amount of thirst I feel.

chubbiegurl
01-21-2013, 04:18 AM
I am sticking to a minimum of 8 glasses per day. Somedays especially furring summer I have a gallon per day. If I go under my minimum I get headaches, weight more the next day from water retention, I assume. I also get ver constipated. My husband weights 70 lbs more than me, i think he should drink more than the 8 minimum, it's hard to tell with his urine. He takes b complex which turns his pee bright yellow.
I also had a lot of lower back pain do to lack of water

stunningsparkle
01-23-2013, 08:46 PM
I agree with that article. There have been follow up studies that have shown that the original study only takes into account that we need 8 glasses of water with NO other factors. Tea has water, coffee has water, many of our foods have water. Of course we need to stay hydrated but to that extent, no. Remember you CAN drink too much water causing an electrolyte imbalance in your cells and discomfort to significant damage. My choice is G2 to help keep that balance in check.

the shiv
02-02-2013, 08:18 PM
I must go through about 10 cups of tea & coffee a day (mostly tea). I cannot remember the last time I drank any water, I think it was during particularly strenuous exercise. I have absolutely no signs of dehydration and I feel fine. My body has been telling me my whole life what it wants to eat & drink and I've been ignoring it. Only in the past 2 months when I've actually started paying attention to it have I felt better and started losing weight.

I think it's no coincidence that I recall this frenzy of absolutely HAVING to drink 8 glasses of water a day (nothing else, just water, oh and none of your dirty tap water, it must be mineral water) popping up in the early 90s, at the same time as the bottled water industry became so huge.

To me, it's nothing but folklore: marketing that has crept insidiously into medical advice.

Basically, I think this makes more sense: drink fluids, you need them. What you need will depend on your height / weight / composition / diet / exercise / hormones / environment / genetics. Your body will usually keep you right - that's why it has hormones to send signals to your brain to articulate your need for... whatever it is. If you like water, drink it. If you like tea, drink it (this doesn't really apply to stuff like coke that's full of sugar ;) ).

Daimere
02-05-2013, 05:35 AM
The study neither proves or disproves anything. I am sure we can get by with little water if we must. And the water industry line I get but who still buys bottled water? I thought with all the knowledge on how it effects the environment that fad was waning. I don't personally know anyone who does that anymore. I was guilty of it but committed to buying no more water ages ago. I carry a glass bottle to fill from a tap. I do realize many people in the world do not have such access a thus my above statement is only directed to a small slice if our world.
I know I love water it is my favourite drink. I have great skin. I am regular. Yes still fat so does not cure that. Lol I feel great when I drink water. I rarely have headaches, maybe once per year and get a cold once per year. I cannot prove a correlation of course. But all good things can be overdone.

Oh trust me, people who buy bottled is going strong. At work there are DOZENS of half drank plastic water bottles in the fridge. I use a pur filter/filtered water bottle at work. But I have one co-worker who swears her doctor told her to never drink from tap. :(

Personally I love to drink water. I can drink a ton of it. When I drink pop/coffee excessively, I feel so thirsty all the time and it makes a viscous pop-buying-drinking cycle. With water, I can feel satisfied. I don't really drink my bodyweight in it. I just try to make sure I get at least 8 cups a day. But I also sweat a lot at work.

Esofia
03-02-2013, 04:09 PM
My friend's ex-partner died of water poisoning just before Christmas. I think he had subscribed to the following myths: that water is fantastic and the more the better; and that salt is evil and everyone should avoid it.

He was small, thin, bedbound due to severe ME/CFS, and most likely had Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome. No one had even diagnosed the POTS, let alone told him that people with POTS need more salt than usual. He was avoiding salt because he'd picked up vaguely that it was healthier. He hadn't eaten anything the previous day, too ill, and so decided to get his fluids up by drinking some water. I don't know how much he drank, but it doesn't sound like it was all that much. He was dead within two days. If he'd been supplementing properly with salt, I don't think this would have happened. It's the balance of water to salt that causes the damage, due to osmosis moving water around between cells, and the brain swelling.

Ignore anyone telling you to drink ludicrous amounts of water for no good reason, and if you do need to drink a lot of water, make sure you get salt as well. It's worth generally working out how much salt you're getting and how much you personally need.

I have severe ME/CFS and almost certainly have POTS, so I now aim to drink 2.5l of water a day, with half a teaspoon of salt mixed into each 800ml/27oz water bottle (actually, it's half sea salt and half low-sodium salt, so I get potassium too). Some of us do need that. I'm using a water-drinking app to remind me to drink enough. My blood pressure seems to be a bit better on this, more often normal and less often low, but it's hard to tell as the doctor's been changing my meds quite a lot.

sweettooth56
03-15-2013, 07:44 PM
It's really hard to comment on the validity of the reasearch, but I discovered something that works for me, anyway.

A few years ago, I was surfing one night and had a horrible craving to eat - I usually crave either sweets, or protein. As it turned out, I had a bottle of water sitting beside me, so thought that I would drink the water. It was an AHA moment - once I had finished the water, I not only wasn't hungry, but didn't have the cravings any longer.

Since then, I have made it a ritual to drink the equivalent of a bottle of water if I feel cravings coming on. By doing that, I am able to better decide whether I am truly hungry and need to eat, or just dehydrated.

...my 2 cents

Keep Moving Forward
04-05-2013, 06:35 PM
I know for me, drinking water helps me eat a lot less. And it helps keep me from getting the heart palpitations that I can get with my mitral valve prolapse. I usually drink around 64oz of just water, as well as two-ish cups of coffee or tea. I will certainly be doing more research about water consumption though, concerning how much is too much.

All of you made valid points that I agree with and I think it comes down to this: Everyone has different fluid needs that can't be met with a one-size-fits-all rule like 8 8oz glasses/day.

AnnRue
04-06-2013, 03:04 PM
I think water must have some effect -- while the theories that have been proposed before are likely true.. such as you are thirsty not hungry etc... I submit two other reasons for the effect.

(1) Water is "H2O" so that means you are taking in more than 2/3rds Oxygen. There is actually evidence out there that oxygen can increase weight loss. In fact some people go to what is called Oxygen therapy where they put the mask over their face and suck it down for weight loss. You may remember an infomercial a few years back with this lady who proposed weight loss just via breathing. I always thought that was intriguing. But based on that I have always wondered if exercise is good for you / weight loss because while you are breathing heavier you are getting more Oxygen - than if you were just sitting around the house.

(2) The liver is known to be the only fat burning organ in your body. The liver is the major fat burning organ in the body and regulates fat metabolism. And what keeps the liver in amazing shape... water! Water is great for the liver and kidneys and help both expel toxins and many other issues.

I went on a mostly liquid diet last year and while there were tons of reasons it could have worked so amazingly I have to note that a lot of liquid diets / fasting do work amazing. Also my liver enzymes fell like a stone... I have to think there is something to and and we are dehydrated. My hair was never thicker, my skin never better than when I was full on the liquid diet and since going off I have noticed dryer skin and hair, something I might not have noticed before because it doesn't look that bad.

atmos
04-13-2013, 11:54 AM
Oxygen can increase weight loss? Interesting. I live in an area with about 17% less oxygen than what is at sea level and we have the lowest obesity level in the country. Also, I'm no chemist, but I don't think the oxygen atom becomes unbonded from the two hydrogen atoms. Also the oxygen we breathe is O2, two oxygen atmos. I don't think 1 free oxygen atom is stable and would try to bond to something. But like I said, I'm no chemist so I can't remember for sure from my studies.

I drink, at minimum, 2 liters per day. More if I exercise or eat a lot of salty food. But I also live in a semi-arid climate that can get pretty hot during the summer, which was one of the caveats. I rarely drank water when I lived back east where it was cooler and more moist. I carry a bottle of water with me pretty much everywhere I go so that it's available to me when I need it. I also rely a lot more on lotions and chapsticks than I did before moving out here.

I guess I'm in the "drink when you feel you need to" camp, but I think having water at hand facilitates it.

TripSwitch
04-13-2013, 12:04 PM
Water is "H2O" so that means you are taking in more than 2/3rds Oxygen.

the "H2O" molecule is two hydrogen atoms and ONE oxygen atom...

AnnRue
04-13-2013, 12:11 PM
the "H2O" molecule is two hydrogen atoms and ONE oxygen atom...

Woops sorry... never mind.

Although I read this whole theory on this in a book once...

Jennifer1966
04-20-2013, 09:30 AM
I feel better when I drink a lot of water. I probably drink at least 100 oz during the week and a little less on weekends. The only other liquid I get is black coffee in the morning (1-2 cups) and weekend drinks.

kd007
04-22-2013, 05:39 PM
Human body is 70% water. And Oxygen is the basic component of energy that the body uses. The more water you drink the more you are helping your body to flush the toxins out of your system and also helping your body lose the weight which is also highly related to being toxic. Juicing is also beneficial for supplying the body with the hydration it requires. having a dry skin and aging are all symptoms of dehydration of the body. Those who drink a lot of water look and feel younger and also don't gain as much weight as the one who drink only a couple of glasses a day. An ideal amount is like 3 litres per day for an average person

patns
04-23-2013, 11:18 AM
Three or four years ago, my mother was hospitalized for water intoxication (also called water poisoning and water overdose - which causes a dangerous drop in electrolytes, especially sodium). She was hospitalized for more than a week (who is hospitalized that long any more) they tried to get her sodium levels into a safe range).

She was almost killed because she believed many of the current water myths. She was only drinking a little more than a gallon a day, and yet it was too much for her. She could easily have died, and she did end up with permanent kidney damage because she believed what her Weight Watchers leader told her (that she had to drink extra water because of her extra pounds, that coffee and tea didn't count and she had to drink extra to compensate for caffeine).

I think this study is far less "dangerous" than all the diet myths that have become so firmly entrenched in our culture that they pass for fact and "common wisdom" to the point that even many doctors believe them (because they've heard them so often).

What concerns me most about the water myths is that they keep getting more and more extreme (like gossip, fish stories, and games of telephone).

At first it was 2 quarts of liquids including those from food

Then it was 2 quarts of liquid in addition to food

Then it was 2 quarts of non-cafeinated liquid in addition to food and caffeinated liquids.

Then it was 2 quarts of unflavored, "pure" water.

Then it was 2 quarts of unflavored, pure water PLUS an additional glass of water for every glass of caffeinated beverage (this is where my mother's water intake was at when she had the water poisoning).

Then it was 2 quarts of water plus two additional glasses of water for every glass of caffeinated beverage.

Then it was one half ounce of water per pound of body weight - plus additional water to compensate for caffeinated beverages (if you're morbidly obese, this amount of water can be fatal, especially if you happen to be on a blood pressure medication or are not eating loads of salt).

The kidney specialist called in on my mother's case told us that water poisoning was once so rare that even kidney specialists rarely saw more than once case per lifetime, and now even general practitioners are becoming familiar with it. Also, the cases used to be only seen in marathon and extreme athletes, mentally ill folk with water drinking compulsion, and people trying to pass a drug screen thinking that gallons of water would do it. That's no longer true. He said they're seeing it in people of all ages and health levels, and he believed the water myths were largely to blame.

I used to teach college classes in psychology and human development, and I taught that water intoxication is virtually impossible in a healthy person (because that's what we used to believe), but that's not true anymore, because so many of the water myths out there encourage ridiculous amounts of fluids. You can get water poisoning even if you never drink plain water, and only drink other beverages (or even only drink coffee) because caffeine doesn't provide enough water to actually dehydrate you. So an 8 ounce cup of coffee isn't "dehydrating" it just provides a little less hydration than an 8 ounce glass of water. That means that coffee doesn't provide zero hydration, and it definitely doesn't promote dehydration. It does contribute to your water needs, but may be equal to 6 or 7.5 ounces of plain water - it certainly is not equivalent to negative 8-16 ounces of water as some of the water myths suggest.

This study is just one small spit in the wind, compared to all the dangerous myths (that more and more people are believing to be gospel truth) that encourage ridiculous amounts of water.



I am copying this because I think it has such important information that we rarely hear.

If I drank the amount of water WW coaches told me I had to I wouldn't be able to work. I would have to spend the day a few feet from a bathroom. I drink when I am thirsty but also watch the colour of my urine.

freelancemomma
04-23-2013, 11:39 AM
I must go through about 10 cups of tea & coffee a day (mostly tea). I cannot remember the last time I drank any water, I think it was during particularly strenuous exercise. I have absolutely no signs of dehydration and I feel fine.

Ditto. And I might add that I never get any headaches -- well, maybe one every year or two -- and that my pee is only lightly coloured. You and I are living proof that the notion that you must drink X cups of plain water is complete bunk. As previously noted, many other drinks and foods contain lots of water. As long as you're sufficiently hydrated, it doesn't matter how you get there.

F.

DianeM2
04-24-2013, 01:46 AM
Have you ever had a kidney stone? I have. Incredibly painful. I was told my a doctor that (pardon the detail) urine should never be bright yellow. Drinking water is essential, imo. ymmv.

DianeM2
04-24-2013, 01:52 AM
I've always been in the "drink when you're thirsty" camp. I almost never drink plain water as the coffee, tea and juice I drink seem to hydrate me just fine. (My pee is never dark.) I suppose that drinking fluids on a schedule may be helpful for people who are unusually insensitive to thirst cues, but I don't think it needs to be plain water as long as the total fluid intake is adequate.

Just my two cents,

F.

Everything I've read lately says that you do need to drink water, but the water in food and coffee/tea/soda count as "water". It makes sense. Your body is just going to filter out the non-water parts and use the water, anyway.