Exercise! - To those of you who run/jog.




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Rainy
11-09-2011, 03:10 PM
I'm looking for some advice from those of you who like to run.
I was running(jogging) a few months back and would go regularly (For at least one hour, five days a week). I did that for about three months and I found that I wasn't ever increasing the time I would run(jog) in, and I could only ever do the same amount. (about four miles).

I want to increase my stamina so that I can run/jog a constant mile, and I want to be able to do that in under 8 minutes.

So I guess what I'm after are things that will help me increase my physical, and possibly mental, stamina and duration when running/jogging.

Along with that.. Since I haven't gone in about four months, how would you suggest I get started again? How far/long should I try and go, how quickly I start, etc.

Any other tips, advice, support is also very welcomed and appreciated.


ValRock
11-09-2011, 03:16 PM
I jog a mile every morning. I got my time under 9 minutes once and I was pepped up on massive amounts of caffeine and it was an anger run. Anyway... 8 minutes is pretty ambitious!

Start by jogging as far as you can and then walking until you recover. Keep up the pattern, increasing the time you're running vs walking until you're running a solid mile. It took me about 2 months to get there.

Are you jogging outdoors or on the treadmill? I use a treadmill and started (about 6 months ago) with my walking stints at 4mph and jogging at 6mph. Now I start at 6mph with some sprints at 7.5mph thrown in.

Good luck!! Throw some strength training in there, too ;).

GlamourGirl827
11-09-2011, 03:28 PM
First let me say :bravo: for running!!! I love running!! I've been at it about a year and I still do about a 10:30 mile.
You can easily google tons of info on running, so really most of what I'm telling you I read elsewhere.
Seems speed workouts are a way to improve time. Which is like intervals. Run/jog/run. Well, warm up slow, then run at a pace you can only hold for like 1-2 minutes, then jog slower again for a few minutes, and repeat. That is a very watered down version. If you google it you can find very specific interval workouts.
Now I have read on running forums that beginners, or people such as myself that were not active befor running and started out overweight, should just work on basic easy runs until its a regular part of their life. The longest I've gone without running is about 2 weeks, though that's not usual. Today, for example though is about a week that I haven't run. Then I'll run consistently for a few months (3-4x week) then miss a week. I was told by a certified trainer that is a runner, that you have about 2 weeks off before you'll see a decrease in your running when you do get back. I must say I see it after a week!

Are you running the whole hour? Or do you have to walk? If you are walking, the advice given to me was slow down a bit, and consentrate more on going further without walking, rather than faster. THe advice worked for me. Last year at this time I could barely run for a few minutes without walking. Now I can run easily an hour without walking. I never would have thought it was possible!

Also tempo runs are good for increasing speed, but google those as I will likely explain that wrong!
I would just work on making all your runs enjoyable so you want to do them and running becomes a regular part of your life. 4 months is a long time to miss and you will likely be back at square one after that. But just keep at it! Its soo much fun and worth it!!
Good Luck!!


Rainy
11-09-2011, 03:29 PM
I really appreciate the response!

I know it's ambitious but it means I'll have to work harder to get to it, which motivates me.

I prefer the track outdoors, but I live in Northern Utah, so it's already freezing outside which means either the indoor track or a treadmill. For some reason I have a harder time on the treadmill, and I have no idea why.

I'll definitely throw in some strength training. I can't do full on real push ups yet, and definitely can't do a pull up and I'd love to be able to do both of those.


Thanks Glamour! That is some really sound advice.

For my hour I had a routine.. I'd walk the rounded parts of the track, or have a slower pace, and I'd jog at a higher pace on the straighter part of the track. I'd try to push myself every now and again by full on running/sprinting and see how far I could go before I felt like my lungs were going to burst.

I'll definitely be reading up on more beginner boards for sure, but I wanted to see what others here have done that helped them. I only have a few more months until I leave for 18 months to serve a mission, and I'd really like to be much closer to my weight goal by then and to me.. running is the best way to do it.

I've also been wanting to be better at it since I was in seventh grade when we had to run the mile, and I could never finish it in under 10 minutes.

josiesmom2011
11-09-2011, 03:31 PM
people have suggested the Couch to 5K.... i like you was running pretty seriously prior to finding out i was pregnant... my daughter is now 11 weeks old. Well when i was pregnant the running stopped, so i am now starting back at ground zero...... so i started the Couch to 5K to get back at it.... it might be too easy for you but its an option to help get back at it..... not sure how much help I am...lol..... let me know what works for you though, i always like hearing what helps people in situations similar to mine!!!

cammieb
11-09-2011, 03:37 PM
I would start off slow, maybe alternate running and jogging. When I first started, I would jog for 1.5 to 2 minutes and then walk for the same amount of time. Then I would repeat the cycle. Every week I would lengthen the amount of time I spent jogging and shorten the amount of time I spent walking until eventually I was jogging continuously.

As far as increasing speed and endurance, I've found that increasing intensity works. When I was planning on joining Navy special ops, my recruiter had me run stairs, hills and inclines. He also had me doing sprint intervals. It helped me go from a 9 minute mile to a 6:30 minute mile. Once you've been slaughtered on stair runs, running on level ground seems a lot easier.

Rainy
11-09-2011, 03:39 PM
@Jossie: That sounds like a great idea! Do you happen to have a link for more info on that?

@Cammieb: I hadn't thought of running with a treadmill incline, so that's a great idea for me. What kind of interval times were you doing, and what were you switching back and forth from?

Stair runs are also a really good idea, but that's going to kill me.

josiesmom2011
11-09-2011, 03:44 PM
yup, i googled Couch to 5K and it pulled up.... if you have an IPHONE there is an awesome APP for it..... its 2.99 but the best 2.99 ive spent.... its the FELT TIP INC APP CALLED COUCH TO 5k...... its great, it promts you to when to walk and when to run and it keeps track off all your work outs and after you've completed a week, it takes you to the next week workouts and its just awesome....

josiesmom2011
11-09-2011, 03:46 PM
That same app also makes a couch to 10K if you want that, but i thought i should take baby steps.

crainjo
11-09-2011, 03:47 PM
I definitly have a harder time on the treadmill. I have increase my times by putting in consistent miles, at least 12 per week. Some days I only run a mile or two, but try to run them faster than my normal pace. Then on other days I runs more miles at a slower pace. I also change my tracks up. I have a quarter mile track close to my house that is flat that I run sometimes, but most of my runs come at a hilly 1 mile walking track not far from my work.

My first 5k in April, I finished at almost a 10 minute mile pace, with lots of walking. My last 5k I finished with a 8:14 (25:30) pace with no walking and almost got sick I pushed so hard. I really want to get into the 21 to 22 minute 5k time eventually. But now I am focused on running farther, as I am running a half marathon in January.

Rainy
11-09-2011, 03:47 PM
@Josie: Oh gosh, that sounds perfect. I don't have an iphone, but I have an ipod touch so it'll work all the same. I'm going to get it as soon as I head home C:

@crainjo: Wow, that's inspiring! Yeah, I really am not a fan of the treadmills. My hips start to hurt when I'm on them for some reason? My feet tend to hurt more on them too, don't know why. I'm definitely going to have to start sooner now. I want to be making progress already! I'm all pumped up ha ha.

josiesmom2011
11-09-2011, 03:51 PM
it is the b est app i've tried, and ive tried a lot of them!! keep me updated to how you like it... once i get the 5 k mastered... again..lol... im going to work on the 10K

Rainy
11-09-2011, 03:58 PM
Sounds fantastic. I'll definitely keep you updated.

Unna
11-09-2011, 04:20 PM
I've been regularly jogging for a few years now. So, I'm just going to say this, without being nice. It is obviously just a suggestion - but is based on my own experiences:

If you try to jog faster and longer (at the same time), you will get injured and then you won't be running at all.

What is your hurry? Give your body time to adapt to running. I've done an 8 min. mile only a few times and I am 40lbs lighter than you. I think I normally average 10 - 11 min. Extra weight really matters with running - I feel a major difference with each pound gone. After you start to become smaller because of the running, you can then start to work on your speed.

Running is an awesome way to burn the calories - when I first started, I made it my goal to run to 3 songs in a row, then 4, etc. Keep it fun.

I would suggest holding off on the "speed" until your body get used to it. Instead I would focus on endurance - slow and steady. This will allow you to strengthen the heart muscle and increase your lung capacity.

Have fun!

MariaMaria
11-09-2011, 04:23 PM
If you try to jog faster and longer (at the same time), you will get injured and then you won't be running at all.

What is your hurry? Give your body time to adapt to running.

I would suggest holding off on the "speed" until your body get used to it. Instead I would focus on endurance - slow and steady.


yes yes yes

Rainy
11-09-2011, 04:35 PM
Because I was running before I obviously know that doing it all at once isn't safe, and can be damaging to the body. I was after tips on how others build endurance. I don't expect to be able to run what I want next week, and I don't expect the speed to come at the same time as the distance.

I do realize that you were just saying what works for you, but assuming that I'm in a hurry and can't do what I want, with the added remark of being 40lbs lighter is a slap to the face to anyone who is in the same position as I am.

I'm not just going to hop up off my couch and book it down the street. I'm also not completely immobile. My enthusiasm was towards starting back up, not pushing to make my goal in the quickest time possible.

jayohwhy
11-09-2011, 05:09 PM
Because I was running before I obviously know that doing it all at once isn't safe, and can be damaging to the body. I was after tips on how others build endurance. I don't expect to be able to run what I want next week, and I don't expect the speed to come at the same time as the distance.

I do realize that you were just saying what works for you, but assuming that I'm in a hurry and can't do what I want, with the added remark of being 40lbs lighter is a slap to the face to anyone who is in the same position as I am.

I'm not just going to hop up off my couch and book it down the street. I'm also not completely immobile. My enthusiasm was towards starting back up, not pushing to make my goal in the quickest time possible.

Yes, we understood that you ran before, but Unna was coming from being an experienced runner who has been running for awhile. Its horrible to get into the habit and end up being laid up with an injury. I accept that carrying more weight makes it harder to run faster and i think that when i weight 120 lbs, i will be able to more easily run faster than i do now at 160.

Others were trying to warn you that you should look at quality of runs instead of speed. an 8 minute mile is tough. but i think that if you only run 1 mile at a time instead of moderately sized runs of 3-4 miles or long rungs of 8-10 miles, then you will definitely get there, but at a smaller calorie burn versus long, slow and steady runs.

Rainy
11-09-2011, 05:22 PM
That may be the case, but there are better ways of approaching it than that. I didn't need the added on facts that I'm heavier, and that I'm trying to jump in head first when I'm not. It ruins a persons day.

slytherinanachronism
11-09-2011, 05:36 PM
I definitely agree with what some others have said: that you shouldn't focus on endurance and speed at the same time. If you're always running the same amount of miles at the same speed, either focus on improving your speed or running longer distances. I'd recommend endurance. Just try to run a little further every time. So if you're doing 4 miles for every run, next time just push yourself a little further. Try for 4.1 or 4.2 miles, and don't worry about your speed. You'll be running longer distances in no time. Or if you'd rather focus on speed, try running a mile at a time, so you can work on improving your time. If your usual is an 8 minute mile, try to do it in 7:50, then next time 7:40, and so on. Just my two cents, hope it helped.

cammieb
11-09-2011, 05:39 PM
@Jossie: That sounds like a great idea! Do you happen to have a link for more info on that?

@Cammieb: I hadn't thought of running with a treadmill incline, so that's a great idea for me. What kind of interval times were you doing, and what were you switching back and forth from?

Stair runs are also a really good idea, but that's going to kill me.

For the treadmill incline intervals, I started off with a 5 minute warm-up at 0. Then I would run at an incline of 5 for 1 minute and then run at level ground for 2 minutes, and repeat. I started with 5 sets and worked my way up until I could do 10 sets. Once I could do 10 sets, I started increasing the incline.

Stairs are killer. I used to live on the 25 story when I lived in Hawaii, so I would run up and down five stories and then walk up and down the same flights. When I first started, I could do it for like 10 minutes. I got to the point where I could do it for about 30 minutes, but it never really seemed easier. lol.

I disagree with the notion that you can't work on speed and endurance at the same time. If you learn to run faster, you'll naturally increase endurance. For example, If you run an 8 minute mile and learn to run a 7 minute mile, you'll probably be able to run longer at an 8 minute mile pace than you could before. Works the same with stamina. If you learn to run longer, it'll be easier for you run shorter runs at a faster pace.

When I was doing military training, I'd do a run for speed one day and then a run for endurance the next, along with the other things like incline, sprint. I was taught that is more well-balanced training and gets your body used to all kinds of things. Of course, you shouldn't overdo it, but you can easily overdo it even if you're just focusing on one thing at a time. To me, proper technique, the right shoes, plenty of rest and listening to your body are more important than which aspects of running you focus on.

Kahokkuri
11-09-2011, 07:18 PM
I'd like to reiterate Couch to 5K (and Bridge to 10K). I was a "runner" in middle school–I participated in cross country but was by no means good or fast–but avoided running in all forms until earlier this year, when C25K got me started.

I currently run on a treadmill because it helps with some bad leg pain I was having running on pavement. This means I can set a pace and go. I did a brief stint of outdoor running but found that it decreased my pace by at least 30%. When I set the machine to 9.5kph (6:18/km), my option is to run that pace or stop; mentally, this has really helped me push past discomfort and increase my distance.

I haven't stayed on the 3x/week schedule, so I'm getting through the program very slowly but I definitely recommend it for first-time runners and returners.

ValRock
11-09-2011, 08:47 PM
Kahokkuri!

How is Japan? I miss home.

継続は力なり。

ennay
11-09-2011, 08:54 PM
I'm going to pipe in and say

Just run

For a little while, when you are getting back in to it. Just. Run. Some days you'll feel like running faster, some days you'll feel like running slower. Same with farther and shorter. Go with it. Dont try to force a pace or a distance or a time for awhile. Day to day can vary because of a million reasons and the best way to stay healthy is Just. Run.

When you are back running on a consistent basis for several weeks then you can train for something.

JohnP
11-09-2011, 09:25 PM
I just want to mention that trying to push yourself to hard, too fast is a really bad idea.

Couch to 5K is a good program.

Injury is very common amoungst runnes, even experienced ones.

Goodluck!

Unna
11-10-2011, 05:03 AM
I'm sorry - I really didn't mean to ruin your day! It wasn't meant as a slap in the face - just a fact. Speed really comes naturally as you start to get lighter.

For example, I started running with my boyfriend (who is maybe 155 lbs) when I was somewhere between 180 - 185. He was going slower than was natural and I was doing my best to keep up with his slow jog. But, if you think about it, with every step on the hard pavement I was carrying an extra 20-25lbs! This gets really difficult after 3 or 4 miles.

Now that I have slimmed up and am about his size (although, darn him, he is still thinner!), we both run naturally about the same speed - he's not slowing down for me anymore.

In regards to building endurance and speed, the marathon runners I know train for either speed or endurance on separate days - they don't tackle both the same day.

In the end, in the years I've been jogging, I've suffered many injuries that, quite frankly, could have been avoided if I would have gave myself time. It is SUPER frustrating, when you love running, to literally be forced to stop in order to heal. It can easily lead to depression.

Actually, now that I realize running becomes more enjoyable the thinner I am, I am really looking to running at 140-145. Speed and less injuries tend to naturally come with being thinner - that part was really not meant as a diss of any sort. At my highest weight ever, I was 230 lbs. There are absolutely no judgments here.

Best of luck! Running and controlling calories is amazing for dropping pounds and lifting moods. I'm sorry for writing anything - I guess we all need to make our own good and bad experiences when it comes to running, not be told by others what is good or bad. Its sort of like falling in love... :)

toastedsmoke
11-10-2011, 07:16 AM
I agree that it seems easier to run as you get lighter but thats neither here nor there in this case because you're going to discover that for yourself anyway as YOU get lighter AND you're already a runner doing 4 mile jogs, so it isn't weight holding you back from running.

I personally finished C25K in the late 220s (started in the 240s) and was "running" VERY slowlyly, I mean SO slowly in could have walked faster than I was running. Over time (and still weighing over 200 lbs), I was able to work on my speed (which ive raised over 2.5mph since i finished C25k and which im srill working on) which is what you want to accomplish.

I dont claim to be an expert but personally I think there are two approaches. You can either work on your endurance and try to start adding distance which in the long run in my experience will make shorter runs seem a little easier and enable you to run them faster, this is what I did first. OR you can do what I ended up doing (because even though I enjoy running, I do it for fitness and am not at heart a very long-distance runner, 5k is probably the limit of my attention span), and jettison distance for now to work on speed. Or you can do both, that's a 3rd option. Have speed work days and distance days.

What I did was that even though I could jog 5k (in like 45mins) when I first finished the C25K programme, I stopped doing 5km and started doing shorter runs with walking intervals. Basically I did C25K starting from week 5-6 ish to the end but increasing my pace each go around. Like the first time I repeated the C25K programme at 0.5 mph above my personal best pace. Then once I'd finished the programme again I added another 0.5mph and so on.

I think ultimately your running goals will determine your approach. You may decide its more useful for you to work on endurance than do speed work for now. Either way, don't feel like you can't achieve your goal. Just take it slow (not literally of course ;) )and listen to your body, you'll get there.

Rainy
11-10-2011, 03:57 PM
Thank you everyone for the responses.

It's okay Unna, I know you were just trying to be helpful. I'm just a little sore over the fact that I gained weight back that I've lost at least twice before, and I want to be back at what I was at.

I downloaded the app for the couch to 5k and gave it a try today and I really think that it's the perfect thing for me currently. I love that it tells me what to do and when.

I'm feeling really motivated, and I hope that I can get to where some of you others are at here in the next couple of months.

josiesmom2011
11-10-2011, 10:31 PM
YEA RAINY!!!!! so glad you liked that app!!! Im actually getting ready to head to gym here shortly... after dinner digests, and do day 3 of week 1!!!

wickedlady
11-12-2011, 11:21 AM
Just wanted to reiterate that when you work on endurance, the speed comes naturally. For example, when you are able to run 5 or 6 miles at a slower speed, you'll find that you can handle shorter distances a lot faster. Couch to 5k is great. Keep at it, and when you finish that, just listen to your body and keep adding on gradually. Good luck! :)