Food Talk And Fabulous Finds - Christmas dinner....help!!




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willbeayummymummy
10-17-2011, 06:15 PM
This might sound silly to worry about but I am thinking about christmas dinner and the amount of calories etc I will have.I know its a couple of months away but i dont want to work hard for it to be taken away at christmas time

My partner and I are having both sides of the family over which means loads of food,wine and snacks.

I would love to cook low fat things for the dinner but as everyone else coming is think or at least not over weight I feel it unfair on them.

Also my birthday is the 31st of dec and my man is planning on taking me out for a romantic dinner at one of our fav places.So I dont want to eat too much at christmas because of this also.

Any ideas??HELP!! xxx


willbeayummymummy
10-17-2011, 06:16 PM
also that should be thin not think....

QuilterInVA
10-17-2011, 06:48 PM
Why fill people with unhealthy food just because its Christmas?


PreciousMissy
10-17-2011, 06:58 PM
I'm not sure what plan you're on but whatever you eat you don't have to do in excess. If you have a couple glasses of wine and a small piece of cake everything isn't going to be "ruined"...unless you eat like that for a week straight and in excess.

You can have healthy snacks around, too. It doesn't have to be all healthy or all fattening, and you don't have to eat everything that is put out.

bargoo
10-17-2011, 07:07 PM
Turkey is not bad calorie wise. It's the stuffing, gravy and rich deserts, but you could have turkey , green salad. a low calorie vegie, fresh vegie tray with a lo cal dip maybe fresh fuit of some sort.

willbeayummymummy
10-17-2011, 07:07 PM
See I dont want to make the food unhealthy, plus turkey is low in fat etc, I have been researching on low fat stuffings etc.

@PreciousMissy thanks for the advice, im wanting to eat on christmas day and not feel guilty this has helped me relax a bit more, i also think its because my ultra critical mum in law is coming and she judges everything I do :( xxxx

willbeayummymummy
10-17-2011, 07:08 PM
Also I have found out that weight watchers do low calorie wine....yaaaay.x

banananutmuffin
10-17-2011, 09:37 PM
I feel your pain. Hubby and I both come from families that expect "traditional" foods at holiday meals... the whole gamut: mashed potatoes, sausage stuffing, homemade rolls, gravy, green bean casserole, sweet potato casserole with marshmallows... you get the idea. I could bring a veggie tray or some steamed spinach, but no one would touch it and everyone would look at me like I'd sprouted horns.

I think I'm simply going to approach the upcoming holidays with the thought of "choose the best, choose what I rarely eat, exercise portion control, and RELAX." There are some things that I can eat all year long--mashed potatoes are something Hubby makes once every month or so, and I make homemade rolls every few weeks. I LOVE those things, but I can get them other times of the year.

On the other hand, my MIL's sausage stuffing is something I ONLY get at the holidays. So I will definitely have some, but I will try and keep my portion moderate, and I will savor every bite.

My SIL's "cheese" dip is okay, but not great. So I'll pass on that, because it's not that fantastic anyway.

And, in the end, one or two special meals won't derail you're entire diet plan. Just get right back on track after that meal, and you probably won't even see a blip on the scale.

ChickieChicks
10-17-2011, 09:59 PM
There are just some foods in life that I will never give up. I make some MEAN bakes beans...like crack, they are so good! When we have a BBQ, I preplan what I will eat. 1/3 c. of baked beans, or 1/2 c. I know the stats. Burger on bun with just mustard...I've always liked them that way. So I know going into it that I have spent X amount of cals. if I see something there that looks yummy, I follow the 1/4 c. rule. TRY IT! Put a dab on your plate. I'd rather have a smidge of everything that looks good.

Riddy
10-17-2011, 10:10 PM
I feel your pain! My birthday is New Year's Eve, too, so I get what you're concerned about. It's so easy to just let the bad eating from Christmas just stretch out til New Year, because you know you'll be eating bad on your birthday, too. :o

I'm planning on using Banananutmuffin's strategy for Thanksgiving and Christmas. I know some of the things my aunts make just aren't worth the calories, but I will definitely have some of my mom's sweet potatoes.

Since it's your house, you can definitely put out some healthy options, even if they're just for you. Maybe start looking now for a good fake-out recipe that will fool your family into thinking it's decadent. :p

juliana77
10-17-2011, 10:17 PM
Last year I made roasted butternut squash instead of the candied yams, and sautéed green beans instead of the casserole, and everyone loved it!

butterflymama
10-17-2011, 10:51 PM
Seriously one Christmas dinner/party and one birthday dinner is not going to do any real harm to you as long as you are eating healthy and moving your body the other days.

The damage comes from overly restricting ourselves and then "punishing" ourselves for failing when we "lose control" and eat too much. Usually the punishment takes form in more unhealthy eating.

We just had Canadian Thanksgiving and I went into it with the idea that I was going to enjoy my Thanksgiving dinner and eat whatever I felt I needed but to take the time and really enjoy it and my family. That ended up being one plate of a little bit of turkey, roasted veggies, a bit of sweet potatoes casserole with candied pecans on top, a bit of mashed potatoes with gravy, and a yummy caramel apple that I made with the kids from apples we picked at the orchard the day before! It was lovely and I was very satisfied. I then had a small bowl of chips while watching TV that evening.

The next morning I had an eggs and sausage breakfast with my mom, son and DH.

Anyway after a few meals that were higher in calories over the weekend I still ended up with a small lose at the end of the week. Yes maybe I would have lost more weight if I din't indulge but I also would have felt deprived and would have been triggered to binge.

Now I am not saying that to let go the whole Christmas season but I wouldn't worry about a meal or two. Which is what I plan on doing during the holidays.

April Snow
10-17-2011, 11:04 PM
I've taken the "it's just one day" idea and turned it around and at the holiday meals I've been at lately, I stuck with meat, salad and grilled veggies. And I still go to enjoy spending the time with my friends and family and continuing to lose weight.

Yes, it's just one day, but it's also "just food." And it will be here next year too. I plan to enjoy it all next year (in moderation) while maintaining my new, slimmer body and active lifestyle.

berryblondeboys
10-17-2011, 11:12 PM
Seriously one Christmas dinner/party and one birthday dinner is not going to do any real harm to you as long as you are eating healthy and moving your body the other days.

The damage comes from overly restricting ourselves and then "punishing" ourselves for failing when we "lose control" and eat too much. Usually the punishment takes form in more unhealthy eating.

We just had Canadian Thanksgiving and I went into it with the idea that I was going to enjoy my Thanksgiving dinner and eat whatever I felt I needed but to take the time and really enjoy it and my family. That ended up being one plate of a little bit of turkey, roasted veggies, a bit of sweet potatoes casserole with candied pecans on top, a bit of mashed potatoes with gravy, and a yummy caramel apple that I made with the kids from apples we picked at the orchard the day before! It was lovely and I was very satisfied. I then had a small bowl of chips while watching TV that evening.

The next morning I had an eggs and sausage breakfast with my mom, son and DH.

Anyway after a few meals that were higher in calories over the weekend I still ended up with a small lose at the end of the week. Yes maybe I would have lost more weight if I din't indulge but I also would have felt deprived and would have been triggered to binge.

Now I am not saying that to let go the whole Christmas season but I wouldn't worry about a meal or two. Which is what I plan on doing during the holidays.

This is how I will handle it too. these are special meals and in our family that really is only a handful of times a year. I would rather eat one slice of really scrumptious REAL pumpkin pie, than a not satisfying slice of pumpkin mousse. Both are unneeded calories, but one I would savor, the other would disappoint me in the waste of calories.

And fact is, a meal, a day is not the problem. it's the lifestyle of overeating taht is teh problem.

shcirerf
10-17-2011, 11:38 PM
Like many others, there are certain foods I only have access to on holidays! One being gramma's home made pecan pie! The stuff should turn your blood to sludge, with the amount of sugar and fat. But since I only get it on Thanksgiving and Christmas, I eat a small slice. And I enjoy it!

I would suggest, make the meal mostly as healthy as you can, but don't get freaked out about it.

Enjoy the family and the holidays, plan for the meals, and stay on track on all the other days, and you'll be fine!

It's a life style! Good most of the time, have a little fun too!

EZMONEY
10-17-2011, 11:41 PM
I agree with the "it's only one meal and traditions are traditions"...and since this is not a "we are all on a diet" crowd I say to....

stick with your basics Thanksgiving meal of Turkey and a few "normal" sides...

but invite the rest to bring a side dish of their choice....when we do big dinners/BBQ's we cook the main course and others bring side dishes...we have a list going so no one duplicates...how much macaroni salad do ya need?

That way everybody has turkey and everyone has at least one side dish they like....helps with the cost too!

Do the same with the desserts and appetizers.

zenor77
10-18-2011, 02:09 AM
I don't know about you, but Christmas isn't the reason I gained weight. It was overeating, the other 364 days of the year, that was my problem.

It's only one day. Since you are concerned, perhaps just indulge in your favorites and take smaller portions?

Esofia
10-18-2011, 08:11 AM
Don't buy or make anything so huge that there will be significant leftovers. I think that's one of the big problems with foodie festivals of whatever faith, people overcater and then it's not just one day, they're overeating for the whole week.

Make healthy snacks as well as unhealthy ones, though be prepared for people to do the unexpected and wolf down the healthy snacks before you can get to them. (Or they might sneer, in which case think of something suitable to say in advance. It can go either way, in my experience as a vegan, but most of the time people don't even notice. And the sneering was probably just some of my family who are known for being highly unpleasant people.) Raw vegetables cut into sticks with houmous or what have you, for instance.

Provide pleasant non-alcoholic drinks as well as wine. Unless your families live on the doorstep, people will be driving anyway. I can't remember which ones are good low-calorie non-alcoholic drinks, I basically live on water and herbal tea myself, but I'm sure there are lots of pleasant options. That way you can alternate wine with other drinks, and even avoid wine altogether or just have the one glass if that's what you prefer.

Do remember that while there are traditions in many countries and cultures of feeding your guests as if you were stuffing geese, it's not actually necessary in order to be a good host, and no one really enjoys indigestion or weight gain. There's a very similar conversation to this which I spotted in the 100lb forum about the Jewish festivals. And hey, at least we're not in America where they have Thanksgiving and Christmas pretty much back to back!

As for worrying about feeding your guests low-fat foods, do you honestly think they are going to come away from your Christmas dinner feeling hungry, let alone malnourished?! (Assuming you're not talking about handing them each a head of lettuce and nothing else.) Make them a delicious meal, make it healthy while incorporating traditional elements, and I'm sure you'll be fine. If you take potatoes, for instance, there are umpteen different ways of serving potatoes and some are far, far healthier than others while still being tasty and attractive. A fruit platter can be stunning for dessert, as well as light and refreshing after the traditional heavy meal, and there are probably ways you could make it look Christmassy, for instance by how you arrange the fruit or by how you decorate it. My mother used to do them on this big black platter, and she'd buy a few exotic fruit (I remember starfruit, for instance) and arrange them artfully over the more usual stuff. That plus some mince pies could be great.

I come from an English Jewish family which also met up for Christmas, so I've experience of both traditions. The meals at my aunt's were traditional and well-cooked, but they were also heavy and left everyone feeling overfed, not to mention almost exactly the same every year. My mother started to hold her own dinners, and she also started to experiment with tradition. Whenever she did, the guests wolfed down the food and praised it generously. There was a fabulous stew that was traditional for Jewish New Year in Iran, for instance. For Passover, you're not allowed to eat wheat, so naturally everyone goes mad baking all sorts of desserts and pastries made with ground almonds and the like. One year my mother skipped all that (serious heresy, believe me) and bought some meringue nests. She put a scoop of raspberry sorbet in the middle of each nest, arranged some raspberries around the edge of each plate, and I went into the garden for sprigs of lemon balm to put on the sorbet. Quick, easy, healthy, not particularly traditional, and the guests absolutely raved over it. They'd already had plenty of traditional Passover food earlier in the meal, so it's not as if they were feeling deprived.

willbeayummymummy
10-18-2011, 10:16 AM
Thanks so so much for the advice guys :) all very good and Ill be following what you said, Im just going to stay away from the roast tattie, my dad makes the best and in a massive amount.I know if I have one i WILL have 15 more.

I will def do trying the 1/4 of everything rather than loads of everything and I hate brussel sprouts, I know they are one of the healthiest bit but im just not a fan!!

Im excited as its our babies first christmas too and she will be old enough to try out some food which will encourage us all to cook without salt so she can taste things.

Thanks again xxx

Esofia
10-18-2011, 12:41 PM
Apparently the brussels sprouts thing is genetic. There's a bitter compound in there, and some people have the gene to taste it (and therefore think brussels sprouts are vile) and some don't (and therefore think they taste fine). I do like them, but considering that they overcook easily and a lot of people hate them, I think they're an odd choice of vegetable to become traditional in this way. I suspect there may be a similar genetic thing with fish, because some people absolutely cannot stand to go anywhere near it, myself amongst them.

I'm glad you're feeling better equipped, and congratulations on the baby! Out of curiosity, why are you worrying about Christmas so far ahead anyway?