Weight Loss Support - First 10+ pounds gone. What to do about Christmas?




dstalksalot
12-21-2011, 01:49 PM
So I have been running since Oct. and calorie counting for about 3 weeks and just hit my first 10 pounds lost. I am not sure how to approach eating for Christmas. I don't want to fall off the wagon, but I want to enjoy some extra goodies like chocolate in my stocking and make some Christmas cookies with the kids.

I am using the loose it app and started at almost 1800 cals. I am now at about 1600 and wondering how high I can go without gaining for a couple of days.

I have been pondering not tracking because I want to eventually get to intuitive eating but I fear going overboard. I am not sure what I will do if I am not tracking because I have not let my self yet.

I have been visualizing those white powdered sugar dome cookies and am starting to FEAR Christmas. I just want to be normal relax and enjoy my day. Why is this even an issue?!


sontaikle
12-21-2011, 01:53 PM
You can work the Christmas treats into your current calorie count or you can find out your maintenance level and aim to maintain over the holidays rather than lose. A lot of people go the second route so that they can enjoy themselves a little bit during the holidays :)

Over Thanksgiving I actually didn't calorie count at all and did some intuitive eating. It worked and I managed to stay on track with my weight loss goals. However, I was at the whole weight loss thing for ~6 month at that point and had gotten used to smaller portions (and therefore got full faster). I didn't eat a lot at Thanksgiving because I simply couldn't.

If you feel you can trust your intuitive eating radar, go for it. If you're worried you might go overboard you can track at 1600 calories or maintenance calories.

NEMom
12-21-2011, 01:56 PM
I think the secret to success is not going overboard on the treats. This is something I have a very hard time with, I am having a hard time eating just one or two and leaving it at that.
Try planning ahead what treats and how many you are going to allow yourself. After your celebrations are done, hop right back on the wagon and maybe even consider lowering your calories a bit for the next week after Christmas to offset the 'cheat'.


dstalksalot
12-21-2011, 02:46 PM
If I am currently at a cal deficit to loose 1.5 pounds a week, so I would assume that I can safely add 750 cals for each day that I want to just maintain correct? I am thinking around 2300 ???
I hate math.

lin43
12-21-2011, 03:02 PM
If I am currently at a cal deficit to loose 1.5 pounds a week, so I would assume that I can safely add 750 cals for each day that I want to just maintain correct? I am thinking around 2300 ???
I hate math.

Logically, that makes sense, but for some reason, in "real life" the numbers often do not work out that neatly. To be on the safe side, maybe you can aim for 2000 calories. Also, you might consider calorie cycling, which is aiming for a lower calorie count on some days and "banking" those calories for days you anticipate needing them. I agree with the other two posters that it's a good idea to just maintain during the holidays and get strict the week after. I would also add that if it were me, I would wait until I was back on losing calories for a week before I weighed in.

canadianwoman
12-21-2011, 03:03 PM
I think the secret to success is not going overboard on the treats. This is something I have a very hard time with, I am having a hard time eating just one or two and leaving it at that.
Try planning ahead what treats and how many you are going to allow yourself. After your celebrations are done, hop right back on the wagon and maybe even consider lowering your calories a bit for the next week after Christmas to offset the 'cheat'.

I think we are all having a hard time just having one or two treats. I know that I certainly am. It is difficult but it can be done if one is determined enough.

Mimzzy
12-21-2011, 03:32 PM
Honestly, my plan is to try and fill up on veggies and salad before going for all the goodies in an attempt to stop myself from over indulging. However, If I do go over in a calories and totally blow the day then so be it. This is a lifestyle change for me and there are going to be days in life that are not completely calorie controlled and perfect, I still want to enjoy myself on occasion. The key is on occasion, I must also learn how to rein myself back in the very next day and not let a day turn into a week, month or year. I figure this will be great practice, so far I have managed to get back on track the very next day after every indiscretion but more practice never hurt anyone :D

baker23
12-21-2011, 03:49 PM
"I just want to be normal relax and enjoy my day"

Then I think you should. Calorie counting is preparing you for a lifestyle change. I think you'll find that you'll already be able to eat less in comparision to past years just because thats what your body is used to. Don't be to worried or overanalize it :) You deserve to have a day just to eat, you know...

My plan is on christmas eve and christmas to bacially eat anything I want. I tend to get fuller with small amounts especially since I nibble throughout the day anyways. Eating alot at one time just isn't possible for me. No counting calories...Just eating when I'm hungry, not eating when i'm not. After christmas its right back on plan with no guilt because honestly, i'll feel like i'm not having fun if I count every morsel that goes into my mouth. If you think you'll be ok not tracking, and not have any regret after, then I say go for it. But if you still feel like your not comfortable eyeballing everything that day, then up to maintaince or stay at your losing calorie count. Its only your choice

carter
12-21-2011, 04:31 PM
If thinking about avoiding treats on Christmas day itself is stressing you out, then there is no harm in having a few treats.

The danger is not in having a few treats on Christmas day itself - the danger lies in letting go of your plan the rest of the time. Go ahead and eat the treat that you fear is going to haunt you - but don't let that become a week-long (or longer!) lapse in the plan you've set up for yourself. Eating a treat on Christmas doesn't have to mean you've "blown it". As long as you eat on plan the rest of the time, a treat here and there is not going to sink you in the grand scheme of things.

Having said that, one tactic I use frequently and to good effect is, "not now." When I go to an office party, for example, and the treats are spread out before me, I tell myself "not now - go circulate around the room, talk to people, and maybe have a treat in a little while." The next time I find myself attracted to the treats, I tell myself the same thing. If I eat one at all, it won't be until the very end of the party, when I'm leaving. That helps me limit myself to just one, instead of getting the taste in my mouth early in the party and having to fight the urge for more the rest of the way.

Renwomin
12-21-2011, 05:18 PM
I've continued to lose weight over a holiday season before and it is completely doable without sacrificing all treats. I've found the below things helped:

Limiting the amount of sweets / treats in my own home
No mindless snacking at holiday gatherings
Holiday meals - controlling portions of high calorie items
Only eating when hungry - Not going back for seconds

On the days of holiday meal gatherings I would eat more calories than I normally would when watching carefully, but I wasn't eating nearly as much as I would have when I was being less healthy. That to me is a step in the right direction. Since I normally had one splurge meal a week anyway, it didn't stop my progress but perhaps slowed it slightly depending on my choices. The way I see it I need to make choices now I can live with for the rest of my life and finds ways to adapt. Not partaking at all of special treats during the holiday season isn't something I can sustain for the rest of my days. But you know yourself better than anyone. What is doable for you?

dstalksalot
12-21-2011, 05:21 PM
Thanks you guys. You all have some very good insight.

I guess I am just afraid of my self and fretting over something I have the power to control. I have the education now and I can be successful. It is all good practise for real life.