Weight Loss Support - Nutritionist just shot all my efforts to H-E-**... Now what?




lisa130
05-09-2012, 12:25 AM
So Ive been stuck trying to lose the last 20 pounds for a few years now - due to varying degrees of effort, complacency, time, etc. 20 lbs is actually just a guess, I'd be happy losing no weight if I could get to a body in which I felt healthy, happy, and comfortable for my frame.

I recommitted myself in February and began strictly calorie counting (weighing) and exercising 3-5x a week (first mostly cardio for 30min, now mostly circuit training with heavy weights for about 35min-50min), although lately with finals month that has fallen to 2x a week :(. I eat anything, but mostly follow what can short-hand be summed up as a whole-foods, 40-30-30 meal plan with plenty of fresh veggies, lean protein, low fat dairy, monounsat oils, and whole grain carbs. Of course there are times when I have gelato or a cupcake or cookies, or something like that, but it's been worked into my calorie allotment for the day 1500cal.

I saw an RD because I'm frustrated with my lack of losses and I'm at a loss of what changes I actually need to make - there's so much misinformation out there. She basically said I was doing everything wrong, and now I feel completely lost. Her advice was:

1. Don't count calories, just eat protein, fat and complex carb at every meal. It doesn't matter how much I eat as long as I have each macronutrient at every meal... whoa. :dizzy:
2. Don't go too long without eating (I had large breaks between meals) - depending upon how much carb/fat/prot I eat it should be anywhere from 1-4 hours break between snacks/meals
3. Don't lift! - do cardio for at least 30 mins and then weights only if I have time (this one surprises me)
4. Don't eat too close to bedtime, eat larger meals early in the day

I've been a calorie counter my whole twenties - plus I love weights and from what I've read, I believe circuit training can be as good or better than cardio for weightloss. Buutt... obviously I don't know much, I've been plateaued at a weight I don't want to be at for a year +. Has anyone adopted these above techniques with any success? I start tomorrow...


Desiderata
05-09-2012, 12:31 AM
What do you know about her credentials and training? You said RD, the nutritionist... I'd be asking her a lot more questions about what certifications she has before taking seriously any of her advice that you've shared here. (Of course, I'm incredibly underwhelmed to begin with by what conventional dietetics programs consider gospel. My doctor actually was in her dietician residency long ago before quitting, because she couldn't stomach the job of having to design such harmful meal plans for very ill people.) Anyway, I'd sure be interested if your nutritionist could back up that advice with quality studies (because I'm suuuper skeptical!) :)

ValRock
05-09-2012, 12:39 AM
Uhhhhhhh......

I wonder how I've managed to lose almost 100 lbs doing exactly the OPPOSITE of what this lady is advocating. Take all that with a grain of salt. Maybe that worked for her?? But it's certainly not universal, or even very good, advice!!!


Bobbles
05-09-2012, 12:39 AM
Interestingly enough, her advice is very similar to what my coworker was told when she started seeing a RD. One thing to note - she wasn't given carte blanche to eat any- and everything she wanted, she DID have suggested serving sizes for her protein/carbs + unlimited veggies, but when i asked her what her calories were at, she said she was told not to worry about that, just the good, nutritious food she was eating. She's lost about 54lbs in 6 months and looks fantastic. I'm not sure what her workout routines are like right now but I know she used to do cardio 3x a week for ~20 minutes at a pop because that's all she could manage at her weight.

LockItUp
05-09-2012, 12:43 AM
Sounds like her opinions to me. I don't agree with anything she told you whatsoever.

So is she an actual registered dietitian with an actual degree and credentials or is she just a nutritionist (which, depending on the state, could mean absolutely nothing). I just don't see how a dietitian has any business giving you workout advice and telling you not to lift! That alone makes me very skeptical of her knowledge!

TONS and TONS of people are hugely successful going against all of the advice she gave you.

missunderstood28
05-09-2012, 01:00 AM
Lifting = More muscle = More calories burned

I dont get it

ValRock
05-09-2012, 01:02 AM
Lifting = More muscle = More calories burned

I dont get it

Exactly... the afterburn and muscle building of lifting makes it more efficient than cardio. Where did this woman go to school?

luckystreak
05-09-2012, 01:34 AM
Actually, all of that advice was really good except the lifting.. but she said to do weights, I guess what she meant was focus on cardio for weight loss, cos some people go to the gym, stay on the dinky machines for 15 minutes and call it a work out.

cbigsis
05-09-2012, 01:41 AM
I had a nutritionist that gave me a program that was similar in some ways. To eat no farther than 4 hours apart throughout the day. And she said to eat within one hour of waking up to boost metabolism which slows down the longer you go between meals. She also said protein, fat and complex carb for each meal. And at least 2 snacks per day with at least 2 different food groups in them. That could be a dairy and a fruit. Or a protein and a veggie. Any combo was fine. She put me on a plan that did not count calories but had numbers of servings of food groups throughout the day. But she did say it generally would come out to about 1800 - 2100 calories which she said if I were exercising 45 min to 1 hour per day 5 days a week would give a healthy weight loss of 1 pound per week. I will say when I follow the meal plan correctly I absolutely lose at least 1 pound per week. I just don't always follow it perfectly! And she advocated ANY exercise. If you enjoy what you are doing you are more likely to continue doing it.

kaplods
05-09-2012, 02:01 AM
This might be great advice for some people, but you have to find out if it's good advice for you (if you don't already know). So you can try it and see, or if you know some of the advice isn't going to work for you, then use what does sound helpful and ignore the rest.

I know from 40 years of experience which would work for me



1. Don't count calories, just eat protein, fat and complex carb at every meal. It doesn't matter how much I eat as long as I have each macronutrient at every meal


Horrible advise for me. I've tried it, and it so doesn't work. The only way I can eat without counting calories and lose weight (for a short time) is by very low carb dieting (like Atkins Induction). If I eat super low carb, I do lose my appetite, but I also get shaky and get headaches... and after a while I do start overeating even on induction. I've stalled weight loss on super low-carb by not having to "count." For me, counting is essential, no matter what I'm eating.






2. Don't go too long without eating (I had large breaks between meals) - depending upon how much carb/fat/prot I eat it should be anywhere from 1-4 hours break between snacks/meals


This is reasonably good advice for me,but it's "most true" when I'm eating too many carbs. Even when they're healthy, whole-grain carbs, I have to be careful not to eat a meal or snack that's too high in carbs. If I have little or no protein or fat, the snack will not sustain me, and I'll be ravenous in an hour. By eating high fiber, but low in digestible carbs, I'm satisfied much longer, and sometimes 4 or even more hours can pass before I'm hungry again. Eating higher glycemic foods (even from complex carbohydrates) and I'll feel like I'm starving in an hour or less.


3. Don't lift! - do cardio for at least 30 mins and then weights only if I have time (this one surprises me)


This is dumb advice for most people. It assumes that you're going to gain muscle (so see a gain on the scale), but this kind of gain is a good kind of gain to have (and it's usually temporary, because the added muscle will burn more fat).

This is one of those "baby with the bathwater" pieces of advice for most people. If there's some physical reason that muscle gain would be bad (I can't even think of one, but there might be) ok, but mostly it's just people being more concerned with the number on the scale than with true health. In the long-run a pound or two of muscle gain is going to help your health and your waist line.


4. Don't eat too close to bedtime, eat larger meals early in the day


This doesn't work well for me at all. I understand the logic of it, but I've learned that I am hungriest in the evening, no matter how I distribute my calories. If I eat most of my calories in the morning or forbid evening snacks, I'm miserable all evening and I'm prone to wake up in the middle of the night feeling as though I'm starving.

For me there is no "too close to bedtime" but there is the opposite. If I DON'T have a snack in the evening, I'm prone to mid-night eating - or as bad waking up very hungry and being unable to fall back to sleep because I'm kept awake by the hunger and food thoughts.



The only way to discover if the advice is good for you is by your own experience. If you already have the experience, you can make the judgement now. If you don't have the experience, try the advice to see if it works, but don't be "married" to it. If it doesn't work for you, then try something else or go back to what you know does.

For me, calorie-counting or counting in some format is absolutely essential (I like exchange plans because they "count" both calories and carbs, and they help insure that my diet is relatively balanced). Without exchange plan diets, I tend to go on food "jags." I'll eat too much fruit and not enough dairy, or I'll eat so many fruits and veggies I get sick - and then I'll avoid veggies for a while. Eating consistently helps me insure balance and prevent against digestive problems by eating too much fiber or too much fat from one of my jags.

bronzeager
05-09-2012, 02:23 AM
Maybe she thinks you are overdoing it? Sometimes LOTS of exercise and LOTs of deficit can be counter productive because the stress can cause your body to resist: Lyle McDonald on Why big caloric deficits and activity can hurt fat loss (http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/why-big-caloric-deficits-and-lots-of-activity-can-hurt-fat-loss.html).

JohnP
05-09-2012, 02:36 AM
Maybe she thinks you are overdoing it? Sometimes LOTS of exercise and LOTs of deficit can be counter productive because the stress can cause your body to resist: Lyle McDonald on Why big caloric deficits and activity can hurt fat loss (http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/why-big-caloric-deficits-and-lots-of-activity-can-hurt-fat-loss.html).

You're giving the nutritionist WAY too much credit. Regardless of the qualifications her advice is extremely generic and sounds like something out of a textbook.

The situation of the OP sounds nothing like what Lyle is talking about.

To the OP - are you mostly sedentary during the day except for when you exercise a couple times a week?

sontaikle
05-09-2012, 06:50 AM
WTF is up with that nutritionist?

Honestly I think it's weight training that helped me drop my weight quickly!! Why would someone ever advise not to lift weights?

Yeah sure, you might be heavier in the end but you'll LOOK smaller!



Go through how much you're eating and double check that you're actually consuming 1500 calories. Every so often I like to check myself and make sure I'm consuming how many calories I think I am.

Rana
05-09-2012, 10:41 AM
I've been to two nutritionists now, both supposedly highly ranked in their field, and I have found that both were useless to me.

I know more about my body and what works for my body than they do. The last nutritionist that I went to insisted that I eat more carbs because I work out so much and ride long distances -- the end result of that was the highest A1C (3 month blood sugar test) than ever before and putting me way too close to "diabetic" than I have been in my entire life.

And it was with a nutritionist that KNEW that I was insulin resistance and had PCOS!!!!!

If her advice doesn't jive with what you know about your weight loss and body, then it's probably not good advice. That's your intuition telling you it's wrong.

My personal, unsolicited advice is to read as much as you can on nutrition yourself, read as much as you can on working out (cardio and weight training should be part of your schedule), and then by trial and error figure it out. A nutritionist is not going to give you any information you can't find on Google or even just on this website.

lisa130
05-09-2012, 11:03 AM
You're giving the nutritionist WAY too much credit. Regardless of the qualifications her advice is extremely generic and sounds like something out of a textbook.

The situation of the OP sounds nothing like what Lyle is talking about.

To the OP - are you mostly sedentary during the day except for when you exercise a couple times a week?

I am a full-time pharmacy student and I work on computers, so I would say yes, mainly sedentary. I walk a bit to class (<.5 miles) but unless I'm in the gym I'm sitting in classes or the library for about 5-8 hours a day :( . My weekends are more active in addition to going to the gym (biking, walking, yoga, etc).



The question about her credentials was a very good and valid one, and something I should have checked before assuming that the free, University-provided wellness counselor was a Registered Dietician... Her credentials just say MS from Michigan. (No major specified).

Now I'm scared to stop counting... ahh.

Blueberries
05-09-2012, 11:04 AM
I agree that her advice on lifting is particularly terrible. Lifting (heavy) weights throughout weight loss will help you maintain muscle, which means more of what you lose will be fat.

bargoo
05-09-2012, 11:08 AM
My advice, fire the nutritionist ! Of her advice the only thing I agreed with is "Don't go too long without eating".

pixelllate
05-09-2012, 11:09 AM
Many nutritionists, even the famous ones give out advice like it is THE way to do it, and in reality, many of us have been successful doing something else. Its frusterating, I work at a nonprofit for low income families and many of them eat the traditional cuisine from the country that they immigrated from. We had a nutritionist come in and just give out this very "absolute" advice - very Do this and Do that based on a very modern American diet - when their traditional cuisine, which is mainly unprocessed food, was fine. My father has health problems and eats Chinese food, but its all the restaurant stuff and the sweets. My mother eats Chinese food, but its mainly the less processed, more home cooked food. Its so interesting because my mother's doctor tells her things like don't eat rice, if you want carbs eat oatmeal, but my family in Hong Kong (where she is from) eats rice all the time, but everything else they eat is generally veg and protein, not that many sweets. But the doctor only talked about the rice. I myself don't eat rice, but I think that its possible to include rice in your diet and be healthy. Oh and eggs. I suspect my mother's doctor would faint is she knew how many eggs with the YOLK I eat! :dizzy:


1. Don't count calories, just eat protein, fat and complex carb at every meal. It doesn't matter how much I eat as long as I have each macronutrient at every meal... whoa.
-That is probably based on assuming that you will obsess over cals and then binge later. Thats the only "reasoning" I ever found for that - this type of diet assumes that you will be eating at a cal deficit but just in an unconscious way. I prefer knowing my cals, I can overeat anything.
2. Don't go too long without eating (I had large breaks between meals) - depending upon how much carb/fat/prot I eat it should be anywhere from 1-4 hours break between snacks/meals
Part of it might be because you do a (small) metabolic increase when you eat frequently, but its so small it doesn't make a real difference, if intermittent fasting works for you, you can def get a big cal deficit that way. I also think that its recommended because its assumed people who want to eat a lot at least get to eat frequently, so they don't freak out about depriving themselves of food. Kind of like the idea that you need to eat everything in moderation or else you'll binge-what keeps me from binging (other than the emotional part) is eliminating certain foods.

3. Don't lift! - do cardio for at least 30 mins and then weights only if I have time (this one surprises me)
Probably because she is thinking of burning cals, and not the long term benefits of lifting. Sure the cardio will burn the cals when you do it, but weight lifting in the long term will have great benefits, muscle itself does burn cals, but I guess if you wanted to target straight cal burning, its also good to do cardio. Both are good, but maybe she just wants you to just lose weight and figures that the hours of cardio might do that.

4. Don't eat too close to bedtime, eat larger meals early in the day

Generic, I think its based on the assumption that you will want to eat Pringles at night.
A lot of the assumptions are based on what will cause you to "mentally break" - to get all desperate and overeat and give up on the diet, but a lot of those strategies had the opposite affect on me!

Daimere
05-09-2012, 11:15 AM
4. Don't eat too close to bedtime, eat larger meals early in the day


One of my friends swear by this but I've had to come to realize that this is something that can't happen for me. I work night shift and try to go to bed at 10 AM. I'm ravenous after work. Am I supposed to just starve myself to sleep? I hope not! And that will also mean after an hour of getting home, I would be digging for some cheese So I eat a bit lighter like cereal or something.

If you know something won't work with your body, don't do it. The don't lift weights thing is absolutely laughable to be honest.

ennay
05-09-2012, 11:21 AM
Please dont waste your money on this person. "Dont lift weights" alone should be enough to run screaming. The rest of the stuff is at least something that has been in favor by someone sometime in the last 40 years.

Frankly the advice for me is exactly how I GOT fat. I never ate bad food, I always ate protein/fat/carb at every meal. Giving me unlimited license to do that every 1-4 hours? Holy ****. If I followed her advice I would gain 2-3 lbs a week.

Vex
05-09-2012, 11:21 AM
Interesting. The one about lifting definitely surprised me.

Always remember - doctors, teachers, and yes nutritionists are still people just like us and can be wrong.

.

Beach Patrol
05-09-2012, 11:47 AM
1. Don't count calories, just eat protein, fat and complex carb at every meal. It doesn't matter how much I eat as long as I have each macronutrient at every meal... whoa. :dizzy:
2. Don't go too long without eating (I had large breaks between meals) - depending upon how much carb/fat/prot I eat it should be anywhere from 1-4 hours break between snacks/meals
3. Don't lift! - do cardio for at least 30 mins and then weights only if I have time (this one surprises me)
4. Don't eat too close to bedtime, eat larger meals early in the day


WTF... :?:

OK, first of all

#1 -It doesn't matter how much I eat - oh really? OF COURSE IT MATTERS! Over-eating is what makes us fat in the first place! Whether you over-eat Snickers bars or over-eat broccoli & asparagus, you're STILL consuming MORE calories than your body needs & therefore whatever you do not burn, it will be stored as FAT.

#2 -Don't go too long without eating -Ok, I can (sometimes) agree with this because most people have trouble staying within limits if they let themselves get too hungry. Then again, what's "WRONG" with being HUNGRY? It won't kill us to be hungry. In fact, how can we ever hope to eat like a "normal person" if we don't learn to eat by our hunger & fullness ques??

#3 -Don't lift! - do cardio for at least 30 mins and then weights only if I have time (this one surprises me) -Of course it surprises you, because it's bogus advice. If you only have time to do either cardio OR weight lifting, always ALWAYS choose the weight lifting. But ideally, for fitness, you should make time to do both.

#4 -Don't eat too close to bedtime, eat larger meals early in the day - again with the "rules". If it's close to bedtime & you decide to eat - then you should eat. Larger meals early in the day? Sure - if you HAVE to eat a "larger" meal. I'm of the frame of mind that we should eat til 80% full - NEVER eat a "large meal" if you can help it. LARGE AMOUNTS OF FOOD.... TOO MUCH FOOD... this is what makes us OVERWEIGHT to begin with. Regardless of why a person eats too much, if a person eats too much, they likely will be overweight.





I know more about my body and what works for my body than they do.

^^THIS!!!^^

pnkrckpixikat
05-09-2012, 12:31 PM
I agree with the majority in that this plan does not sound like the best advice. Sure it could work for some, but without lifting wont get that fit look most people aspire to.

My main thought is that you obviously went to see this person because you arent happy with your current results. You said you are eating 1500 cals, are you stalled at this or just loosing slower then you'd like? if you are stalled you may be eating at matinance. with your height weight and acticity level how did you pick this number? you may need to drop a little lower or add more daily exercise .

lisa130
05-09-2012, 02:07 PM
I agree with the majority in that this plan does not sound like the best advice. Sure it could work for some, but without lifting wont get that fit look most people aspire to.

My main thought is that you obviously went to see this person because you arent happy with your current results. You said you are eating 1500 cals, are you stalled at this or just loosing slower then you'd like? if you are stalled you may be eating at matinance. with your height weight and acticity level how did you pick this number? you may need to drop a little lower or add more daily exercise .

I'm stalled, and have been for a long time. I picked 1500 because I read that I should choose in between my BMR and TDEE. I don't know whether to go up or down or change the macros or what I'm doing wrong, which is why I chose to see someone. I do need more exercise so, after this thread clarified for me that this person's advice is not the best, I'll probably just try to add in some more cardio to the weights I already do and see if that works. Time is always a limiting factor in my life, just like for every other busy person on Earth, so that's why I hadn't already added in the cardio.

Charmed7
05-09-2012, 02:23 PM
I didn't read all of the responses, so sorry if I'm repeating anything said...

But really, I don't know if all that advice is good. I know I lost weight a few years back and was down to 170. I calorie counted and was frustrated with 1500 or 1400 or 1200 etc etc. I couldn't feel comfortable finding a calorie count for the day that I could maintain and lose weight. I never broke the 170 mark.

This time around I decided to try WW. They do have a similar plan, were most veggies and fruits don't count towards your points. And they have a power food list that if you aren't counting points, but (what they call) simply filling, then you can eat whatever is on the power food list (similiar to the list you gave) without counting. But to eat until full as a rule of thumb. I'm almost down 10 lbs since starting, and hoping once I hit 170 I keep losing on this plan. We'll see.

I do know, the girls on The Biggest Loser will eat 1200 calories, so you might be eating enough to maintain, and not lose which is why you're not seeing a loss. There is also a thing called calorie cycling, which might work for you if you are lifting...

Honestly, I don't know. I agree with others though, the not lifting part doesn't make a lot of sense to me. Even if you are building muscle and replacing fat, you'll feel and look better which it seems is your ultimate goal.

Good luck, sorry I couldn't be more insightful.

C7

JohnP
05-09-2012, 03:03 PM
I am a full-time pharmacy student and I work on computers, so I would say yes, mainly sedentary. I walk a bit to class (<.5 miles) but unless I'm in the gym I'm sitting in classes or the library for about 5-8 hours a day :( . My weekends are more active in addition to going to the gym (biking, walking, yoga, etc).

Depending on how long you have been stuck at your current weight I would suggest you add in some additional exercise but not very taxing exercise. As in - more walking. Brisk walking to be specific. This way you'll be burning more calories but not making yourself too tired to take away energy from your studies.

The bottom line is if you're sitting around all day it is likely that you're just maintaining or losing fat so slowly it is not perceptible. I don't suggest cutting calories more because using your brain all day can make you feel hungry dispite not having burned many calories. Thus - I would just add in a little more walking. If you could add in 30-45 minutes every morning of brisking walking I believe it would make a difference. Plus - probably help you relax a little. I for one find walking quite relaxing.

pnkrckpixikat
05-09-2012, 03:11 PM
i totally get the time crunch thing. It doesnt have to be an elaborate workout or anything. You can start with something as simple as a set of squats or jumping jacks or something everytime you go to the restroom. Something to get your heart beating a little and blood flowing. One set doesnt seem like much but they add up if you do them everytime.

Also when studying maybe take a 5 or 10 min break every hour or so and run in place or do pushups or something. Again, just keeping the body slightly more active then your current level.

You could even pair this with cutting cals slightly. I'd recommend going to myfitnesspal or something similar and plugging in your stats with sedentary being your activity level and see what it places your cals at to lose, this makes any cals buurned with exercise bonus cals so to speak, and decide how you want to go from there.

sacha
05-09-2012, 03:27 PM
Why is an RD giving specific training advice? I wouldn't go to an RD for training advice just like I wouldn't ask a PT for specific diet advice - sure, they have 'general' knowledge but that doesn't make them experts or even well-educated on the subject.

I know RD's are quite regulated but is specific fitness part of that?

munchievictim
05-09-2012, 03:36 PM
Personally, I usually eat dinner around 8 or 9. So do a lot of people in European countries, and there are tons of books about how to look like a French woman or whatever, not to mention we're the ones (americans) with the truly heinous weight statistics, and most people have heard the whole "stop eating late at night" golden rule.
don't lift is idiotic advice.
But I think it's all personal preference (or what works best), and these rules are arbitrary. It may work for you, but since a lot of this advice seems to stem from psychology rather than nutrition, I would take it with a grain of salt. My doctor forbid me from weighing every day because I'm not losing fast enough (at 3 lbs a week- I can lose faster but I've done this SEVERAL times and for the first time I'm trying to take it slow, be patient and be happy with the weight loss I do have) and I let that advice go in one ear and out the other. Because I weigh every day I know how my body works and how it's losing, and it's not slow because I'm curled up in a ball in my bathroom floor flipping out about daily fluctuations on the scale. I know my body and am not insecure about weight gain that has a reasonable explanation.
For me, the best thing is to know my body and be aware. I don't want to just be given a meal plan and a bunch of silly rules and follow them blindly. If you educate yourself about how your body works and what your hunger patterns are, rules like that are useless (and dangerous, if they mess with a plan that's working!). If you're stalled, maybe you should switch up your food intake or exercise. Sprint intervals let you get cardio in without a lot of time invested, and they always kick my metabolism into high gear.

Couch
05-09-2012, 09:06 PM
If you've been stuck at the same weight since february whilst creating a significant calorie deficit, it might be worth getting your thyroid checked.

If your heart rate is high during your weights session, and a circuit with heavy weights should be getting you heart going, then you are already doing cardio. If not, do some star jumps or run on the spot between sets.

Couch
05-09-2012, 09:11 PM
Oh, don't do what I did! When I showed a trainer my food journal, I was told that I didn't need to count calories, but that I was eating too much cake. Instead of deciding to ignore her advice and keep doing what was working for me, I reacted in a very sensible way - I stopped counting calories and started eating more cake!

So much of weight loss is about emotions and psychology and relationships and finding out what works for you. Feel free to discount any advice that you know won't work.

lisa130
05-09-2012, 09:56 PM
I truly appreciate everyone's comments and after feeling despaired after talking to this nutritionist/counselor, I feel clarified and hopeful after coming here. Thank you all for your advice. :) I think I realized right away that I didn't agree with my nutritionist, and it is nice to see that others feel the same way.


JohnP and pnkrckpixikat, I agree with you both and will be putting some walking/cardio into my routine. I have a feeling that's the boost I need and I don't know why it took hearing it from other people to get me started. I do find brisk walking relaxing, maybe it will even help me study better. And I will use that to supplement my weight circuit training, which I really do believe in. I already use MFP and they put me at about 1471 for 1lb/wk, so I'll probably just keep everything the same and try the cardio.

I go to a large university and to think that every student that uses University services to get nutritional advice has to go through this woman makes me kind of sad. They should be coming to this site instead!

bronzeager
05-10-2012, 02:57 PM
You're giving the nutritionist WAY too much credit. Regardless of the qualifications her advice is extremely generic and sounds like something out of a textbook.

The situation of the OP sounds nothing like what Lyle is talking about.

To the OP - are you mostly sedentary during the day except for when you exercise a couple times a week?

I agree this is not what Lyle means, but in my experience university medical personnel tend to err in the direction of "no matter what she tells me let's assume she has an eating disorder/exercise addiction and treat her that way."* So she may well be thinking that.

*After they give you the pregnancy test/put you on the Pill, of course, because that's the other possibility high in their minds.