Weight Loss Support - Need your opinions PLEASE! Do I HAVE to count cals?




LockItUp
04-26-2012, 11:30 AM
Doubt is creeping in to my "logic" and I need to hear the truth and I know you all will give it to me! I seriously do want 100% honesty!

It's been about 6 weeks since I started now; I started this round at 219.8 lbs. The first 2 weeks I counted calories diligently, but I was starting to get obsessed with the numbers as I always do when I count, it was taking up hours of my time as I would recalculate every meal before I ate it to get the optimum amount of calories. Then I did a 7 day challenge that was all veggies and some protein to kind of cleanse and detox myself off of processed foods because that's what I overeat, that's what triggers me, so I want to try to stay away from that kind of food as much as possible.

It's been a week and a half since that ended and since then I've just been eating healthy (lots of veggies: probably 5 - 9 servings/day, some fruits: 1 - 4 servings/day, lean protein: 3 times/day usually like eggs/eggwhites, chicken, fish, tofu. nuts: 1-2 times/day, and fats like EVOO and Coconut oil 1 - 2 servings/day and trying to stay away from grains because that is also a trigger for me) and not counting calories., but I still weigh portion sizes with the exceptions of veggies. I have slipped once food wise (eating processed foods) and 2 other days I know I went over the calories I try to aim for. I also decided to try Eat Stop Eat this week, I did my first fast Sunday and today is my 2nd. I joined a gym Sunday and have finally been working out steadily (although I realize it hasn't even been a week, steady exercise has been missing until now), cardio and weight training. Also I drink at least a gallon of water per day, and have cut out coffee for green tea because coffee was upsetting my stomach come to find out.

Ok, so here's my question: am I fooling myself into thinking it's possible to NOT count calories and still lose weight? I really really really don't want to have to count!!! But do I just need to bite the bullet?

I weigh daily and haven't lost at all in about 2 weeks, I go up to about 206.8 and back down to 205. I probably just need to put the scale away because it's starting to get in my head. But I really am wondering if it's just a silly scale thing or if I am doing something to not lose weight.

I am annoyed with myself for even asking this because I feel silly. But help me please. I really am in a place where I'm willing to do whatever needs to be done to be healthy, and lose weight, so I don't want to make any excuses for myself or get in my own way! Do I just need to chill the heck out or does something need to change?


bargoo
04-26-2012, 11:37 AM
No, you don't have to count calories but IMO you will have better success if you do.
I plan my meals for the day staying within my calorie allotment. I do not have to think about each meal when I sit down to eat as I have already counted my calories for each meal. Once you get used to planning your daily menus you will find it doesn't take that long, I spend about 5 minutes a day planning my meals. In the evening I plan my meals for the next day . If I am unable to do that I do it early in the morning. When I got up this morning I knew exactly what I will be eating today. I don't think that is obsessive, just smart planning.

threenorns
04-26-2012, 11:39 AM
yep.

until you retrain your eating habits, you have to measure and count everything.

but seriously - plan your food out the day before, make sure you've weighed everything properly, and don't go recounting and recounting. your body isn't THAT concerned with +/- a few calories here and there. you might even consider preparing your food the day before and keeping them in the fridge in containers labelled "breakfast", "lunch", "dinner", etc - and then you don't have to keep reworking and recalculating.


delyn
04-26-2012, 11:41 AM
you don't HAVE to. i lost weight without counting calories, and just trying to eat healthier, but it did help a lot more when i did count them & had a food journal just so i could be sure of what i was eating.

how did you count them before? there's lots of apps/websites you could use (if you haven't yet), that make counting calories really easy & fast.

maybe if you don't want to count or be strict about it, you should at least keep track of what you're eating though. it will help a lot in the long run.

LockItUp
04-26-2012, 11:52 AM
@delyn - I had been using sparkpeople.com, and I do really like that website.

I guess it will be a matter of planning and counting and leaving it at that and not letting it consume my day!

JohnP
04-26-2012, 12:50 PM
You absolutely do not have to count calories.

You do need to limit your calories one way or another because contrary to popular mythology calories are the reason one gains or loses fat.

Thus, if you do not want to count calories you will need to follow some strict rules instead. What those rules are is really up to you.

I typcially suggest that people who do not want to count calories follow strict Paleo because when you're eating meat and vegtables only it is going to be pretty difficult to over eat. However South Beach or Atkins are other low carb diets that also tend to make it difficult to go to high on the calories as well and have a little more flexibility on food choices.

Counting calories allows for one to be quite flexible in food choices but if you're going to obsess than it is counter productive.

I haven't counted calories for about 18 months and I've been able to maintain but I haven't been able to get to my goal weight either. I did count calories for over a year straight so I have a reasonable idea of how many calories various foods have and I don't eat many calorie dense foods like pizza except on rare occasion.

Feel free to experiment a little and find what will work for you.

Side note: there is no benefit to doing any kind of a clense or detox diet.

LockItUp
04-26-2012, 12:54 PM
@JohnP - I'm glad you commented! I did gain a benefit from the "detox diet" in that I realized how much better I felt not eating crappy foods, so in that sense it was beneficial for me, but I see what you are saying. I will give counting another shot and see if I can do it without getting obsessed. If not I will just have to consider going Paleo. Thanks for you feedback!

rainydays
04-26-2012, 12:54 PM
I would also shoot for a range if it's messing with you so much. Between 1400-1600 (just as an example) is a lot more flexible than 1500 exactly every single day. You're doing great with all of the healthy choices food/exercise wise. Keep it up!

JohnP
04-26-2012, 01:06 PM
@JohnP - I'm glad you commented! I did gain a benefit from the "detox diet" in that I realized how much better I felt not eating crappy foods, so in that sense it was beneficial for me, but I see what you are saying.

I understand what you're saying but the benefit you gained was not from the "detox diet" it was from eliminating crappy processed foods. There is a big difference.

It reminds me of when people talk about how much better they feel when they started eating a vegetarian or vegan diet. When you ask what they were eating before it was donuts, cheeseburgers, fries and other processed garbage.

It's not eliminating meat that made them feel better it was eliminating all the garbage.

(Sorry for the rant this is just a little pet peeve of mine ...)

LockItUp
04-26-2012, 01:11 PM
I understand. And you are right! I have little things that peeve me as well, so I get it.

wannaBfitnessbuff
04-26-2012, 01:25 PM
I agree with most other posters here. You dont have to count calories but if you aren't eating maintence or less your going to gain weight. And if you aren't consuming less calories than you burn you are not going to lose any weight. I have lost weight in the past not counting calories at all. But I had to eat a very strict diet. Like John mentioned, if you are only non starchy fruits veggies and lean protien then its very difficult to eat too may calories. And when I stuck to a strict diet I lost weight a few times in the past, and the loss was successful.

The reason I am counting calories this time is the same reason I am back here and needing to lose weight again. I couldn't transisition to maintenence mode because I didn't know how to limit the unhealthy foods. I know now, from numerous losses and gains, that I can't successfully eat only clean healthy lower G.I. foods all the time. I wish I could, and maybe someday I will get to where I do (I hope so because I believe its the best thing for my health). So this time since I am counting calories, eating something processed or unhealthy doesn't mean uts a loss and I may as well throw in the towel on the day. I feel better, feel more full, and am more successful at meeting my calorie goal when I only eat good nourishing foods, but since I can eat crap and still stay on plan in sorts, well I think this way has more staying power for me. I hope ;).

Good luck and I hope you find a way that works for you!

GlamourGirl827
04-26-2012, 01:28 PM
I understand what you're saying but the benefit you gained was not from the "detox diet" it was from eliminating crappy processed foods. There is a big difference.

It reminds me of when people talk about how much better they feel when they started eating a vegetarian or vegan diet. When you ask what they were eating before it was donuts, cheeseburgers, fries and other processed garbage.

It's not eliminating meat that made them feel better it was eliminating all the garbage.

(Sorry for the rant this is just a little pet peeve of mine ...)

^ I Agree!^

sontaikle
04-26-2012, 01:32 PM
You don't have to count calories, but unless you reduce your caloric intake you won't lose weight.

Like JohnP suggested, a restricted diet like Paleo is a great way to lose weight without counting calories because it's REALLY HARD to overeat on it. Trust me, I went Primal for a while (which is a close cousin to Paleo) and I had a hard time getting all of my calories in to maintain. If I were to not count calories on it I would have lost weight easy.

If you don't want to restrict WHAT you can eat then you have to be accountable somehow. If you don't like calorie counting, you can try an exchange plan. I don't know much about them, but other members have had success with them.

missphalange
04-26-2012, 01:33 PM
To the OP: No, you don't have to count calories, but you must be mindful of what you are eating in some fashion, as others have stated. SBD, McDougall, and the WW simply filling technique all have livable plans that limit the types of food you can eat, but do not require calorie counting.

I understand what you're saying but the benefit you gained was not from the "detox diet" it was from eliminating crappy processed foods. There is a big difference.

It reminds me of when people talk about how much better they feel when they started eating a vegetarian or vegan diet. When you ask what they were eating before it was donuts, cheeseburgers, fries and other processed garbage.

It's not eliminating meat that made them feel better it was eliminating all the garbage.

(Sorry for the rant this is just a little pet peeve of mine ...)

JohnP, I respectfully disagree. Many people do, indeed, feel better from the simple elimination of animal products, with no other variables. I, myself, have been a vegetarian for over a decade and recently cut out dairy products and have noticed a huge difference for the better.

TETO, YMMV, etc.

LockItUp
04-26-2012, 01:38 PM
Right now I am eating mainly veg, some fruits, lean meats, some nuts, and some oils (EVOO and Coconut); I'm not very familiar with Paleo but it seems along those lines from what little I've read in the past 20 minutes? I haven't been eating any grains or legumes, wait are peas a legume? Anyway, I wouldn't mind tightening up my diet as to avoid the calorie counting especially if I'm basically eating along the lines of Paleo anyway (just googled Paleo food list).

tribalgirl
04-26-2012, 01:46 PM
I agree with the people who say you don't need to count calories. I used to be very strict on counting calories and eating foods I should have stayed away from, my calories were always used up before dinner.

I check calories on certian foods that I am not familiar with, but overall I just eat lots and lots of veggies and lean protein, low or non-fat dairy and a few nuts, seeds and whole grains thrown in. it's impossible for me to get too many calories when I do this. I'd rather be full on healthy foods than feel hungry and deprived which always makes me go off plan.

tribalgirl
04-26-2012, 01:54 PM
I just checked out the paleo food list too, I'm pretty much following that and didn't even know it. :)

I started out on SBD, but the Paleo plan is really well rounded and seems to be more of a change in lifestyle than a restrictive plan.

Thanks to whoever brought up the Paleo diet, I'm definitely going to check into it.

missphalange
04-26-2012, 01:56 PM
Right now I am eating mainly veg, some fruits, lean meats, some nuts, and some oils (EVOO and Coconut); I'm not very familiar with Paleo but it seems along those lines from what little I've read in the past 20 minutes? I haven't been eating any grains or legumes, wait are peas a legume? Anyway, I wouldn't mind tightening up my diet as to avoid the calorie counting especially if I'm basically eating along the lines of Paleo anyway (just googled Paleo food list).

The one thing I would, personally, be concerned about is the nuts and oils. It's easy to overdo it on those types of foods and not even realize and the fats & calories add up quickly.

LockItUp
04-26-2012, 01:58 PM
The one thing I would, personally, be concerned about is the nuts and oils. It's easy to overdo it on those types of foods and not even realize and the fats & calories add up quickly.



You are totally right!!! It can be very easy to add several hundred calories very quickly!

krampus
04-26-2012, 02:07 PM
No, but it's good to know which foods have how many calories. I have always thought measuring and weighing your food is too anal-retentive and OCD. You're off to a good start, focusing on eating "real" food is an important step - like sontaikle mentioned, it's hard to eat yourself 1000 calories over maintenance levels on vegetables and chicken breast!

Munchy
04-26-2012, 02:22 PM
I just try to eat mostly whole foods, half of my meals are veggies, but I do need to count calories in order to be more accountable.

I can easily eat maintenance instead of eating to lose by having just a few hundred more calories (an extra drizzle of olive oil in a pan, 1/2T of peanut butter, a few extra nuts, or a little extra hummus).

Calorie counting is the way it works for me, but I know that eating whole foods makes it that much easier so I stay satisfied.

munchievictim
04-26-2012, 02:23 PM
Hey :) I agree with everyone in one way or another, but all i can give is my experience. The thing is, there are tons of different methods to lose weight, and all are acceptable, but the only WAY to lose weight is calories in vs calories out. There's really a whole lot of room for interpretation there, which is wonderful, because it means you can find exactly what works for you. The bad part is, no one can tell you exactly what will work for you, only what works for them. Vegetarianism, Paleo, South Beach, calorie counting will ALL work in the aspect of calories in/calories out, but you have to consider the factors of your own psychological and emotional connections with food and eating, your schedule, etc.
For me, calorie counting is the only way to go. Right now, I lack the ability to "eat intuitively" (I'm jealous of people who can and suspicious that it's all a huge myth...lol), although I hope that through this long and beautiful journey I will be able to learn that skill. But some maintainers will tell you that they never do, they always count calories, so who knows. I find that calorie counting keeps me honest, which is good because I have a tendency to lie to myself, which is exactly how I got to 262 lbs. I guess I'm probably what normal people might call a little "obsessive" about calorie counting, I plan meals out and tweak them and spend considerable energy on figuring out the very best way to use my calories each day, and I feel better if I have tomorrow already planned out when I go to bed. But the way I figure it, I thought about food obsessively before, and at least now I'm directing that focus in a positive way for my health and well-being. So it doesn't bother me. I think my fiancÚ finds it a little weird but he supports me anyway :)
The question is, are you confident in your ability to eat intuitively and not overeat, or do you still need to be actively aware of exactly how many calories you eat? If I had been stalled for two weeks, I would experiment with my calorie intake, and maybe try calorie counting for a week to see if the scale starts moving again, and that will probably answer this question for you.
However, if it's more comfortable to you to hang out at the same weight for awhile while you learn to eat a good diet of whole foods and eat healthily without counting every morsel, that may be very beneficial for you. This whole journey is one of discovery, and you are coming face to face with all the little quirks of your body. I think if you just make small adjustments, and stay aware of how your body reacts to them, you will figure out what you have to do to achieve your goals. Definitely absorb the advice on here from our fabulous maintainers, because they are experts, and there are many times I should have taken their advice and thought I knew better and regretted that later. But in the end, no one can give you their plan that helped them lose a hundred pounds or however much, and you follow it and be guaranteed the same results. Every single plan will WORK, what matters is what works for you so that you don't feel obsessed or deprived. For me, following strict rules about the food I can eat is a sure fire way to feel deprived and eventually binge. Calorie counting allows me to eat whatever I'm craving, learn moderation and portion sizes, and figure out how to eat for maintenance and be prepared and informed to eat out in the real world. On the other hand, by the time I get to maintenance I want to have eliminated processed foods and eat only whole, organic foods. But right now, I'm still learning, and calorie counting is a god send.
Good luck hon :hug:

wannaBfitnessbuff
04-26-2012, 02:39 PM
munchievictum- Exactly how I feel! This is why I have to count calories. But kudos to all who can follow a plan strictly and lose weight AND keep it off without counting calories.

JohnP
04-26-2012, 02:45 PM
JohnP, I respectfully disagree. Many people do, indeed, feel better from the simple elimination of animal products, with no other variables. I, myself, have been a vegetarian for over a decade and recently cut out dairy products and have noticed a huge difference for the better.

We don't disagree at all. You took what I wrote, made up an argument I wasn't making and you disagreed with it.

I never argued that one could not benefit from eliminating a specific food or food group from their diet. It simply depends on the individual and the context.

My pet peeve is when one goes from eating crap to eating a certain diet and then argues that the certain diet (usually it is vegan or paleo people making this argument) is what made them feel good when it was actually they stopped eating crap. It's like they found a new religion.

Do you see the difference?

munchievictim
04-26-2012, 02:52 PM
WannaB- I definitely admire the people who don't need to log everything they eat, but I feel like this is a huge project I'm running and that includes data and paperwork. When I'm just going "blind" (which is how I feel if I don't plan and count) everything falls apart.

threenorns
04-26-2012, 02:53 PM
JohnP, I respectfully disagree. Many people do, indeed, feel better from the simple elimination of animal products, with no other variables. I, myself, have been a vegetarian for over a decade and recently cut out dairy products and have noticed a huge difference for the better.

TETO, YMMV, etc.


was going to say but JohnP beat me to it.

*you* feel a benefit from being a vegetarian without dairy. my bff, also, *loves* being a vegetarian.

i cannot be a vegetarian - on my restricted calorie diet, two of the things that fell by the wayside were red meat and dairy. they're too calorie-dense to sustain in any great quantity on a VLCD so i swapped them out for shrimp (which i love) and fish and eggs (both of which i hate)...

and now i'm anaemic.

AGAIN.

this is the 4th time i've tried something even approaching vegetarianism and i always end up with some pretty yucky consequences. meanwhile, my bff cannot even eat hidden meats (such as the ham her bf snuck into her beloved potato salad because he thought he was oh, so funny) - she has lost the ability to digest meat completely so ends up with gas, bloating, and cramps.

just because vegetarian works for you and her doesn't mean it's THE answer - it just means it works for you guys.


and as johnp said, you're arguing something that wasn't even mentioned: all he said was that going from a crap-loaded diet to ANY diet that doesn't have crap is going to make you feel better.

ANY diet. it doesn't necessarily follow that the one you chose is the holy grail - someone who went paleo and feels fabulous would probably feel equally fabulous on atkins, south beach, weight watchers, or heck, even cabbage soup because it's not what they ARE eating that made the difference, it's what they're not eating any more.

munchievictim
04-26-2012, 02:56 PM
My pet peeve is when one goes from eating crap to eating a certain diet and then argues that the certain diet (usually it is vegan or paleo people making this argument) is what made them feel good when it was actually they stopped eating crap. It's like they found a new religion.


I agree, I think people have a tendency to miss the forest for the trees with weight loss. They focus more on one particular method instead of the broader idea of the basic science of dieting, and it stands in the way of enlightenment and complete understanding of good nutrition.

JohnP
04-26-2012, 03:00 PM
I agree, I think people have a tendency to miss the forest for the trees with weight loss. They focus more on one particular method instead of the broader idea of the basic science of dieting, and it stands in the way of enlightenment and complete understanding of good nutrition.

Very eloquently stated.

munchievictim
04-26-2012, 03:19 PM
Very eloquently stated.

:) sometimes my english major shows. Lol.

missphalange
04-26-2012, 03:34 PM
We don't disagree at all. You took what I wrote, made up an argument I wasn't making and you disagreed with it.

I never argued that one could not benefit from eliminating a specific food or food group from their diet. It simply depends on the individual and the context.

My pet peeve is when one goes from eating crap to eating a certain diet and then argues that the certain diet (usually it is vegan or paleo people making this argument) is what made them feel good when it was actually they stopped eating crap. It's like they found a new religion.

Do you see the difference?

I see no arguement, only a discussion.

My response was to this statement:

"It's not eliminating meat that made them feel better it was eliminating all the garbage."

Which is why I said:

"Many people do, indeed, feel better from the simple elimination of animal products, with no other variables."

Sure, you may have just been using veg*nism as an example, but to a casual observer of your statement, they may misconstrue the message you were trying to convey, i.e.:

"My pet peeve is when one goes from eating crap to eating a certain diet and then argues that the certain diet (usually it is vegan or paleo people making this argument) is what made them feel good when it was actually they stopped eating crap."

missphalange
04-26-2012, 03:36 PM
was going to say but JohnP beat me to it.

*you* feel a benefit from being a vegetarian without dairy. my bff, also, *loves* being a vegetarian.

i cannot be a vegetarian - on my restricted calorie diet, two of the things that fell by the wayside were red meat and dairy. they're too calorie-dense to sustain in any great quantity on a VLCD so i swapped them out for shrimp (which i love) and fish and eggs (both of which i hate)...

and now i'm anaemic.

AGAIN.

this is the 4th time i've tried something even approaching vegetarianism and i always end up with some pretty yucky consequences. meanwhile, my bff cannot even eat hidden meats (such as the ham her bf snuck into her beloved potato salad because he thought he was oh, so funny) - she has lost the ability to digest meat completely so ends up with gas, bloating, and cramps.

just because vegetarian works for you and her doesn't mean it's THE answer - it just means it works for you guys.


and as johnp said, you're arguing something that wasn't even mentioned: all he said was that going from a crap-loaded diet to ANY diet that doesn't have crap is going to make you feel better.

ANY diet. it doesn't necessarily follow that the one you chose is the holy grail - someone who went paleo and feels fabulous would probably feel equally fabulous on atkins, south beach, weight watchers, or heck, even cabbage soup because it's not what they ARE eating that made the difference, it's what they're not eating any more.

I never said it was THE answer. Please see my last response to John for more clarification.

Kery
04-27-2012, 03:59 AM
I stopped calories counting because in the end, it had a nasty effect on me, sending me into an all-or-nothing mode in which I had become even afraid of eating apples because "OMG it's 90 calories!!" (and when you start thinking like that, it IS time to stop).

But! I'm not saying it necessarily happens to everybody, and I will also readily admit that in the beginning, it helped me a lot to retrain my bad food habits and gain some hindsight. I don't really need to count anymore now because I know approximately what I can eat freely (green beans, that kind of stuff) and what I need to keep to rare occurrences (not only junk food, but i.e. the amount of meat in a meal--I really don't need a 300g steak or six spoons of melted cheese on my pasta where one is enough for me to be satisfied).

It really all depends. Maybe one thing you can do is to keep track in the beginning of your usual foods--we all have foods we like to eat more often than others, I suppose--so that you know what they're made of, so to say, and after a while you won't need to count because, well, you'll just know. And only track 'unusual' foods whose amount of calories you don't know (well)? Then, if you find that it doesn't work, you can come back to fully counting; or, on the other hand, if you develop good intuitive eating, you won't need to, or not so much. Not sure, but that's the idea that comes to mind right now.

Samantha18
04-27-2012, 04:15 AM
It's definitely possible! People in the old days didn't count calories, yet they were thin and didn't have the obesity problems we have today. So I don't see how counting calories is a necessity in any way. You need to do what is best for you!

I think you would have to train your mind a bit. My step-dad was 60 pounds over-weight as a teen, and he lost weight by taking everything he use to eat and cutting it in half. I've also done this and it works miracles. If you make healthier choices, cut down your portions, and throw in some exercise, I think it's impossible not to lose weight.

Not counting would be incredibly sustainable and you'll get to where you want to go eventually. I recommend checking out the No S diet. It's eating like they did in the old days and how they eat in thin countries, with no calorie counting or cutting out certain foods required.

Beach Patrol
04-27-2012, 12:14 PM
Ok, so here's my question: am I fooling myself into thinking it's possible to NOT count calories and still lose weight? I really really really don't want to have to count!!! But do I just need to bite the bullet?



Of course NOT! - plenty of people lose weight without counting a single calorie. But if what you're CURRENTLY DOING is not quite WORKING FOR YOU, then I suggest finding something that DOES WORK for you. There are HUNDREDS of different "diets" out there. Do some research; diet according to the foods you like, and you won't feel like you're on a "diet". :^:

LockItUp
04-27-2012, 12:55 PM
I so much appreciate everyone's input!!! It helps so much to come on here and hear what other people think! It definitely keeps me sane(er).

I sat down last night and wrote down what I've been doing the last 6 weeks. In the past 2 weeks I've changed my eating pretty drastically, joined a gym and have been working out daily (cardio and weights), and STRESSING way too much. I had been stalled for 9 days. I decided I needed to give myself a break because I'm still adjusting to everything. And today (cue dramatic music) I was DOWN! 204.6, down from 206.8, and below my low last week of 205.

So I'm going to keep doing what I'm doing and kind of take everyone's advice all at once; every few days I'm going to keep a food log and manually count calories to make sure I'm on track. I'm really happy with the way I'm eating, concentrating on whole foods, and I've really enjoined NOT counting calories. But I do think I need it to keep me in check, so the happy medium of doing it every few days I think will be perfect.

Again, thanks everyone!!!

Vex
04-27-2012, 01:15 PM
I think it's a good you found a happy medium. You can adjust it if your weight doesn't go where you want it to.

There are a few benefits to calorie counting that should be mentioned imo. If for some reason you are not losing weight, it's pretty handy to have the calorie record available to figure out if you need to adjust it.

Also, for some people there's some sort of psychological connection between writing (or typing) down calories - some sort of thing that makes the brain click and really "get" what you're eating. I can't explain that or prove it, I just know that it makes a huge difference for me and some other people.

.

KittyKatFan
04-27-2012, 09:48 PM
I find counting calories to be very helpful. However, a few years ago I followed the South Beach diet and appreciated not having to count calories. I found the diet to be tough on y digestive system--I still blame the South Beach and Atkins diets (which also doesn't make you count cals) for the kidney stones I developed.

Weight Watchers doesn't make you count calories either, just points.

shcirerf
04-28-2012, 12:37 AM
Whatever way you choose, you are going to have to count. Be it calories or Weight Watcher points, or macro nutrients, or carbs, or exercise, or whatever, you have to count it in some way.

The key is to do, what you can live with and make a permanent lifestyle!:D

Elladorine
04-28-2012, 01:06 AM
I also get horribly obsessed when I count calories; I once made myself anorexic when I was younger, before giving up entirely and going back to the weight I'd originally struggled with, and later gaining even more.

But fortunately for me, I've lost over 100 pounds without actually counting them. Instead, I try to be "calorie aware" by checking labels at the store and looking up the healthier options ahead of time when eating out (so I don't get counter-productive by accidentally eating a 1000+ calorie meal in one setting, which is way too easy to do). It's hard to overdo your calories on veggies alone, which I eat a lot of. I have smaller servings of fruit, proteins, and fats, and mostly try to stay away from processed food. I definitely stay away from processed sugar and other white carbs as much as possible, which seems to keep most of my cravings in check. I keep a pretty daily planner and write all my meals and snacks down in it. Once again, I don't count calories, but enjoy the process of tracking what I eat so I look back to see my progress and keep an eye out for any hiccups along the way. :)