Carb Counters - Need help sticking to it.




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carblover46
11-06-2011, 12:09 PM
I just joined this forum and wrote a little about myself in the introduction thread under "need motivation".

I have tried many diets and cannot lose weight therefore the low carb is my a last ditch effort to see if it will work. This is the last diet I would choose as I love carbs but there are no other choices and I am determined to loose weight somehow.

I am combining diet and exercise but I need motivation which is why I am here. Only a dieter understands. I, for one, need to create a "mind set" to even begin a diet and succeed and I am ready now.

Can I post here when I am weakening and get suggestions form others who have experienced these feelings and got through them somehow ?

I have tried this diet before and start to go off at the 2 week point. Need help getting through that. Need to lose 60 lb.


Arkansas Kel
11-06-2011, 01:47 PM
We're here for you! You can only fail if you quit. I "fall off the wagon" way more than I should, but overall, I get results by resuming as soon as I can. Perfection is my nemesis. If I fall off, I have to remind myself, it's not over, it's just a "human" thing and humans are not perfect.

kaplods
11-06-2011, 02:02 PM
Welcome.

And as for your question - Absolutely!

The great thing about 3FC is that you can post and find posts on just about anything you could possibly need for weight loss.

I've been struggling with my weight since I was 5 (and I'm 45 now).

It's rather ironic that low-carb has turned out to be the only diet on which I can lose weight, without insane 24/7 hunger.

I did however have to redefine success to get this far. I also don't seem to be able to "stick to" any plan for more than a week or two - and in the past, I would believe (because there are a lot of people telling us this) that my "cheating" meant I was doomed to fail (or at least that I wasn't on the right plan for me).

I believed a lot of what I was taught about weight loss, but now I question everything, because in many ways, according to common weight loss wisdom, I am failing - but I've failed off 98 lbs, so this time's failure, has been better than all my previous successes.

If I had done better, I would have lost the weight faster - but that doesn't mean squat. The fact is that all the things that we've been taught "doom weight loss" don't - they just make the journey slower.

So, when you find yourself making mistakes, remember that the mistakes can slow you down, but they can only stop you if you let them.

I've learned that I don't just lose best, I also feel best on a low-carb diet, and yet I still let mysyelf get derailed by something yummy looking - far too frequently. I've made it this far just by being determined to get right back to what I know works (even if I keep falling off the horse, I keep getting right back on), as soon as possible.

There's a weird "diet tradition" that most of us follow without even questioning where we learned it. When we believe that we've broken our diet, or discovered that we don't like the plan we're on - we go on an eating spree, usually until we've gained all the weight back before going on to start another diet (either the same one we abandoned or a different one).

If we treated mountain climbing like this, as soon as we stumbled, we'd deliberately throw ourselves off the mountain to the bottom, so that we could "start fresh."

I've learned that I can eventually reach my goal, just by picking myself up after every mistake, and even if I make a mistake every day I can still end up moving in the direction I want to go, as long as I pick myself up as soon as I fall and don't let a mistake be an excuse to backslide.

With low-carb, the consequences of mistakes often look bigger than with other weight loss methods, and you need to know why, so that you don't panic when you see it happen.

Low-carb has the reputation that "going off" results in more extreme and rapid weight gain. There are several reasons, so if you're prepared, you can prevent most of the gain, and can control the rest.

One, the body needs more water to digest carbs, so when you first go onto low-carb, you'll probably see a very rapid drop in weight, that's thrilling - but is mostly water - the water you no longer need, because you're not eating many carbs. When you go off the low-carb diet, even for a day or two, you'll see a huge gain. It's just the water needed to digest the carbs you've eaten. If you return to low-cab, that water weight will come off again, rather quickly. It could take a week or even two if you happen to be around TOM when your body is retaining water for other reasons, but it will come back off.

Related to this is the idea that if you switch to a higher-calorie low-calorie plan, you're doomed to somehow gain ALL your weight back (untrue by the way). You will gain water weight for the reasons above, but you can still lose weight with other plans. It may be slower and more difficult, but it's doable.

Also worth mentioning, carbs do have an "addictive" property. If you read the book The End of Overeating, by David Kessler, he explains and illustrates this very well (especially carbs combined with salt and fat). Going back to carbs, can make you even hungrier for them - but if you're controlling your calorie intake and getting back to low-carb ASAP most of this gain isn't going to happen (just the water weight issues).



It's important to realize this, because if you eat something off plaln, even if the calorie count is relatively low, you could see a substantial gain on the scale and feel hopeless if you don't understand that in all liklihood, it's just temporary water weight that will disappear as soon as you're back on plan. (You haven't stored extra fat, just a little extra water).

If you decide that low-carb isn't for you, you just have to accept that you need that little bit of extra water, and not to worry about it, as you find another way to lose weight.

It also is not true that you can't do both low-carb and calorie counting or that you can't alternate low-carb with another plan. I do both, and it's worked fine, as long as I remember that my weight is going to naturally fluctuate more if I'm not on a stable carb-level. If I switch from my 1800 calorie low-carb plan to my 1800 calorie high-carb plan (which I do for situation in which low-carb is going to be difficullt, say for a family wedding or holiday meal) I'm going to see a temporary gain, but unless I exceed my calorie range it's not going to be a permament gain.


I didn't mean to write a book here. I tend to let my ideas run away with me.

Welcome, and good luck. Hang in there (and here) and you'll be fine.


carblover46
11-06-2011, 06:06 PM
Thanks Arkansas and Kaplod. I appreciate your responses and tips for success. I will keep all of them in mind during my weight loss journey. I already went out shopping to buy all the foods that I can have so I wont' be tempted by the ones I need to avoid.

Congratulations to both of you for your weight loss.

rho1640
11-07-2011, 06:20 PM
The beginning is harder because you need to get used to what to have what to substitute and to just get it out of your system too I think - after a bit it gets easier -

There is no failure unless you go off completely and never come back - it may take a little longer but younwill get there.

And posting is key I think - I know it has helped me immensely ... Maybe try joining a challenge - that also helps me a lot.

You can do it for sure and welcome!

Arkansas Kel
11-07-2011, 10:29 PM
Yah, I find posting keeps me in check. I even think about eating something sometimes, and then decide I don't want to "confess" all that later. Instead, I eat a little of it and then confess my will power at stopping after a couple bites. Saturday, however, was a big FAIL - yes, FAIL. But Sunday, I bounced right back. It's all good. It was just one day out of many, and I just could not reign myself in. I gained 1.2 lbs total (and now I understand that's water weight - so000 lookin forward to a late week weigh in to see where I really am).

Heck, sometimes I post just to keep from eating. sometimes I post so much I end up posting to myself!

Isn't shopping fun for low carb. I have the most yummy, luxurious, decadent cart. And that's just my cheese, heavy cream and bacon! I love buying all the "fatty" foods and knowing they are the right choices for me. Also, I like checking out the other carts (c'mon, we all do it) and the person with the cart. I feel pity for the chunky chicks with carts full of overprocessed, over sweetened flour filled fluffy nothing to fill you up foods, and I feel sorry for the chunky chicks with carts loaded with low fat plain foods. My cart is full of fat, flavor, and filling foods that I enjoy later and feel satisfied with most days. Beat that!

carblover46
11-08-2011, 11:43 AM
Thanks everyone. I'm still hanging in there. Day 5. and i'm doing OK. I browned chop meat in olive oil mixed with onions and seasoning and had a side salad yesterday and actually enjoyed it and felt satisfied. Today crab cake w salad for lunch then chicken / salad for dinner. ( Had to buy the really expensive crab cake at the store which is mostly crab instead of filling.)

I am not eating any bread, pasta, potaotes, corn or any starchy carb or yeast product or sugar. My carbs are vegetables and some fruit. How about dairy. I use about 3 oz of milk for a protein drink each morning. Is a slice of cheese ok ?

I am basically eating meat protein, veggies, nuts, and I do have a bowl of oatmeat in the morning. I know thats a carb. I may have to substitute that if this doesnt work.

I didn't do my mile walk at the park this morning and feeling guilty. I think I will eat lunch and go for that walk. No excuse really. The weather is beautiful. In fact I am sitting on my deck with my laptop writing this.

It helps me to come to this forum every day and read the diet wisdom of others and their progress.

Arkansas Kel
11-09-2011, 08:00 PM
If you are not losing weight I'd look into subbing out the oatmeal, milk, and fruits. I eat cheese, sometimes too much. If you are losing weight - carry on trooper and I'll meet you at the finish line sometime!!

I need to start some sort of exercise soon. I'm thinking strength training first, to protect my bad knee until I'm skinnier. I just cut my soda down, so I might still wait a bit while I adjust to this. I crave them lots still. One thing at a time....

carblover46
11-10-2011, 01:30 PM
Well, here I am day 7 . I will now try to eat the oatmeal every other day and if that doesn't work, eliminate it. I ate eggs yesterday. When one doesn't eat bread or cereal,, breakfast is a challenge.

One thing I am experiencing is not being able to fall asleep at night. I usualy do not have a problem with this but I feel jittery and cannot fall asleep until dawn. I am also a bit jittery due to carb withdrawal but that is getting a bit better. Anyone else have the sleep issue ????
.

Slow Weave
11-10-2011, 04:49 PM
I have always had a hard time staying motivated on diets. I'd drop a couple of pounds and then go right back to eating the wrong things. This time I went with low carb, low fat, high protein and buy a lot of packaged Proti Diet. It is actually working because the high protein keeps me from being hungry and the steady dropping is helping to keep me motivated. Since I really watch the carbs (average 40-50 a day) I have become a real label reader. I switched my fat free milk to the unsweetened Almond Milk because it had less of the bad things and even more calcium, etc! I eat at lots of cauliflower, broccoli, and asparagus. Check out Walden Farms products as they contain absolutely nothing in the way of calories, carbs, fat, etc. Don't know how they do it but their salad dressings are terrific.

souvenirdarling
12-10-2011, 11:08 AM
I'm with Arkansas_Kel: Perfection is too high of a goal - it's overwhelming. I need to think about it in terms of "one meal at a time". I am off and on the wagon all the time - but I know that eating low-carb is the best permanent way of eating for my mind and body.

Carblover, for breakfasts I have turned to a lot of egg scrambles and veggie omelets. I make a large omelet which covers me for 2 big breakfasts. All of my colleagues are jealous!

I've heard of people eating a lot of junk before bed, and it seems they were relying on the insulin reaction to fall asleep. I've heard limiting tv/computer before bedtime (apparently they stimulate with all them flashing lights.)

Personally, I take very deep breaths and make big sighing sounds, counting back from 10 with each breath, and picturing the numbers clearly in my mind to trick myself into relaxing :) I usually yawn by 8 and am out before I'm done.

AnaBee
12-13-2011, 01:28 AM
Welcome.

And as for your question - Absolutely!

The great thing about 3FC is that you can post and find posts on just about anything you could possibly need for weight loss.

I've been struggling with my weight since I was 5 (and I'm 45 now).

It's rather ironic that low-carb has turned out to be the only diet on which I can lose weight, without insane 24/7 hunger.

I did however have to redefine success to get this far. I also don't seem to be able to "stick to" any plan for more than a week or two - and in the past, I would believe (because there are a lot of people telling us this) that my "cheating" meant I was doomed to fail (or at least that I wasn't on the right plan for me).

I believed a lot of what I was taught about weight loss, but now I question everything, because in many ways, according to common weight loss wisdom, I am failing - but I've failed off 98 lbs, so this time's failure, has been better than all my previous successes.

If I had done better, I would have lost the weight faster - but that doesn't mean squat. The fact is that all the things that we've been taught "doom weight loss" don't - they just make the journey slower.

So, when you find yourself making mistakes, remember that the mistakes can slow you down, but they can only stop you if you let them.

I've learned that I don't just lose best, I also feel best on a low-carb diet, and yet I still let mysyelf get derailed by something yummy looking - far too frequently. I've made it this far just by being determined to get right back to what I know works (even if I keep falling off the horse, I keep getting right back on), as soon as possible.

There's a weird "diet tradition" that most of us follow without even questioning where we learned it. When we believe that we've broken our diet, or discovered that we don't like the plan we're on - we go on an eating spree, usually until we've gained all the weight back before going on to start another diet (either the same one we abandoned or a different one).

If we treated mountain climbing like this, as soon as we stumbled, we'd deliberately throw ourselves off the mountain to the bottom, so that we could "start fresh."

I've learned that I can eventually reach my goal, just by picking myself up after every mistake, and even if I make a mistake every day I can still end up moving in the direction I want to go, as long as I pick myself up as soon as I fall and don't let a mistake be an excuse to backslide.

With low-carb, the consequences of mistakes often look bigger than with other weight loss methods, and you need to know why, so that you don't panic when you see it happen.

Low-carb has the reputation that "going off" results in more extreme and rapid weight gain. There are several reasons, so if you're prepared, you can prevent most of the gain, and can control the rest.

One, the body needs more water to digest carbs, so when you first go onto low-carb, you'll probably see a very rapid drop in weight, that's thrilling - but is mostly water - the water you no longer need, because you're not eating many carbs. When you go off the low-carb diet, even for a day or two, you'll see a huge gain. It's just the water needed to digest the carbs you've eaten. If you return to low-cab, that water weight will come off again, rather quickly. It could take a week or even two if you happen to be around TOM when your body is retaining water for other reasons, but it will come back off.

Related to this is the idea that if you switch to a higher-calorie low-calorie plan, you're doomed to somehow gain ALL your weight back (untrue by the way). You will gain water weight for the reasons above, but you can still lose weight with other plans. It may be slower and more difficult, but it's doable.

Also worth mentioning, carbs do have an "addictive" property. If you read the book The End of Overeating, by David Kessler, he explains and illustrates this very well (especially carbs combined with salt and fat). Going back to carbs, can make you even hungrier for them - but if you're controlling your calorie intake and getting back to low-carb ASAP most of this gain isn't going to happen (just the water weight issues).



It's important to realize this, because if you eat something off plaln, even if the calorie count is relatively low, you could see a substantial gain on the scale and feel hopeless if you don't understand that in all liklihood, it's just temporary water weight that will disappear as soon as you're back on plan. (You haven't stored extra fat, just a little extra water).

If you decide that low-carb isn't for you, you just have to accept that you need that little bit of extra water, and not to worry about it, as you find another way to lose weight.

It also is not true that you can't do both low-carb and calorie counting or that you can't alternate low-carb with another plan. I do both, and it's worked fine, as long as I remember that my weight is going to naturally fluctuate more if I'm not on a stable carb-level. If I switch from my 1800 calorie low-carb plan to my 1800 calorie high-carb plan (which I do for situation in which low-carb is going to be difficullt, say for a family wedding or holiday meal) I'm going to see a temporary gain, but unless I exceed my calorie range it's not going to be a permament gain.


I didn't mean to write a book here. I tend to let my ideas run away with me.

Welcome, and good luck. Hang in there (and here) and you'll be fine.

I just stumbled onto this thread and I've been struggling this week. Thank you kaplods for this post! It is so helpful, and so motivating to me. I have printed it out to keep in my purse so that I can re-read it.

one small bowl
01-12-2012, 11:38 PM
Milk is high in sugar, use heavy cream and dilute with water to the volume of the milk for your shake. I used ground flaxseed meal for a hot cereal, it does not need to be cooked, I add boiling water to mine and a dab of nut butter. Yum.

I wouldn't worry about everything having to be the lowest carb possible. Find the balance that works for you. I have to stay under 50g to manage my diabetes and lose weight, but my husband loses great at around 100g and keeps his BG in the normal range, he is pre-D. Husband likes volume, I like density, eating a high calorie but very small amount. I like fat, he tries to avoid it.

Jack Sprat could eat no fat
His wife could eat no lean,
betwixt them both, they licked their platter clean.

lol

aliasihaya
01-15-2012, 08:08 PM
I need support as well. It's funny because I was just about to post this same exact thing when I saw this. I've been on the low carb diet for about a week and a half. I have diabetes and my nutritionist wants me to stay at 30 g per meal and 15 per snack. In the end that's not only supposed to help with my sugar but also my weight. So far I've noticed a little bit of a difference. But my carb cravings are terrible. I'm worried that I'm not going to last long due to the cravings. Not sure how to get past this. But I have to because I have to control my sugar and this does definitely help. But will my love for pasta bring me down?

AnaBee
01-17-2012, 12:04 AM
aliasihya, I would find eating that many carbs (30g per meal and 15g per snack) to be way too high for me, I would be climbing the wall with hunger and cravings. It seems weird when you're first cutting back, but you truly do get less hungry if you eat less carbs - but you're unlikely to hear that from a nutritionalist, since they are likely following the food pyramid. I feel weird for the first few days, but the cravings truly should vanish after that. Have you read Atkins or Protein Power? I also really like Mark's Daily Apple website, there's a lot of information in these sources to help explain how it works and to help convince you that it does work.

I used to love pasta too. But I'm gluten intolerant and so I can never eat wheat pasta again. You really can let it go :-) On atkins, the cravings vanish. There are so many other yummy things to eat.

btw, I love your quote :-)

banananutmuffin
01-19-2012, 11:35 AM
Speaking as a former carb-head, I've been totally surprised that going paleo has resulted in such weight loss for me.

I, too, had problems sleeping when I initially went paleo. And I DID use high-carb foods as a type of sedative. (I'd eat a huge carb heavy meal at 11pm or midnight.) I still haven't yet adjusted my sleep, although I do find I need less sleep when I'm eating this way.

As for motivation to stay on track, for me what works best is constantly reading about the benefits of a low carb diet. I always have a nutrition book on my kindle that's ready to go whenever I feel my motivation waning. A few I'd recommend are Wheat Belly, The Primal Blueprint, anything by Taubes, and Primal Body Primal Mind. Oh... and the one by Robb Wolf, too.