Weight Loss News and Current Events - Dr. Oz




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carolr3639
10-11-2011, 12:09 PM
What's with Dr. Oz putting his stamp on the hCG diet?


sontaikle
10-11-2011, 12:34 PM
Was this in his show or on a website or product? Dr. Oz has said he never endorses anything and if you see his face on a website or product that it was put there without his permission.

nelie
10-11-2011, 12:52 PM
Honestly, I believe Dr Oz has gone to the land of the cuckoo. I've heard about the various things he has been talking about on his show lately and it is a lot of crazy nonsense stuff. I wouldn't be surprised if he did endorse HCG.


EagleRiverDee
10-11-2011, 01:17 PM
What's with Dr. Oz putting his stamp on the hCG diet?

I didn't know he did that but I saw an interview he did recently where he was advocating we do 80% more weight loss surgeries in the US. That stunned me.

The hCG diet, according to my own doctor, is not healthy. She said she has seen people's cholesterol skyrocket on the diet, and then not come back down when people go off the diet and they end up having to go on drugs. To me, the hCG diet is like the old Phen-fen. It works, at the cost of your health. It's not for me.

98DaysOfSummer
10-11-2011, 01:18 PM
But that's an ad.

I can find a few things where he's quoted as saying, "It's worth investigating" but the only things that claim he ENDORSES it are selling the products...and that's not reliable.

stellarosa27
10-11-2011, 02:57 PM
I didn't know he did that but I saw an interview he did recently where he was advocating we do 80% more weight loss surgeries in the US. That stunned me.



As in "We should do more WL surgeries?"

From what I've seen on his show, I'm not a fan of his.

carolr3639
10-11-2011, 03:24 PM
He has a five part program on Youtube and I think the date on it is Aug of this year. He has a woman dr. on who does the hCG diet for her patients.

kaplods
10-11-2011, 03:57 PM
I've stopped watching, because the focus of his show seems to have shifted from "practical, common sense, interesting information" to primarily entertainment (often sensational and misleading).

It's not always clear when he's playing "devil's advocate" in criticizing good advice, or when he's endorsing a bizarre practice, or considering it "interesting, but unproven."

I was also slightly disappointed with his endorsement and affiliation with Weight Watchers. Not because Weight Watchers isn't a good program, but because I would expect him to have been aware of the research finding TOPS and other non-profit weight loss programs to be as effective as Weight Watchers - and rather than remaining neutral or endorsinge an inexpensive, non-profit weight loss program that could benefit a wider audience, he chose a program more lucrative for him (because TOPS as a non-profit organization, would not be able to pay him much if anything for his endorsement).

I don't fault the man for having a profit motive, but it does influence my impression of the show and the information he presents. Because I have a fair understanding of endorsement deals, I know that his partnership with Weight Watchers means that it's extremely unlikely that TOPS will ever even be mentioned on his show (except perhaps to criticise it). Which is unfortunate, because it's an option that is affordable to more of his audience (A year's TOPS membership usually costs less than one month of Weight Watchers, and there are often ways to make it even cheaper because of the rewards for loss).

The WW deal is really the least of my concerns with the show though, because I expect television celebrities to have a profit motive (otherwise, they'd probably remain in the private sector). It takes a certain level of ambition to become a celebrity. The truly "accidental" celebrity is rare.

EagleRiverDee
10-11-2011, 04:42 PM
As in "We should do more WL surgeries?"

From what I've seen on his show, I'm not a fan of his.

Yes. It was in Prevention Magazine, and he said we only do 20% of the weight loss surgeries in America that we should. Prior to reading that, I was a fan. After that, I have to seriously question him. There are valid reasons for WL surgery and for some people it's the only option, but for the majority of people what is required is a lifestyle change that includes choosing healthy foods, healthy portions and daily exercise. And he didn't mention that at all.

stellarosa27
10-11-2011, 04:46 PM
Seems a bit misplaced in "Prevention" magazine then...

And also, after the WL surgery, you do need to actually a dopt a healthy life style, it's not a quick-fix by any means.

milmin2043
10-13-2011, 01:47 AM
I agree with kaplods. I used to really like the Dr. Oz show. Now it has gone more mainstream and he's always sensationalizing things for ratings. I know that's how he'll stay on TV, but it won't be with me watching anymore.

The thing that really bugs me (other than the WW endorsement, which I also find annoying), is how every single day he is talking about taking an additional supplement. If you took all the supplements he touts on his show, you would never need to eat, you'd be full of vitamins. It's crazy.

stellarosa27
10-14-2011, 09:42 AM
The thing that really bugs me (other than the WW endorsement, which I also find annoying), is how every single day he is talking about taking an additional supplement. If you took all the supplements he touts on his show, you would never need to eat, you'd be full of vitamins. It's crazy.

Reminds me of a quote from the Big Bang Theory, when Sheldon asks Penny if she really likes "expensive urine" as she goes to the vitamin department :D

Bellamack
10-14-2011, 09:52 AM
Yes. It was in Prevention Magazine, and he said we only do 20% of the weight loss surgeries in America that we should. Prior to reading that, I was a fan. After that, I have to seriously question him. There are valid reasons for WL surgery and for some people it's the only option, but for the majority of people what is required is a lifestyle change that includes choosing healthy foods, healthy portions and daily exercise. And he didn't mention that at all.

I have been a fan of Dr. Oz, but haven't had time to watch in a few months. I wonder if he was talking about Weight Loss Surgery for the extreme cases, ie diabetes, high cholesterol, etc. It costs America millions in meds, hospital visits and lost time at work.

I can not even imagine him endorsing hcg.

I don't think he "endorsed" Weight Watchers per say,he just tells patients that it works. That is what my doctor does, same with different programs that work for quiting smoking. I think when you are in the spot light, there are alot of inaccurate reporting and you have to listen to the wording quite carefully.

stellarosa27
10-14-2011, 01:37 PM
If you go to the WW webite, it says "endorsed by Dr. Oz." They couldn't do that unless there was some sort of deal.

Also, you can be thin and have high cholesterol, it's all about your diet. This country is entirely too dependant on quick fixes as it is, and it doesn't help that a medical professional (albeit a celebrity) is endorsing MORE surgeries.

These aren't "easy" procedures, and to say we need to do 80% more is slightly ludicrous, when for many people diet and exercise CAN be effective.

kaplods
10-14-2011, 02:25 PM
.

I don't think he "endorsed" Weight Watchers per say,he just tells patients that it works. That is what my doctor does, same with different programs that work for quiting smoking. I think when you are in the spot light, there are alot of inaccurate reporting and you have to listen to the wording quite carefully.


Actually, I did listen to the wording quite carefully. But I should have been more careful in MY wording. He did not simply endorse Weight Watchers or tell audiences that "it works." Neither of which would have bothered me. Even a simple endorsement deal, in which he appeared in WW commercial or two to recommend the program wouldn't have bothered me as much as the reality.


Rather, Dr. Oz has "partnered with" Weight Watcher's on a project called the "Million Dollar You" challenge, which will end in a televised "American Idol" style "vote-off" show, and a million dollar cash prize.

This is far more than an endorsement deal, it's a joint project - making WW and Dr Oz, business partners (at least on this project).

I have nothing against the project, itself - it actually sounds like a great idea.

Here's a youtube video of Dr. Oz explaining the project

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_TeVExkA4A


In this video, Dr. Oz clarifies that WW membership is not required (this was not made clear in the spot that I'd seen at the end of one of his shows).

I'm glad to hear that WW membership is not a requirement of participation, but the partnership deal still rubs me the wrong way, as well as the nature of the project - it's going to make both Dr. Oz and Weight Watchers a lot of money. And there's nothing wrong with that, but it's an amount of money that can cloud impartiality.

nelie
10-14-2011, 02:32 PM
WW and HCG are on an entirely different spectrum. WW has been around for decades with proven long term success and no long term ill effects. HCG is a subscription medication being prescribed for an unapproved use (a doctor could lose his license for this). There are no long term studies. VLCDs in general have a high regain percentage. It doesn't make sense to approve of it or say it works if you are unsure of the side effects.

EagleRiverDee
10-14-2011, 04:33 PM
HCG is a subscription medication being prescribed for an unapproved use (a doctor could lose his license for this). There are no long term studies. VLCDs in general have a high regain percentage. It doesn't make sense to approve of it or say it works if you are unsure of the side effects.

I don't think a doctor necessarily risks his license for prescribing off-label prescriptions- doctors do this all the time when a drug is noted to have a side effect that is beneficial. This is how we found out that you could use Wellbutrin to quit smoking (it's labeled usage is as an anti-depressant) as just one example.

However, many "health food" stores sell the HCG diet and it's not got anything to do with doctors.

You are correct that there are no long term studies. I am very wary of the hCG diet because it's already showing a deleterious effect on cholesterol. I recall when the drug Phen-Fen came out and people lost so much weight on it and then it destroyed their heart valves. I prefer to wait and see that something is safe and that it doesn't have undesired side effects, particularly ones that aren't reversible, before I try something.

Suzanne 3FC
10-14-2011, 06:04 PM
Dr Oz has never endorsed hcg diets.

But he does provide air-time to every wacky diet out there because that draws in more viewers which means more advertising dollars for the show.

Every now and then you can see him cringe and he'll try to establish that an idea is not healthy, but most of the time he tries to be very neutral and that is misleading. I've also noticed that he'll briefly mention something in passing without explaining the details, which also gives the wrong impression of an endorsement.

IMO his decision to approach diet products this way has hurt his credibility.

milmin2043
10-19-2011, 01:33 AM
Dr Oz has never endorsed hcg diets.

But he does provide air-time to every wacky diet out there because that draws in more viewers which means more advertising dollars for the show.

Every now and then you can see him cringe and he'll try to establish that an idea is not healthy, but most of the time he tries to be very neutral and that is misleading. I've also noticed that he'll briefly mention something in passing without explaining the details, which also gives the wrong impression of an endorsement.

IMO his decision to approach diet products this way has hurt his credibility.

This is my thought exactly. I really loved Dr Oz when his show first premiered. All good things come to an end. The celebrity, advertising machine has run him over, I'm afraid. :(

crimsons
10-19-2011, 01:47 AM
I saw both shows in question. He is absolutely against the hcg diet, *however* he pointed out ways to naturally increase the human growth hormone production that our bodies make. Apropos Weight Watchers, it is definitely partnered with Dr. Oz on something called "Transformation Nation," which is a sort of motivational program on his website that viewers can join.
http://doctoroz.sharecare.com/
On the show he announced an offer that WW would give away a free membership if you signed up by a certain date. Although I think this is a great thing, it came about a week after he announced he NEVER endorses any product...and there he was endorsing a product.

I'm pretty grossed out by Oz, he gives me the creeps. He ends up repeating a lot of advice, and it just seems he's running out of things to talk about and mostly gives spotty tips that don't add up to much. My ex-husband was on the show once, and he and the producers spent a huge amount of time concocting graphics and "party tricks" that mostly had entertainment, not practical, value. Also the way he interacts with guests sometimes very much creeps me out what with the fake-y handholding and physical contact that at times seems forced.

sontaikle
10-19-2011, 09:06 AM
My mother often watches the show and I think you have to just have a brain to pick out the gems from the load of garbage. I've seen a lot of useful stuff mixed in there. It's often pushed aside for the "sensational" part of the show, but he still gets it in.

I wouldn't go out of my way to watch it, but since my mother has it on and I usually do my work in the living room, I happen to catch some of it :joker:

Yesterday for example, he had a small segment where people who lost a lot of weight came in and showed off things they found that made it easier to lose weight. One woman who lost 185 pounds showed off this machine that could instantly make frozen fruit into a nice, ice-cream like treat and it's just made out of fruit. It was certainly something I'd like to try (I LOVE fruit) and it seemed a bit easier to work than my ice cream maker.

mzKiki
10-19-2011, 09:18 PM
I saw an ep where he said he was against the HCG diet based on the requirement that you eat only about 500 calories a day.
But he did have people on that show who were saying how they loved the diet and showing their dramatic before and after pictures.
I too used to love Dr. Oz and use to DVR when I was at work, I barely watch it now.

Suzanne 3FC
10-19-2011, 11:29 PM
I'm a big fan of the Berkeley Wellness Letter, from the University of California- Berkeley. They do a fantastic job of covering the latest health advice and sift the hype from reality. One of the articles in the October issue covered a supplement that was mentioned on Dr. Oz recently. They ended the article with:

As for the Dr. Oz and Oprah shows, they may be good entertainment but their medical advice is often questionable.

bargoo
10-20-2011, 08:34 AM
I have not been a big fan of Dr. Oz , I think he is more interested in getting ratings than giving good solid medical advice.

crimsons
10-27-2011, 12:52 AM
I just heard a podcast about how the amino acids craze was very 1980s -- and Oz is constantly pushing one called Arginine -- except that they're good for heart health. Shall I say I'd really like to see his investment portfolio, especially regarding all these supplements he's hawking. Also now his daughter, who is only 24, is the "healthy living" co-host on another ABC show. She's actually very likable and dynamic, but doesn't seem to have all that much information. She wrote a "best-selling" book on avoiding the freshman 15 weight gain...however, she has, er, never been mentioned in the NY Times, which is *the* source of the bestseller list. So it was a best seller somewhere, but not nationally. And although she does look healthy, she's a bit chunky for someone specializing in weight control. Or maybe I've just been hitting the "Instyle" mag too often...

EagleRiverDee
10-27-2011, 01:36 PM
His daughter's book is called "The Dorm Room Diet" (http://www.amazon.com/Dorm-Room-Diet-Creating-Lifestyle/dp/1557049157/ref=sr_1_14?ie=UTF8&qid=1319733040&sr=8-14) but he is listed as a co-author. Amazon does have it listed as a best seller.

I think with Dr. Oz, or any celebrity, you have to glean the good from the bad in what they say. I will still read the articles he's featured in but I'm going to use my own common sense.

crimsons
10-27-2011, 02:28 PM
@EagleRiver, I must say Daphne's book does look pretty good and fills a niche that no one thought of before. Dr. Oz wrote the foreword, which is legitimate standard procedure for anyone to boost sales -- get an authority or expert to write it and gain more credibility and publicity.

I'm an author, and I just get so peeved when someone's marketing machine mis-uses "best-selling..." Every book on Amazon has a "Best Selling Rank," even if they're #2,000,000 in sales. It's a big joke among authors that you're hunched over the computer googling your ranking right after pub date, LOL!

Daphne's book is currently about #20,000, and only has 24 reader reviews (a least a few of which may have been placed by her publisher and friends), which is by no means a bestseller -- I'm not arguing, it just annoys me that it's marketed that way. (My first book is pretty old and started out in the 1,000s and currently in the #300,000s lol, but still has a "best sellers rank!"

Mine has fallen on and off various Amazon "best sellers in X category" as nearly everyone's book does...but I never got to the status of one of my friends, who's been on the NY Times bestseller list with a fun book about dogs for over a year. Amazon has all kinds of really obscure "best seller lists" like those for five-legged Minotaurs who live in Lichtenstein and love gilded marshmallow-almond s'mores. I exaggerate -- but almost anyone can claim the status however the gold standard of the pub industry is the NY Times list, followed by things like Publishers Weekly and the now-defunct Kirkus reviews.

Anyway, forgive me for ranting. It does look like a good book and I wish her well! (And you too -- kudos on your weight loss so far!)

EagleRiverDee
10-27-2011, 03:51 PM
@Crimsons- rants are okay! You're among friends. Besides, I just learned a lot about the publishing world that I didn't know. Thanks! :)

luckymommy
10-29-2011, 12:01 PM
I do like some things about Dr. Oz's show but I just pick and choose what I want to know more about and then I do my own research.

I did find the WW show to be bothersome for the same reasons as Kaplods mentioned.

Then there are all the endless supplements! My goodness, according to his show there are a million and one supplements that we can take just for benefiting weight loss! ;) I did buy some supplements that he recommended on his show and I didn't notice any difference in my weight loss. It was a waste of money. That doesn't mean that it wouldn't help someone else, but after that, I decided to not pay a whole lot of attention to the supplement advice either.

Honestly, I'm burned out with his show. I do TiVo it so that if there's a topic I'm interested in, I'll skim through it but overall, it's not the high quality show I wish it were. I think what made Oprah successful is that she didn't talk down to her audience. She assumed the audience was intelligent. I don't think Dr. Oz's show has that same assumption in mind. It's too gimmicky in my opinion.

kaplods
10-29-2011, 01:13 PM
I think with Dr. Oz, or any celebrity, you have to glean the good from the bad in what they say. I will still read the articles he's featured in but I'm going to use my own common sense.


I mostly agree, except that it seems to me, that as a physician (speaking as such, giving medical advice), Dr. Oz. should be held to a different standard than Paris Hilton.


But that's not how "edutainment" works, and I'm not sure that the average viewer realizes just how crazy some of his advice is, because he seems so caring, intelligent and sincere (he does have charisma).

And he also has an incredible talent at making nonsense sound reasonable, so it takes more than common sense to evaluate his advice. Much of what he says, you'd have to go to medical school to be able to evaluate.

In getting my BA and MA degrees in psychology, I had to take undergraduate and graduate coursework in bioology, chemistry, physiology, research methods, statistics and the psychology coursework also covered a good deal of human development, physiology (mostly brain physiology) and even nutrition.

Without that background, I'd have no way of "gleaning" the good from the bad. And even with it, I can easily get caught up in "hey that sounds perfectly reasonable," until I go looking for the science behind his recommendations (and again I need my science background to evaluate what I see online - because crackpot theories often have a lot of self-proclaimed experts "supporting" them. Recognizing fact from crackpot theory isn't easy without a strong science background, which most people do not have).

EagleRiverDee
10-29-2011, 07:15 PM
Kaplods- those are good points. You're right, as a doctor he should be held to a higher standard.

crimsons
10-29-2011, 08:03 PM
Did anyone else watch his show about the "preshistoric diet" last week? It was pretty entertaining and made a good point. The scenario: three women agreed to eat the same diet zoo animals consumed (this based on a previous study in England giving 9 people the same diet as zoo apes). The ladies spent 48 hours living in a tent at the zoo and eating only raw fruits, veggies and for some reason, a single olive for salt (WTF? I think they wanted sugar, not salt!) No caffeine, fats (except for raw ones in seeds and avocado) or processed sugar.

Not surprisingly, the womens' average BP, cholesterol, triglycerides and weight went down significantly. I think the triglycerides decreased by 20% or so! Well, I thought I'd give it a whirl this weekend, so I hit the farmers' market on Friday and am trying some new veg and also enjoying some other raw for the first time. I am surprised that some I usually cook or juice (kale, red cabbage, pattypan squash) are tasty raw. I took my BP at the drugstore this afternoon and it was down, although that's not exactly a scientific result. But it's gone from 128/86 to 118/81 in a day. Then again, I didn't have any caffeine this morning!

Anyway, if nothing more, it's getting me more aware and appreciative of what's going in my mouth, and how delicious plain plants sometimes are. That was one of his better shows in awhile, until we got to the ubiquitous supplement segment...

kaplods
10-29-2011, 10:33 PM
The olive makes sense, because we need some sodium in our diet. Sorry for the TMI, but I would guess that apes get their salt and other mineral needs met by means that humans would find objectionable (such as by eating dirt and insects, or by grooming themselves and their friends by licking each other). Gorillas and chimps are also known to eat/drink excrement and urine, and I have read that the reason they do so is for the mineral content).

Yep, I'd much rather have an olive.

Tejas
10-30-2011, 02:13 PM
If you're interested in the primative (Primal) diet, look at Mark's Daily Apple.

124chicksinger
10-30-2011, 02:40 PM
Dr. Oz seems now to be in bed with those from whom he can profit. There is a difference between "endorsing" a product without pay and getting in bed with companies who put money into your bank account. Just my opinion, of course, and I was never a staunch fan (he's on when I'm at work and I don't make it a point to catch his show) but celebrity endorsements sometimes mean nothing.

BerkshireGrl
10-31-2011, 12:46 AM
I don't watch Dr. Oz very often, but I was pretty unimpressed with his show with Gary Taubes of Good Calories, Bad Calories fame.

Gary Taubes writes about the encounter here (http://garytaubes.com/2011/03/dose-of-intervention-land-of-dr-oz/) on his site... and the video of the show, cut into Parts 1, 2 and 3, can be seen here (http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/man-who-thinks-everything-dr-oz-says-wrong-pt-1) on Dr. Oz's site. I mean, the title of Dr. Oz's show alone here, "The Man Who Thinks Everything Dr. Oz Says is Wrong", is just ridiculous.

Dr. Oz comes off to me as a showboater, insincere and misleading, while Gary Taubes is bemused and tolerant of being patted and patronized. And by the way, Gary Taubes later posted his official cholesterol test readings, and they were all within normal, healthy levels.

So... I'm not a Dr. Oz fan :lol:

LovelyLeah
10-31-2011, 12:12 PM
He's a liar for the sake of ratings. He was actually facing lawsuits for slander with his episode about apple juice containing arsenic. The reality is that he used the wrong tests and promoted the use of the wrong forms of test strips to check apple juice. There is a major difference between the tests for water (which he used) and the tests for juice. Juice is different because of the acids or the proteins or something I can't quite remember and so they have certain tests designed to accurately detect the real levels.

The FDA mostly gave him a slap on the wrist because there was nothing they could really do legally but I heard that some of juice companies were looking at suing him for slander. After that I have refused to watch him. It's wrong for him to create unnecessary fear in people.

Suzanne 3FC
10-31-2011, 09:30 PM
I don't watch Dr. Oz very often, but I was pretty unimpressed with his show with Gary Taubes of Good Calories, Bad Calories fame.



I'm not going to agree or disagree with an opinion on Taubes in this post, but I would like to say that in this case Oz stood up for what he believed in and it seems to be one of the few shows where he didn't just open up a promotional platform for any person with a diet book or product to sell. In my personal opinion I think he was very fair to Taubes by offering him a large amount of time to discuss his views and I thought Oz was very polite in his manner of disagreeing - but at least in this case he admitted that he disagreed with a guest which he doesn't often do and that's my problem with Oz these days.

EagleRiverDee
11-01-2011, 02:56 PM
Prior to this, I had read Dr. Oz's articles in Prevention Magazine but had never seen his show. Because Tony Horton was on Dr. Oz yesterday, I recorded the show. For those that don't know, Tony is a trainer known for such programs as P90X, and 10 Minute Trainer. I have to agree with skeptics on this thread now, because Dr. Oz was essentially promising major results to people doing 10 minutes of exercise a day, but all his success stories were people that had done P90X which is an hour a day, 6 days a week. And that was never pointed out. 10 minutes a day is better than nothing, but it's not the same as an hour a day.

Candi44
11-01-2011, 03:20 PM
I absolutely love Dr Oz

Allura Beatu
11-04-2011, 04:58 AM
What's with Dr. Oz putting his stamp on the hCG diet?

I was extremely surprised when I saw that episode. I didn't expect his endorsement of that diet.

Suzanne 3FC
11-05-2011, 11:49 PM
He devoted a lot of time to the diet and allowed views from both sides of the debate. But he ended with serious cautions.

People in the audience described horrific side effects.

A doctor said it can increase risk of some kinds of cancer. Another doctor said it can cause sudden cardiac death or gallbladder disease.

At the end of the program, Dr Oz said:
* Do NOT purchase hcg products that are sold to consumers.
* Do NOT consume less than 1200 calories
* He believes more studies are needed on hcg injections and so far there are NO studies showing it is effective
* He said if you really must try this, only do it with a real doctor with constant monitoring.

He published this article against the diet on his site:
http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/hcg-diet-fact-vs-fiction