General chatter - HPV Vaccine..




View Full Version : HPV Vaccine..


aseret123
04-23-2012, 08:28 PM
Hey everyone! Another thread just got me thinking - how many of you here have had the HPV vaccine? Or would be willing to get it or let your child have it? I've had it myself and suffered no ill effects, but it seems lots of people have strong opinions against it. I wonder if I would have still had it if I'd researched it more thoroughly. Thoughts?

Hope everyone had a great weekend :)


luckymommy
04-23-2012, 08:34 PM
I personally would never get it. I have a friend whose daughter started having terrible migraines after she had it. I know that's anecdotal but I've also researched it and it only protects against a very small percentage of the cervical cancer strains. I think it's a personal decision. Also, nobody knows how long it lasts so giving it to young kids seems pointless to me since they're not likely to get cervical cancer at a young age anyway. I think adults should make this decision for themselves. I'm not going to get into a debate about this issue because I know it's a hot topic but this is just my own personal opinion. I'm glad you didn't have any ill effects. :)

Brandis
04-23-2012, 09:50 PM
People have become so antivaccine because we are at a time when we now can be. Many people are now gone that remembered and lived when the iron lung was in effect and when smallpox ravaged the earth. I think it is a decision I would have to think about for vaccinating my child. I myself sign up for yearly flu vaccines, and am current on tetanus, hepatitis and everything else. The vaccine is designed to work against the most common strains of hpv causing cervical cancer. HPV is a virus that gets into the cells of the cervix, and lives there for years before causing cancer. So years go by, more people are infected, and the cancer happens later. The infection is often contracted when people are young and maybe not thinking about condom use. So the question is, do you subject your child to a vaccine, or do you worry they will get a potentially cancer-causing virus? That is a hard question to answer, and I guess every parent has to make the decision for themselves. If I was not married, I would most likely get the vaccine. I have had some abnormal pap smears(HPV negative), and I don't have mass media induced vaccine fears. But I have had no issues with vaccines. I did however suffer an environmentally induced autoimmune disease from occupational chemical exposure combined with sunlight. So I am wary of pesticides, herbicides, root inducers and fertilizers. But that is just one person's opinion. Take care.


sontaikle
04-23-2012, 09:55 PM
I would get it if I had insurance.

Which I should next month or at the very least later this year. I plan to run to the doctor and grab any vaccines I might have missed in my insurance gap.

People seem to be against it because they feel it promotes sexual promiscuity. Personally I would rather be safe than sorry, even if my chances of getting it are low (fiance and I are virgins, haha. We'll do the deed eventually...when we get around to it :lol:)

Samantha18
04-23-2012, 10:05 PM
I got it, and will probably have my kids get it too if I have them someday. My mom pretty much made me get it, though I'm glad I did now.

It protects against the strains that cause cervical cancer. I don't see how it's any different than protecting against the others things we get vaccination for, such as hepatitis. My only objection would be that it's a new vaccine, but all medicine has to be new at one point, and the vaccines we already have were new once upon a time also.

dakotamidnight
04-23-2012, 10:14 PM
Nope. I was offered it and declined, and my daughter won't be getting it either. We have a strong history of auto-immune disorders in our family as well as autism, and we no longer do any vaccines. I actually am under medical orders to not receive most vaccines {and for my daughter not to as well} due to my auto-immune thyroid issues causing me to have a suppressed immune system.

aseret123
04-23-2012, 10:15 PM
Thank you for your opinions! They're all making interesting reading. It must be very difficult to make a decision like this for your child.

I was 16 when I had the first shot nearly 4 years ago, so by that time I didn't need a guardians permission - my mother was fully supportive of whatever decision I made anyway. I just feel that I could have been better educated about it; medical professionals came to our school and vaccinated every girl (with permission) between the ages of 12 and 18. We were given a leaflet explaining what the vaccine was for but there was no mention of potential side effects. I guess I should have done my own research - though to be honest even if I'd known, I probably would have still had the vaccine. I know that a lot of girls have suffered ill effects but this is most likely a small amount of people compared to how many have actually been vaccinated. Hundreds of girls at my school had the vaccine and as far as I know no one had any side effects, apart from being unable to lift our arms too high for a couple of days! I definitely understand how it could cause worry though.

nelie
04-23-2012, 10:18 PM
I don't have it but I would get it if I ever became single again. Vaccines tend to be more beneficial than harmful. It seems like an easy way to help prevent a common cancer.

ValRock
04-23-2012, 10:26 PM
NOPE NEVER.

As the mother of a vaccine injured child. NO. NO NO NOOOOO no no no. NO.

threenorns
04-23-2012, 11:01 PM
i, too, have a vaccine injured child - no way on this green earth or any other planet under any circumstances EVER will i have my jabbed with anything ever again.

my oldest daughter was *fine* until she had a massive reaction to a vaccine as an infant. she stopped gaining weight and when she was a young adult, all her diagnoses were resolved into one: asperger's.

i didn't get my second daughter vaccinated at all until i was (mis)informed (illegally so) that she "had" to have her vaccines to go to school. she was given all of them in two whacking doses one month apart at the age of 4. she didn't have a massive reaction (with the fever and the swelling and the convulsions) like her sister - but it was nearly two weeks after each shot before she was "normal" again. that whole time, she was lethargic, lackadaisical, off her feed, and just plain dozy. she was in grade 10 when my "stunned fish" daughter was revealed to have an IQ "comfortably" in the genius level - with reading at a post-doctorate level and math at a grade 4, writing at grade 5.

my youngest had the first 3 shots but was going the same way - each time, she reacted worse and took longer to recover.

NO.
MORE.

the amount of toxic junk they want to stick into our kids is criminal!

and the HPV vaccine doesn't even do anything - even the FDC says so.

GlamourGirl827
04-23-2012, 11:05 PM
If I wasn't married, absolutely.
And I'd like to say that my son has been diagnose with autism, which has of course been freed from the vaccine relation it once had. (assuming you keep up with current medical literature) But I wanted to mention that.
I have Hashimoto's, and autoimmune thyroid disease.
Psoriasis, also autoimmune.
I am a registered nurse.
I have a another son who is typical.
We are all up to date on all vaccines offered.

And I stand by vaccinating.
If I had a daughter, she would get it.

ValRock
04-23-2012, 11:08 PM
They haven't even found a proven link between HPV and cancer, OR proven that vaccine even prevents the kind of HPV that may or may not cause cancer.

Not worth the risk.

MOST people clear HPV on their own. Not worth the risk.

berryblondeboys
04-23-2012, 11:11 PM
If I wasn't married, absolutely.
And I'd like to say that my son has been diagnose with autism, which has of course been freed from the vaccine relation it once had. But I wanted to mention that.
I have Hashimoto's, and autoimmune thyroid disease.
Psoriasis, also autoimmune.
I am a registered nurse.
I have a another son who is typical.
We are all up to date on all vaccines offered.

And I stand by vaccinating.
If I had a daughter, she would get it.

Pretty much ditto everything here except I'm not a nurse, but I have a son with autism. I have hypothyroidism and a son who is typical (though ADHD) and if I had a daughter she would get it - without a doubt.

Soon, what will happen is that there will be an outbreak in the United States of some disease that was thought gone or mostly eradicated. Children will suffer and die because their parents felt the risk of vaccinations outweighed the risks of getting the disease. I hope that day doesn't come soon, but it will come.

My mother in law who suffered from polio as a child and has life long struggles because of it could say a few words on it too. She was a ballerina and 15 when she got it - they thought she would never walk again. She's luck she can, but at 76, she's struggling again as her body is finding it harder and harder to cope with the weakened muscles in her legs. And she was a LUCKY one.

GlamourGirl827
04-23-2012, 11:18 PM
Soon, what will happen is that there will be an outbreak in the United States of some disease that was thought gone or mostly eradicated. Children will suffer and die because their parents felt the risk of vaccinations outweighed the risks of getting the disease. I hope that day doesn't come soon, but it will come.

.

^ THIS^ !!!!!

nelie
04-23-2012, 11:19 PM
They haven't even found a proven link between HPV and cancer, OR proven that vaccine even prevents the kind of HPV that may or may not cause cancer.

Not worth the risk.

MOST people clear HPV on their own. Not worth the risk.

I would say that HPV is one of the more optional vaccinations but they have proven HPV can cause cancer. The vaccines cover the most frequent kinds of HPV that causes cancer.

These are a couple good reads about it
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/HPV
http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/cancer.html

GlamourGirl827
04-23-2012, 11:28 PM
They haven't even found a proven link between HPV and cancer, OR proven that vaccine even prevents the kind of HPV that may or may not cause cancer.
.

^Can you cite your reference? Because I have several database full of medical journals that cite research showing the opposite.

"What causes cervical cancer?
It is necessary (although not sufficient) to have a persistent
infection of the cervix with a high-risk or oncogenic HPV
(hrHPV) virus to develop cervical cancer. It has been shown
that virtually all cervical cancers test positive for HPV DNA
and that the attributable risk of HPV for cervical cancer is
higher than smoking is for lung cancer and Hepatitis B virus
is for liver cancer.1..."

Carter J, Ding Z, Rose B. HPV infection and cervical disease: a review. The Australian & New Zealand Journal Of Obstetrics & Gynaecology [serial online]. April 2011;51(2):103-108. Available from: MEDLINE, Ipswich, MA. Accessed April 23, 2012.

I'm actually in the process of doing a paper for school on this topic. Not the HPV vaccine, but health information on the web. Part of it I am focusing on misinformation. See you made a statement, I don't know where you read that since a quick journal search shows that your statement is wrong. But assuming I was just a random person looking for info, and not a nurse with access to these databases, I might believe your statement, and that may affect my health care decision. Heck, this whole thread is people's opinions on getting a vaccine. But how many people on this thread are even educated to advise that? This is great though. Helps further prove the point I'm making in the paper I'm writing.

Ugh, I can go on and on about this...that's why I chose it as my research topic...

ValRock
04-23-2012, 11:39 PM
^Can you cite your reference? Because I have several database full of medical journals that cite research showing the opposite.

"What causes cervical cancer?
It is necessary (although not sufficient) to have a persistent
infection of the cervix with a high-risk or oncogenic HPV
(hrHPV) virus to develop cervical cancer. It has been shown
that virtually all cervical cancers test positive for HPV DNA
and that the attributable risk of HPV for cervical cancer is
higher than smoking is for lung cancer and Hepatitis B virus
is for liver cancer.1..."

Carter J, Ding Z, Rose B. HPV infection and cervical disease: a review. The Australian & New Zealand Journal Of Obstetrics & Gynaecology [serial online]. April 2011;51(2):103-108. Available from: MEDLINE, Ipswich, MA. Accessed April 23, 2012.

I'm actually in the process of doing a paper for school on this topic. Not the HPV vaccine, but health information on the web. Part of it I am focusing on misinformation. See you made a statement, I don't know where you read that since a quick journal search shows that your statement is wrong. But assuming I was just a random person looking for info, and not a nurse with access to these databases, I might believe your statement, and that may affect my health care decision. Heck, this whole thread is people's opinions on getting a vaccine. But how many people on this thread are even educated to advise that? This is great though. Helps further prove the point I'm making in the paper I'm writing.

Ugh, I can go on and on about this...that's why I chose it as my research topic...

I've also written a paper on this. I'll gather my sources for you now.

ValRock
04-24-2012, 12:13 AM
Please excuse my lazy citations. I'm supposed to be studying for finals and I don't have access to all my sources at home.

“no set of viral genes is consistently present or expressed in human cervical cancers. [345] … HPV does not replicate in the cancer cells.”

Latent Viruses and Mutated Oncogenes: No Evidence for Pathogenicity
Peter H. Duesberg and Jody R. Schwartz

"The theory behind the vaccine is sound: If HPV infection can be prevented, cancer will not occur. But in practice the issue is more complex. First, there are more than 100 different types of HPV and at least 15 of them are oncogenic. The current vaccines target only 2 oncogenic strains: HPV-16 and HPV-18. Second, the relationship between infection at a young age and development of cancer 20 to 40 years later is not known. HPV is the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection, with an estimated 79% infection rate over a lifetime5​,6 The virus does not appear to be very harmful because almost all HPV infections are cleared by the immune system.7​,8 In a few women, infection persists and some women may develop precancerous cervical lesions and eventually cervical cancer. It is currently impossible to predict in which women this will occur and why. Likewise, it is impossible to predict exactly what effect vaccination of young girls and women will have on the incidence of cervical cancer 20 to 40 years from now. The true effect of the vaccine can be determined only through clinical trials and long-term follow-up."

JAMA. 2009;302(7):795-796. doi: 10.1001/jama.2009.1215
The Risks and Benefits of HPV Vaccination
Charlotte Haug, MD, PhD, MSc

"Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey revealed a 26.8% overall HPV prevalence among US girls and women, with increasing prevalence each year for ages 14 to 24 years (44.8% for ages 20-24 years) followed by a gradual decline in prevalence through age 59 years (19.6% for ages 50-59 years).4 Although infection with high-risk HPV types is necessary for the development of cervical cancer (detected in 99% of cervical cancers),5​ high-risk types 16 and 18 have a relatively low prevalence (3.4% of all HPV infections),4 and not all women who are infected with high-risk HPV types will develop cervical cancer. Approximately 90% of women with new HPV infections clear the infection within 2 years"

JAMA. 2007;297(17):1921-1923. doi: 10.1001/jama.297.17.1921
Mandatory HPV Vaccination
Public Health vs Private Wealth
Lawrence O. Gostin, JD, LLD; Catherine D. DeAngelis, MD, MPH

"All drugs are associated with some risks of adverse reactions. Because vaccines represent a special category of drugs, generally given to healthy individuals, uncertain benefits mean that only a small level of risk for adverse reactions is acceptable. Furthermore, medical ethics demand that vaccination should be carried out with the participant's full and informed consent. This necessitates an objective disclosure of the known or foreseeable vaccination benefits and risks. The way in which HPV vaccines are often promoted to women indicates that such disclosure is not always given from the basis of the best available knowledge. For example, while the world's leading medical authorities state that HPV vaccines are an important cervical cancer prevention tool, clinical trials show no evidence that HPV vaccination can protect against cervical cancer. Similarly, contrary to claims that cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide, existing data show that this only applies to developing countries. In the Western world cervical cancer is a rare disease with mortality rates that are several times lower than the rate of reported serious adverse reactions (including deaths) from HPV vaccination. Future vaccination policies should adhere more rigorously to evidence-based medicine and ethical guidelines for informed consent."

Tomljenovic L, Shaw CA
Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine policy and evidence-based medicine: Are they at odds? [JOURNAL ARTICLE]
Ann Med 2011 Dec 22.

I'll leave it at that... because I don't want to get into this, but you asked for sources. I really should avoid these discussions.

I wish happiness and health to EVERYONE!!! <3 :)

Violet73
04-24-2012, 12:36 AM
My DD will not be getting this vaccine. There have been extreme side effects reported, even death. 71 deaths reported of people who have received the vaccine. Mostly female, some male. This came from the CDC website. They also state not all are confirmed to be due to the vaccine and blah, blah, blah. Tell that to the parents of these kids. There is website (just google) some mothers have created about this vaccine. Their children were completely fine until they received it.

I'm not against all vaccines. We get a flu shot every year and she has had all other vaccines. It has nothing to do with worrying about her having sex either. I just do not like the risks involving in this vaccine.

mariposssa
04-24-2012, 01:15 AM
My daughter hasn't had it and the last time the doctor asked (again) I told her if I change my mind I'll let you know...meantime please stop asking. :dizzy:

Suzanne 3FC
04-24-2012, 01:40 AM
One of my best friends had HPV as a teenager, and was diagnosed with cervical cancer as an adult. Another friend received HPV from her philandering husband while in her early 20s. She later developed cancer as well.

If I had a daughter, I would strongly recommend the vaccination - single or married.

alyssarof2012
04-24-2012, 01:55 AM
I have had all 3 rounds of the hpv vaccine. (Just got my last one two months ago.) I have no negative feelings towards it and haven't experienced any side effects...

Edit: Not sure if this matters, but I'm 18. Got my first hpv shot when I was like...... 16 or 17..

PrincessSophia
04-24-2012, 02:14 AM
One of my best friends had HPV as a teenager, and was diagnosed with cervical cancer as an adult. Another friend received HPV from her philandering husband while in her early 20s. She later developed cancer as well.

If I had a daughter, I would strongly recommend the vaccination - single or married.

yes. I have friends who died from cervical cancer. :(

I vaccinated my daughter when she was 12 and my sons will get it too. I have been vaccinated too because found out that I dont have any HPV.

Upd: my son was diagnosed with autism too but it is proven now there is no connection between vaccines and autism.

Violet73
04-24-2012, 07:28 AM
just remember, you can have cervical cancer without having HPV. Cancer can develop anywhere on your body at any time. A friend of mine had cervical cancer and tested negative for HPV. It was caught early and she had a cone biopsy and has had no recurrence or problems since.

GlamourGirl827
04-24-2012, 07:51 AM
Please excuse my lazy citations. I'm supposed to be studying for finals and I don't have access to all my sources at home.

“no set of viral genes is consistently present or expressed in human cervical cancers. [345] … HPV does not replicate in the cancer cells.”

Latent Viruses and Mutated Oncogenes: No Evidence for Pathogenicity
Peter H. Duesberg and Jody R. Schwartz

"The theory behind the vaccine is sound: If HPV infection can be prevented, cancer will not occur. But in practice the issue is more complex. First, there are more than 100 different types of HPV and at least 15 of them are oncogenic. The current vaccines target only 2 oncogenic strains: HPV-16 and HPV-18. Second, the relationship between infection at a young age and development of cancer 20 to 40 years later is not known. HPV is the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection, with an estimated 79% infection rate over a lifetime5​,6 The virus does not appear to be very harmful because almost all HPV infections are cleared by the immune system.7​,8 In a few women, infection persists and some women may develop precancerous cervical lesions and eventually cervical cancer. It is currently impossible to predict in which women this will occur and why. Likewise, it is impossible to predict exactly what effect vaccination of young girls and women will have on the incidence of cervical cancer 20 to 40 years from now. The true effect of the vaccine can be determined only through clinical trials and long-term follow-up."

JAMA. 2009;302(7):795-796. doi: 10.1001/jama.2009.1215
The Risks and Benefits of HPV Vaccination
Charlotte Haug, MD, PhD, MSc

"Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey revealed a 26.8% overall HPV prevalence among US girls and women, with increasing prevalence each year for ages 14 to 24 years (44.8% for ages 20-24 years) followed by a gradual decline in prevalence through age 59 years (19.6% for ages 50-59 years).4 Although infection with high-risk HPV types is necessary for the development of cervical cancer (detected in 99% of cervical cancers),5​ high-risk types 16 and 18 have a relatively low prevalence (3.4% of all HPV infections),4 and not all women who are infected with high-risk HPV types will develop cervical cancer. Approximately 90% of women with new HPV infections clear the infection within 2 years"

JAMA. 2007;297(17):1921-1923. doi: 10.1001/jama.297.17.1921
Mandatory HPV Vaccination
Public Health vs Private Wealth
Lawrence O. Gostin, JD, LLD; Catherine D. DeAngelis, MD, MPH

"All drugs are associated with some risks of adverse reactions. Because vaccines represent a special category of drugs, generally given to healthy individuals, uncertain benefits mean that only a small level of risk for adverse reactions is acceptable. Furthermore, medical ethics demand that vaccination should be carried out with the participant's full and informed consent. This necessitates an objective disclosure of the known or foreseeable vaccination benefits and risks. The way in which HPV vaccines are often promoted to women indicates that such disclosure is not always given from the basis of the best available knowledge. For example, while the world's leading medical authorities state that HPV vaccines are an important cervical cancer prevention tool, clinical trials show no evidence that HPV vaccination can protect against cervical cancer. Similarly, contrary to claims that cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide, existing data show that this only applies to developing countries. In the Western world cervical cancer is a rare disease with mortality rates that are several times lower than the rate of reported serious adverse reactions (including deaths) from HPV vaccination. Future vaccination policies should adhere more rigorously to evidence-based medicine and ethical guidelines for informed consent."

Tomljenovic L, Shaw CA
Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine policy and evidence-based medicine: Are they at odds? [JOURNAL ARTICLE]
Ann Med 2011 Dec 22.

I'll leave it at that... because I don't want to get into this, but you asked for sources. I really should avoid these discussions.

I wish happiness and health to EVERYONE!!! <3 :)

Thank you! And I really mean it. :) If there's evidence proving otherwise, I am happy to read it and keep up with current info. Its so rare anyone one message boards actually reads from reputable sources. I would like to read these in full when I can. (Not now, got to get the kids to school) But I appreciate sources. I will say that there are sources saying that HPV does cause cervical cancer, obviously since I cited one. So, it would come down to having the time to read all the articles and compare them. But at least I now see there is a disagreement with in the medical community over this.

4star
04-24-2012, 08:31 AM
Well I haven't gotten this one but have most vaccines. Mainly, b/c there is no substitution for safe sex. If a person is being exposed to HPV, there are many other nasties they are being exposed to, including HIV for which there is no vaccine. My worry (beside the really bad side effects that have been reported) is that this will create a false sense of security about safe sex and cervical cancer and people will skip screenings b/c they have the HPV vaccine when it covers only few strains out of over 100 that can be found in cervical cancer. Unfortunately, I feel this vaccine was turned out to the public really quickly and promised a great deal without enough disclosure on side effects. Many people are being mass vaccinated in schools and aren't aware of the disabling side effects possible. I am also interested in what time will show with the side effects in proportion to other vaccines but since it's been released to the public, we won't know til we know en masse. I don't know if anyone remembers the Rotovirus vaccine issues but that initial vaccine had to be recalled b/c of the horrible things happening from it. New meds sometimes are the cutting edge instead of being on the cutting edge...maybe in time, the information will convince me that it's safe and effective but for now, it's too soon to tell IMO.

MrsCake
04-24-2012, 09:40 AM
It is safe to get vaccinated in your early/mid 30's ?

4star
04-24-2012, 10:07 AM
It is safe to get vaccinated in your early/mid 30's ?

You could always ask your doc. Chances are you might have already been exposed and it may not do you much good but then, maybe it could....Your doc will probably give you the go ahead if you don't have any contradicting health issues and your immune system is not compromised.

Obviously, there are other ways to get cervical cancer so you should still be screened.

Callahan
04-24-2012, 10:58 AM
It is safe to get vaccinated in your early/mid 30's ?

The studies were all done on women 26 and under, but there's no reason it wouldn't be safe in your 30s. The bigger issue is that women over 30 are more likely to have been exposed to HPV.

The biggest risk is to your wallet, as insurance companies won't cover vaccination outside of the age range for which the vaccine is approved.

Some more info on HPV: It's correct that there are multiple strains that cause cervical cancer. Generally, if a woman over 30 tests positive for one of the high risk HPV but has an otherwise normal Pap smear, she should have repeat testing in one year (otherwise, if all negative, it would be 3-5). If the lab tests for the specific strain (and many don't), there are two strains for which immediate colposcopy is recommended because the risk of cervical dysplasia is even higher with those two strains. Those are the strains that are included in the HPV vaccines.

MrsCake
04-24-2012, 11:38 AM
Thanks for the answers!

emilyk
04-24-2012, 06:39 PM
I would say that HPV is one of the more optional vaccinations but they have proven HPV can cause cancer. The vaccines cover the most frequent kinds of HPV that causes cancer.

These are a couple good reads about it
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/HPV
http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/cancer.html

Thank you! I hate to see mis-information about this.
3 years ago I had to go through treatment for stage 3 pre-cancer (carcinoma-in-situ) of the vulva related to HPV. I was lucky. I got to keep most of my vulva.
Just this week I was told there was a good chance I had tongue cancer. I was facing the thoughts of losing part or ALL of my tongue. Having to live with a feeding tube and speaking through a stoma. This morning I got the WONDERFUL news that they do not think I have tongue cancer (though I still have months of testing ahead to be sure). It's predicted that by the end of the decade, HPV will be THE leading cause of oral cancers, rather than smoking. Oral cancers have skyrocketed 277% since the late 1980s due to HPV.

I have a son and a daughter. I am VERY leery of new vaccines and I vaccinated both on an alternative schedule to minimize the amounts of CRAP they were exposed to in vaccines. I was waffling about the HPV vaccine but after the week I've had, YES,I will get my children vaccinated.

ERHR
04-25-2012, 01:22 PM
I chose not to get the HPV vaccine, and now that I am 26 I'm aging out of the ideal vaccination window. I am NOT a vaccine denier, but I am married and my husband and I do not have HPV. I hope that by the time I have children the HPV vaccine will have a longer history of efficacy and if so I will have my children vaccinated on whatever the recommended schedule is.

elleohelle
04-25-2012, 02:44 PM
I took the HPV vaccine and I am glad I did. I understand the paranoia about vaccines, but I think that it is unmerited.

Luceia
04-25-2012, 02:58 PM
I also had stage 3 pre-cancer related to HPV. You can bet your sweet lady bits I got my daughter vaccinated.

WebWoman
04-25-2012, 03:48 PM
Yes, they have proven that HPV causes cervical cancer. When they came out with the vaccine, I had my daughter get it, but we discussed it first and she agreed.

It's such a shame that the DPT vaccine damaged so many young ones. I have a neighbor who remembers to the moment when her son seized shortly after receiving this vaccine. He became autistic after that.

tessendicott
04-25-2012, 07:19 PM
I plan on getting it.

nelie
04-25-2012, 09:06 PM
Yes, they have proven that HPV causes cervical cancer. When they came out with the vaccine, I had my daughter get it, but we discussed it first and she agreed.

It's such a shame that the DPT vaccine damaged so many young ones. I have a neighbor who remembers to the moment when her son seized shortly after receiving this vaccine. He became autistic after that.

Autism isn't caused by vaccinations. That was debunked many years ago, including the scientist who started it saying that he fabricated his findings. It just do happens that autism tends to appear around the same age that children gets diagnosed.

Also, the DTP vaccine has been reworked a few times since it came out in the 40s. I did a research paper on the P in DTP and that alone (whooping cough) is highly contagious and can cause many infant deaths, even with proper treatment and medical care. So it is a trade off to risk some of the rare, serious side effects of vaccines or be exposed to highly contagious things that can kill you or those you come into contact. With so many people jumping on the anti-vacc bandwagon, the herd protection is starting to deteriorate. Babies and young children are generally the most susceptible.

threenorns
04-25-2012, 09:42 PM
Autism isn't caused by vaccinations. That was debunked many years ago, including the scientist who started it saying that he fabricated his findings. It just do happens that autism tends to appear around the same age that children gets diagnosed.

Also, the DTP vaccine has been reworked a few times since it came out in the 40s. I did a research paper on the P in DTP and that alone (whooping cough) is highly contagious and can cause many infant deaths, even with proper treatment and medical care. So it is a trade off to risk some of the rare, serious side effects of vaccines or be exposed to highly contagious things that can kill you or those you come into contact. With so many people jumping on the anti-vacc bandwagon, the herd protection is starting to deteriorate. Babies and young children are generally the most susceptible.


first off: the doctor who detected the link and was subsequently excoriated by the British Medical Journal has been vindicated - he was found to be the subject of a witch hunt by a journalist, name of Deer, who was commissioned by the British medical association specifically to discredit Dr Wakefield.

article here: http://www.politicolnews.com/new-2011-autism-studies-links-to-mmr-vaccines/

New American Studies today in February 2011 conducted by a team of doctors at Wake Forest University School in the state of North Carolina studied and tested over 275 children a much larger study than Dr. Wakefield.

The discovery of the Forest University backs up Dr. Wakefield’s reports of a bowel disease where out of 82 of the children 70 of them tested positive for the measles virus.

A spokesman Dr. Stephen Walker states that from the results all of the research points to a vaccine strain of the virus (that which is injected into children) not another typical strain of measles found naturally from child to child type introductions.

The research these doctors undertook, proves that in the intestines of children or the gastro-intestinal tracts of those who have been diagnosed with autism the children were found to have the measles viruses from the vaccine they were given in their gut.



Read more: http://www.politicolnews.com/new-2011-autism-studies-links-to-mmr-vaccines/#ixzz1t6P4AxiW


secondly, more and more doctors are questioning the validity of vaccinating infants, given that it's a known fact that they don't actually HAVE a functioning immune system until about 1yr of age. this is one of the reasons why breastfeeding is of such critical importance: their immunity comes from the antibodies tailored to the baby by the mother's body.

fun fact: if the baby is exposed to a pathogen, the mother's body will generate antibodies even if she, herself, has not been exposed (let's say the baby is at day care all day). the pathogen is excreted in the baby's saliva, which is detected by glands in the aureola, which in turn triggers the mother's immune system to create antibodies.

another fun fact: if a baby needs a heart transplant, they try like anything to get it done before the age of one year. reason is, if the heart transplant is done before the immune system kicks online, the baby will never need anti-rejection drugs ****and the heart doesn't need to be a tissue match***. when the immune system kicks online, the baby's immune system will register the mismatched heart as belonging to the body - wrong tissue type and all.

as for whooping cough, you might want to read these numbers:

In a recent British outbreak of whooping cough, for example, even fully vaccinated children contracted the disease in substantial numbers, and the rate of serious or fatal complications was reduced only slightly. [note 5] In another pertussis outbreak, 46 of the 85 fully vaccinated kids studied eventually came down with the disease. [note 6] In 1977, 34 cases of measles were reported on the campus of UCLA in a student population that was 91% “immune,” according to careful serological testing. [note 7] In Pecos, New Mexico, during a period of a few months in 1981, 15 out of 20 reported cases of measles had been vaccinated, some of them quite recently. [note 8] A recent survey of sixth-graders in a fully-vaccinated urban community demonstrated that about 15% of this age group are still susceptible to rubella, a figure essentially identical with that of the pre-vaccine era. [note 9] Finallly, although the yearly incidence of measles in the U. S. has fallen sharply from about 400,000 cases in the early 1960′s to about 30,000 cases by 1974-76, the death rate remained exactly the same; [note 10] and, with the peak incidence now in adolescents and young adults, the risk of pneumonia and liver enzyme abnormalities has risen to 3% and 20%, respectively. [note 11]

from http://vran.org/about-vaccines/general-issues/doctors-speak/the-case-against-immunizatons/


i cannot prove her massive reaction to vaccination caused my oldest daughter's asperger's syndrome - but nobody can prove it didn't, either, and i prefer to err on the side of caution which is why my daughter doesn't get vaccinated any more. even my dog is allergic to vaccination - on his second shot, he ended up with a bald spot around the injection site with the skin all pink and crispy looking !

do i care if my daughter gets sick with one of those diseases? i'll take the statistically *****miniscule**** chance that she will suffer lifelong consquences or even death over the, in my experience, near certainty that she will have an adverse vaccine reaction any day.

nelie
04-25-2012, 10:48 PM
This is actually a pretty good article talking about the review of studies that have tried to link autism and vaccination:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/26/health/26vaccine.html

As for Whooping Cough, the primary cause of it in infants is adults and other children in the same household. So its not necessarily that the baby has to be vaccinated but it is recommended that other household members are vaccinated. It is part of the herd mentality where when most of the population is vaccinated, then you get a decent amount of protection to those that are unvaccinated.

FYI - that article was published in the early 80s. The Pertussis vaccine has been updated a couple times since then as well as the immunization schedule. From when I did my research, the Pertussis vaccine is highly effective when the vaccination schedule is followed (it varies by age/previous vaccinations) and although you still can get whooping cough, it is generally shorter and less severe.

(And I know we have gotten off topic but my main point was that there have been some issues with vaccines in the past, they do get updated based on current research and it is good to know that not everything is cut and dry regarding dangers of vaccines)

threenorns
04-25-2012, 11:57 PM
the problem is, they still cannot prove that vaccination works. there is no way to prove it - the huge die-off of measles and smallpox that is attributed to vaccination cannot be verified: it was already on its way out when vaccination was introduced and after public sewage and water treatment was begun and rates have not improved in developing countries except in places where sanitation has improved. 93%+ of australians get the flu vaccine, yet the death rate is unchanged from before it was invented. how is it working? apparently not very well. the chicken pox vaccine - designed to save the 2 or 3 kids that die in *north america* each year from chicken pox - has created a nightmare of a shingles outbreak. shingles used to be a disease of old people, yet now young children are getting it.

as for improving vaccines - how? have you read the list of ingredients in this stuff?

from http://www.novaccine.com/vaccine-ingredients/

okay, let's look at the ingredients for the HPV vaccine:

In the News: GARDASIL VACCINE NOT PROVEN SAFE
"Merck and the FDA have not been completely honest with the people about the pre-licensure clinical trials," said NVIC president Barbara Loe Fisher. "Merck's pre and post-licensure marketing strategy has positioned mass use of this vaccine by pre-teens as a morality play in order to avoid talking about the flawed science they used to get it licensed. This is not just about teenagers having sex, it is also about whether Gardasil has been proven safe and effective for little girls."

Recommendations 3 intramuscular injections at 0, 2, 6 months -- as young as 9 years old to 26 years old
Ingredients Polysorbate 80, Sodium chloride, Sodium Borate, L-histidine hydrochloride, Aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate, Virus: Human papillomavirus (denatured) (HPV).

an interesting paper on the inter-reaction of polysorbate-80 and L-Histidine (Gardasil is the first vaccine to use Histidine): http://www.renewamerica.com/columns/janak/080830

sodium borate: trade name is borax. it's acidic, used to kill cockroaches by eating through their carapace. that's something i want injected into my daughter's veins.

sodium chloride: table salt (just to make it feel better)

aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulphate: a newborn who gets a Hepatitis B injection on day one of life would receive 250 mcg of aluminum. This would be repeated at one month with the next Hep B shot. When, at two months, a baby gets its first big round of shots, the total dose of aluminum could vary from 295 mcg to a whopping 1225 mcg . These doses are repeated at four and six months. With most subsequent rounds of shots, a child would continue to get some aluminum throughout the first two years. But the FDA recommends that premature babies, and anyone with impaired kidney function, receive no more than 10 to 25 mcg of injected aluminum at any one time."

and now they want to add gardasil to the mix!



i don't care what they say: i'm trusting a healthy diet and my daughter's own immune system to do the job nature designed - and that wasn't to fight off 3 to 6 illnesses directly injected into her bloodstream all at the same time.

Jez
04-26-2012, 12:21 AM
I would not vaccinate.
I had HPV from 20 to 22. I had some cryos/colposcopies. It ran its course and disappeared right at the end of the usual 9 months to 2 year mark. I'm 30 now, and haven't had an abnormal pap since.

nelie
04-26-2012, 12:30 AM
And obviously we are having a discussion because people have different views about vaccines. I personally think that the benefits of vaccines outweigh the risks which is why I get vaccinated and continue to get vaccinated.

Alwaysbeenbig
04-26-2012, 02:10 AM
I received the HPV vaccine when I was in my final years of high school, and I have been vaccinated according to government health guidelines (Australia) for my entire life. These guidelines are fairly strict in regards to the amount of time that must be left between vaccine doses, the age and weight of the child being vaccinated and also takes into account the mothers vaccination history. (particularly when dealing with infants,e.g. I was refused a rebella vaccine untill I was 16 because of my mothers history, when I got it no harm).

Yes, I am pro vaccination. I don't subscribe to the "vaccinations cause autism". I do agree with parents and guardians being informed of the risks associated with vaccines. If I ever have children then I intend to have them vaccinated.

I don't want to be in a position where children or adults are dieing from diseases that can be prevented.

My last point will probably annoy some of you:
I have a problem with parents that refuse to vaccinate (by choice), their child contracts a preventable disease and then passes that disease on to a baby (who is too young to be vaccinated) who later dies. Your actions have consequences, not only in your own lives, but also in other peoples. I couldn't ever live with the guilt that my choice had caused another family to lose a baby.If you choose not to vaccinate your child, I believe that you need to take responsibility for your decision and you may need to segregate that child from particularly vulnerable members of the community.i.e. the very old and the very young.

4star
04-26-2012, 08:13 AM
I think what's most important with decisions like vaccinate/don't vaccinate is the risk/benefit analysis that a person does after they have been fully informed.

Vaccines can be very useful but also can cause some serious side effects. A lot of times people get vaccinated and do fine but some people have met serious injury and death from being vaccinated also. It's important to know and weigh those risks.

Please remember to make your own decision based on good medical information and your Doc's opinion, not b/c someone on the internets said it would all be fine and dandy.

sumire
04-26-2012, 09:12 AM
Walking outside can be very relaxing but also can cause some serious side effects. A lot of times people just walk around and do fine but some people have been struck by lightning and met serious injury or death. It's important to know and weigh those risks.

(I mean that with all good humor, I promise. :) But yes, I'm strongly pro-vacc.)

Beach Patrol
04-26-2012, 11:54 AM
I'm strongly anti-vaccine. I believe in keeping the body clean - as clean as possible - for as long as possible. And I believe it is harder & harder to do these days, with the many ways they "preserve" so many of our foods, and so many additives, and yaddayaddayadda.

I don't like the idea of putting "chemicals" into my body unnecessarily. Yes, of course I have had vaccines in the past; as a child of the 60's, I had to get all those shots before entering school, etc. And I had the flu vaccine ONCE about 15 years ago... it made me SO SICK! - sicker than any flu bug I've ever had!! - & I swore I'd never get it again.

The fact is nobody knows WHAT causes any type of cancer. You can say smoking causes lung cancer - but does it? What of those people who never smoked a day in their life? What of those people who smoked all their life & NEVER got cancer? What about women who get breast cancer who have shown no cancer in their family line? Or those who don't get it even tho their mothers, grandmothers, siblings, etc might have that "gene"?? I think a lot of cancers are caused by many different factors; not just one or two. Maybe those who smoke like a chimney (my mother) & don't get lung cancer is because they ALWAYS ate a small onion with their dinner, and drank buttermilk before bedtime and happened to have AB+ blood type, & was raised on a farm as opposed to a city-raised person who never ate onions or drank buttermilk & was O- blood type... I mean who knows, ya know? They can speculate about what causes certain diseases & so forth, or what PREVENTS certain ones, etc, but until they can PROVE that something "CAUSES" the cancer, then I'm not buying into the "medicated" prevention.

ICUwishing
04-26-2012, 01:28 PM
Ditto Beach Patrol, here. In addition, I simply have lost faith that the FDA is actually looking out for our best interests, given how riddled with lobbyists they are, and how the studies that conveniently prove all this stuff is safe are funded by the corporations standing to make the most money. The harder they push everybody to get all these wonderful shots, the more you have to look at who's making the profit off it.

krampus
04-26-2012, 01:59 PM
I got the HPV vaccine when I was in college. I've slept around (one at a time, but still, you know) and made less than brilliant decisions. My outlook on this specific vaccine is "why not, it takes 5 minutes and could help prevent cancer maybe."

I choose to leave most other things untreated, though - I rarely take medicine of any kind of anything other than UTIs or motion sickness.

mandalinn82
04-27-2012, 06:54 PM
As a reminder, posts with facts about vaccination in general are fine. Posts which contain personal attacks or show disrespect toward other opinions, even if you strongly disagree with those opinions, violate 3FC's "Agree to Disagree" policy.

GlamourGirl827
04-28-2012, 04:47 PM
Walking outside can be very relaxing but also can cause some serious side effects. A lot of times people just walk around and do fine but some people have been struck by lightning and met serious injury or death. It's important to know and weigh those risks.

(I mean that with all good humor, I promise. :) But yes, I'm strongly pro-vacc.)

^This^ :cp:

Also there is not a doubt in my mind that my son's autism is not from his vaccine's. Not to mention I have another child, that followed the full vaccination schedule in the same manor and is neurotypical. I've known parents who's child had some subtle sign of autism, but the parents over looked the earlier signs, then around the time that it becomes more evident, they start looking for something to blame, when in reality the signs were there all along. But its human nature to want a reason, to want to say "yes it was this that caused it". Honestly, the easiest way to debunk the vaccine thing is find a family that with held vaccines for their children and still had a child develope autism...

Please refer to signature for typos and spelling errors...

GlamourGirl827
04-28-2012, 05:34 PM
The fact is nobody knows WHAT causes any type of cancer. You can say smoking causes lung cancer - but does it? ....... They can speculate about what causes certain diseases & so forth, or what PREVENTS certain ones, etc, but until they can PROVE that something "CAUSES" the cancer, then I'm not buying into the "medicated" prevention.

Although this would never happen, I think in cases like yours, should you become ill and it is resonable for a healthcare provider to conclude that your lack of "buying into" what is accepted evidence based medicine lead to that, then you should not be able to utilize the health care system for it, at all. I know that sounds harsh, but I don't think a person should be able to disreguard what is being taught, then come looking for help when it blows up in their face. But like I said, that will never happen and we will always be here to help patients that wouldn't listen to why we teach what we do, and now are sick because of it. I also think health insurance companies should not have to pay for health care for people that are sick because they knowingly ignored preventative medicine as well. Ah but that's a topic for a whole seperate thread.

threenorns
04-29-2012, 10:30 AM
smoking does not "cause" lung cancer - it increases the risk of getting it otherwise 100% of smokers would get lung cancer.

vaccination does not "prevent" anything - it "may" decrease the odds of catching it and it "may" reduce the severity if you do catch it. those aren't my words, that is the official wording.

"may"

as in, "maybe" "possibly" "theoretically"

that doesn't sound like "prevention" to me.

ICUwishing
04-29-2012, 10:41 AM
Perhaps ... Vaccinations are much like dieting? Clearly, the majority benefit from eat less/move more. But there are outliers, for whom a calorie is not a calorie, because of their genetic underpinnings, underlying conditions, or something else. I recently read a paper where the author suggested that BEFORE vaccinations are given, it would be worthwhile for someone with a history of autoimmune sensitivities, family history of bad reactions, or such, to consider a reduced schedule, partial schedule, or testing prior. I have no disagreement that a mass majority have no harm from vaccinations; my issue comes from those who have complicating conditions being FORCED into them.

junebug41
04-29-2012, 11:09 AM
I've never heard of someone being forced to immunize if they are allergic or have a compromised immune system. From my understanding, those are the people that depend on herd immunity and for whom it is intended.

sacha
04-29-2012, 12:34 PM
I feel blessed for having the choice (as I feel CHOICE is still a human right), as someone else has said, we are privileged enough to say that we don't want a vaccine whereas in other places, desperate mothers will wait hours when the traveling clinic takes years to attend their village.

What a first world problem we have.

mimsyborogoves
04-29-2012, 01:44 PM
I can understand why some people wouldn't want to have the HPV vaccination; it's really kind of pointless because it doesn't totally prevent you from getting HPV, and if you've already had sex, especially with someone that has had sex with other people besides you, then it's pretty much rendered useless.

However, other vaccines, yeah definitely. I think if your child has potential to have a bad reaction to the vaccine, then of course you would use caution, but I'd personally rather have a needle jabbed in my arm then get, say, tuberculosis or some other really serious, life-threatening disease. As for the link between vaccines and Autism, I've always heard that a lot of children are born with it and don't start showing signs until they're 2-3 years old, which is when they'd be in the process of getting vaccines, anyway. I don't see why something couldn't cause a child to develop Autism after birth, but I don't think vaccines cause Autism. I have three young relatives that are Autistic, and all three of them were born with it; just the signs didn't show up until later. I think because a lot of people want a reason for their or their child's disorder, they're willing to put blame on anything and everything that could make something go wrong with their child, but the reality is there's no way to know.

It's kinda like HPV, though. I didn't know I had it until I went to the doctor and they called and told me my abnormal pap showed signs of HPV and brought me in for a colposcopy. Yeah, my first reaction was to place blame on anything and everything that I've ever come into contact with -- but you can't really do that cause there's no real way to know.

I think the important thing to do is keep healthy and make responsible decisions and do whatever you think is right for you and your family, but if someone comes up with something that's unexplainable, instead of spending time trying to figure out what caused it, spend your time making life livable for you and your family by having healthy behaviors and lifestyles. Some things are unpreventable and we can't really do anything about them, so we just have to deal and make the best of whatever life throws at us.

And that's it for my two cents, and I hope no one gets offended or anything by what I said -- no offense was meant.

cherrypie
04-29-2012, 03:04 PM
If I had daughters they would be immunized

sumire
04-29-2012, 07:02 PM
vaccination does not "prevent" anything - it "may" decrease the odds of catching it and it "may" reduce the severity if you do catch it. those aren't my words, that is the official wording.

"may"

as in, "maybe" "possibly" "theoretically"

that doesn't sound like "prevention" to me.

Exercise "may" prevent heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, etc. No guarantees. Should we all just say "screw it" to exercise?

elleohelle
04-29-2012, 09:52 PM
i agree with you sumire!