Veggie Challenged - How do you get your kids to eat veggies?




Mama Bee
08-10-2011, 09:34 PM
Our oldest is 3, and meal times have become a challenge for him...

The kid will eat pretty much everything as long as its not green. Usually he'll eat everything on his plate but the veggie and then throw a fit about being full. Now I don't want to make the kiddo overstuff himself... but I do want him to eat his vegetables. Lately I'll make his plate up with the full serving of veggie that I'd like him to have, and a very small serving of the other stuff, with the rule that when he clears his plate he can have more meat/potatoes/whatever else is on there that he likes.

I always liked veggies when I was kid, and I always had to eat them before I left the table even if I didn't... but this kid will sit there at the table for 2 hours to avoid eating his veggies.


SLIMplicity
08-10-2011, 09:55 PM
Try making it fun..
I have two boys aged 5 yrs and 3 yrs.. what works for me is I usually like to give them raw veggies as opposed to cooked..
I will cut up cucumbers, broccolli:broc:, celery, baby carrots :carrot:and give them dips. Some dips that they like are Ranch dressing and they really like Hummus.

Another way is making a homemade cheese sauce and getting them to dip their veggies in the cheese sauce.
My kids love their dips and they can be very healthy for them.

:hungry: Another thing I do is serve the my meals in "courses".
I will always start of the meal with salad or veggies first, once those are all eaten then the meat and potatoes or pasta or soup or whatever. I keep the other stuff out of sight and make the veggies the star of the meal.. This way they cant say they are to full for their veggies..its always first..

I hope this helps, let me know if u have any questions..

iaradajnos
08-10-2011, 10:07 PM
I have two boys. The oldest, 12, now prefers raw broccoli, cauliflower, bell peppers, etc. The little one, 10, prefers cooked and seasoned. The oldest also like raw, plain tofu, plain brown rice, and milk. I don't know what planet my own kid now lives but this Pod Boy is something else. Play dates were "fun" as the parents wondered what the hay to feed him.

For both, I usually have veggies on the plate first then I'm slower to get the other items to them. Their hunger drives them to start working on the veggies. They can't have seconds on anything they like until veggies get done.

We send packed lunches for camp and school. They have lots of friends with one or both parents from abroad (my husband's from Nepal), so lots of kids had "weird" lunches too.

Our oldest has been able to help more in the kitchen and really like to cut the veggies for me. I used to have him cut stuff that didn't need a sharp knife. He's been getting the sharp knife more lately. It helped him engage more. I cooked some yummy Nepali-style cooked veggies while we were camping recently (think healthful Indian) and he actually ate a large amount. Normally any cooked veggie grosses him out. The younger one is getting used to eat lettuce leaves plain like his brother. Normally he needed some kind of sauce. (He's like me while my older son is really like his dad).


usam
08-11-2011, 10:22 AM
I have a five year old and a three year old. I usually give them their veggies around 3 or 4pm as a snack. I cut up cucumbers, carrots, celery , red peppers, brocolli and they can have ranch to dip or hummus. They generally don't eat salads but they eat cut up veggies. At meal times I don't push them to eat their veggies cause they do eat them but not every night. Last night for example we had pasta and a side dish of steamed veggies. My 3 year old ate them all but my five year old just ate her lima beans. Oh, well. I don't fuss about it cause I know she eats veggies but she just didn't feel like them last night. I kind of feel that we as adults don't always feel like eating certain things every day and they are human too, they have their own little opinion.
You could also try adding carrots and zucchini to your meatloaf or add mixed veggies to rice. I simply sautee onions add the bag of mixed veggies and let them defrost. Then I add rice and a veggie boullion and thats their lunch. Veggie burgers and so good, you could cut them up or serve them with a bun. Try offering other colors too, they don't have to be green. Like cauliflower, peppers, grape tomatos etc. Hope this helps, if you need anything let me know. I'm a vegetarian so I have loads or veggie recipes.

April Snow
08-11-2011, 03:43 PM
with my 7 year old, it turned out that he didn't really like most raw veggies, so now I'll lightly steam and then blanch things like broccoli or carrots and then refrigerate so he can have them cold and dip them in ranch, etc. He loves them that way - it's been kind of sad to see him get all excited about a big veggie tray at a party and take a piece of broccoli but then not like it when it was raw.

also, when he was younger, I tried to not stress too much about it. His ped. said that it's very common for kids to not like the taste of veggies but they grow into it if you keep offering them, plus my son has always been a big fruit eater so he was still getting a lot of fresh foods that way.

tommy
08-11-2011, 07:12 PM
I also treated veggies and fruit on the same plain - if a bowl of cantaloupe was going to be consumed at dinner - cool. A bowl of blueberries as your afternoon snack - hey I am not gonna stress about veggies with dinner. Coming from an eating disorder background I was ****-bent on not forcing any eating. Coleslaw seemed to be enjoyed by all the kids- I make my own and include cucumber and apple - a great cruciferous vegetable. Lettuce wraps with a darker lettuce like red leaf (more vitamins) were popular. Carrots with Ranch or some other dip were often enjoyed. My son did not really enjoy cooked vegetables except broccoli-beef stir fry so that was in the rotation. I think flexibility and a lack of pressure is the key. So often their tastes change on a dime.

YogaMomma
08-12-2011, 11:17 AM
My oldest son has extreme sensory sensitivities. He will vomit if forced to eat something that feel or tastes "off" to him. We've had to get very creative to get him to eat a well balanced diet!

You can make your own veggie-filled marinara sauce with a few cans of tomato paste, a mix of veggies like carrots, celery, broccolli, etc., and a juicer. I juice the veggies, add the tomato paste, and then season it and let it simmer for a while. Very sneaky! The kids love this, but I don't let them see what I'm putting in their beloved spaghetti sauce, or they probably wouldn't touch it.

We do a lot of fruit. He seems to tolerate it a lot better. I also keep a lot of the veggies that I know he will eat - which is basically just peas at the moment. I praise the death out of him for trying something new or eating all his veggies. He takes a multivitamin every day as well, just to make sure he's getting everything he needs.

fitmom
08-12-2011, 11:43 AM
I have two sons, ages 9 and 6. The nine-year old eats anything that I put in front of him - no problem there. My younger boy is a bit picky, lol. I basically tell him that he has to eat a few bites (I give him one or two tablespoons compared to me and his older brother) and if he wants dessert (I know it's bribery, lol) then he has to eat them. Now it's getting a little easier as he's gotten older - he'll eat corn, spinach, carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, sweet potatoes, green beans and cucumbers. He loves, loves, loves fruit. Not much of a salad eater yet but there's still time. Just started eating chicken soup. There's always gonna be some issue I'm learning.

Esofia
08-12-2011, 12:12 PM
My friend's six year old daughter refuses to eat vegetables. However, she hasn't yet realised that fresh peas in the pod are vegetables, and will happily shell them and nosh away. Her four year old brother, on the other hand, shells the peas and puts them out in neat little patterns but doesn't eat them, so that they have to get him to stop!

gardenermom
08-12-2011, 12:13 PM
My kids are 7, 5 and 1. My 7 and 5 year olds will both eat a good variety of fruits and veggies (some veggies they prefer raw, some cooked), BUT, they will eat very few things that are mixed or in a sauce. They will eat plain pasta with veggies on the side, but if i mix the veggies into the pasta then they just won't eat it. Definitely no tomato-based pasta sauce. Argh! It drives me crazy. They are BOTH like this with most "mixed" foods - to the extreme that they will not even eat a sandwich (bread and filling separate, please).

I don't want to create a lot of pressure about eating (as tommy says above, I am concerned about creating eating issues), BUT at the same time I don't want to cater to this degree of fussiness. Every day is an attempt to get them to eat more "mixed" foods, and every day is a compromise. We make occassional progress - I make my own mac-and-cheese and they like that, they sort-of accept rice mixed with certain veggies, and my 5-yr old will eat pizza (7-yr old will only eat the crust!). I was similarly fussy as a child, and I grew out of it eventually, so I assume they will too - one day. Thankfully my 1-yr old is at the delightful stage of eating almost everything!

astrophe
08-12-2011, 12:28 PM
When DD was a toddler I made her baby food. Gently steamed and then blended mild veggies with apple or pear. Over time, less of the fruit and more of the veg. Then just the veg and no blending.

Now it's a question of keep offering even if they go through phases of not liking it. You have to offer a kid something a lot of times to be sure.

I know from my spouse that texture matters. He'll eat raw apple all day long but not cooked ones. He objects to anything "squishy."

For child...Sweet ones like carrot, tomato, sugar snap peas, bell pepper or mild ones like green bean, zucchinni, romaine, cucumber, green pepper are always easy. So are "baby" veg. Well rinsed, drained beans like kidney or garbanzo are finger food snacks.

Bolder ones like broccoli or asparagus -- best to get it fresh as possible so it is still sweet. Then not to overcook.

It helps to let her make the salad or prep the veg where possible -- she's invested in it then and more likely to want it.

Also smoothies. Lots of ideas here:

http://www.amazon.com/Big-Book-Juices-Natural-Vitality/dp/1844839737/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1313162662&sr=8-2

Last, she always has to take at least one bite and explain to be in detail what it is she objects to. The taste, the shape, how it is cooked etc. Then I'm willing to let it go and trade out that veggie for a small can of V8.

She just happens to like low sodium v8 -- I do not know why. So swapping out the veg for a v8 works when she tries something and it turns out not to work.

Sometimes I think the problem isn't so much the VEGGIE as it is the OTHER food. She doesn't get desserts at home or too much juice or sugary drinks. Fruit is about it. The sweetness in veg is often subtle -- and you aren't going to appreciate if getting a lot a sugar elsewhere. My own palate knows this... it isn't just kids.

She does like celestial seasonings lemon zinger, raspberry zinger, etc. I make it plain and iced so it looks like koolaid and pretty but isn't sugared up. We like the Honest Tea or Honest Kids pouches too because they are lower sugar in lunchboxes.

A.

April Snow
08-12-2011, 05:24 PM
My kids are 7, 5 and 1. My 7 and 5 year olds will both eat a good variety of fruits and veggies (some veggies they prefer raw, some cooked), BUT, they will eat very few things that are mixed or in a sauce. They will eat plain pasta with veggies on the side, but if i mix the veggies into the pasta then they just won't eat it. Definitely no tomato-based pasta sauce. Argh! It drives me crazy. They are BOTH like this with most "mixed" foods - to the extreme that they will not even eat a sandwich (bread and filling separate, please).

ha, my son is like this too - even with hamburgers, he will pick up the meat and eat that, and then ocassionally, he might eat a few bites of the bun after he'd done with the meat! lol!

also the same with not liking to mix things together - he loves strawberries and cottage cheese but they have to be in 2 separate bowls! lol!

It can be a little bit of a pain but I was (and still am to some extent) a VERY picky eater, and have my own issues about not mixing certain foods. So at
7, he is so much better than I was at that age, I'm very happy to go along with these issues and keep him eating a reasonable variety of healthy foods.

hpnodat
08-16-2011, 11:47 AM
We have never given our daughter the option to refuse. Since she was a baby she's eaten all kinds of fruits & veggies. We never force fed her anything but we've taught her sometimes you just have to do things you don't like, including eating veggies you don't like. Of course it helps that she actually likes them. ;)

PhatBeth
09-12-2011, 06:52 AM
Perhaps the most important factor to consider is your own attitude and approach toward eating in general.

Avoid forcing your children to eat vegetables – or any other food for that matter. Encourage children to try a spoonful, but don’t get upset if they refuse it. Eventually, they will try it, so keep reintroducing various foods from time to time.

stan255
01-08-2012, 03:04 PM
Finely chopped the vegetables and mix it with a bit of meat and sauces and they will definitely eat it

EmilyLarnder
04-30-2012, 06:55 PM
When I was little, I had to eat my veggies before I got to eat anything else.

amandie
05-04-2012, 02:25 PM
No kids yet but I plan to hide it in their food if necessary like homemade spaghetti/pasta sauce, cauliflower alfredo sauce (seriously delicious!), cauliflower potatoes, etc. It's what I did with an ex of mine who did not like vegetables at all, LOL.

MsWxyz
05-20-2012, 03:31 PM
you really need to start them with veggies before sweets i know that is not always so easy , my oldest( now 13) was 5 yrs old before he know frozen yogurt was not ice cream, my middle son( now 10) is a fruit and veggie machine and my youngest ( now 8) is convinced choc -chip cookies are a meal . but you just have to start young . for me no matter if i eat all veggies i can not seem to loose much at all my boys skinny as rails . since my 2nd hysterectomy ( 1 partial & 1 full ) i have just gained and gained and gained more weight and haf the time i really do not eat .

ValRock
05-20-2012, 10:00 PM
I started my kids on veggies first, when they were babies. I don't know if that's the reason, but they love them now.

I usually serve a veggie tray while they're waiting for dinner to be ready and they munch on that. Sometimes I'll steam some and put them on the table too. I don't mind so much if they get full on veggies and pick at their dinner. I do mind if they get full on sweets and pick at their veggies ;), so veggies come first.

Munchy
05-22-2012, 12:45 PM
I make everything with about 50% veggies. You can put pureed veggies in soup, tomato sauce, cheese sauce, and you can shred them in others. I do 50:50 shredded yellow squash with ground chicken, one egg, bread it with a mixture of panko and whole wheat crumbs, and bake. I freeze the nuggets on a tray and then put them in baggies in the freezer. I do the same with turkey and zucchini and make meatballs.

Like other moms, I serve hummus, cheese sauce (I blend 50% cauliflower into mine), or ranch dressing (http://www.skinnytaste.com/2011/09/low-fat-buttermilk-ranch-dressing.html) for dipping.

My daughter loves baked potatoes, so if you mash steamed cauliflower into it, it's undetectable. Roasted broccoli or cauliflower and grape tomatoes are other favorites along with corn and peas (of course).

I make her try new veggies all the time. If she doesn't like it, so what - it's all about one bite at a time. :)

Munchy
05-22-2012, 12:52 PM
I almost forgot - spinach and broccoli "nuggets" are great, especially if you make them into shapes they like. Dr. Praeger makes some, but they're easy to make on your own (http://weeklybite.com/veggie-nuggets-for-kids/) - you can use fun cookie cutters to make them into stars, hearts, dinosaurs or whatever!

You can make other veggies into "fries" (http://allrecipes.com/recipe/crispy-turnip-fries/) and they're a hit.

beccawhite90
06-22-2012, 12:26 PM
i'm very lucky my son loves cucumbers and broccoli, he actually requests it (he's 8)

amandie
06-22-2012, 10:47 PM
I almost forgot - spinach and broccoli "nuggets" are great, especially if you make them into shapes they like. Dr. Praeger makes some, but they're easy to make on your own (http://weeklybite.com/veggie-nuggets-for-kids/) - you can use fun cookie cutters to make them into stars, hearts, dinosaurs or whatever!

You can make other veggies into "fries" (http://allrecipes.com/recipe/crispy-turnip-fries/) and they're a hit.

Veggie nuggets looks freakin' delicious! What an awesome idea. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

Also, you say you blend 50% cauliflower in your cheese sauce... How does that affect the texture? I'd love to try that. Do you have a recipe you could share?

kurisitaru
06-22-2012, 10:55 PM
I don't know if this was said..

but get them to grow their own. That's how my mother got my sister addicted to carrots. Because she got her to grow some, and then she wanted to EAT and EAT and EAT because they were 100% her making. Then she kind of grew fond of them

juliana77
06-22-2012, 11:30 PM
Ranch dressing to dip things in - helps a lot. He will eat sweet veggies like snap peas and carrots plain. He loves salad which has always surprised me!

Our rule has always been that you have to eat the same number of bites of each food as your age. So when he was 4, he had to eat 4 bites. I wouldn't purposely serve him something he truly hated, but he always had to try the bites. And re-trying foods after a few months is good too. "Taste buds change."

Munchy
06-25-2012, 10:57 AM
Veggie nuggets looks freakin' delicious! What an awesome idea. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

Also, you say you blend 50% cauliflower in your cheese sauce... How does that affect the texture? I'd love to try that. Do you have a recipe you could share?

The texture changes slightly, but not enough to bother me or my daughter. Just steam a head of cauliflower, puree it in a food processor, and mix it into your cheese sauce. this is a great link (http://www.parenthacks.com/2010/01/homemade-macaroni-and-cheese-hack-add-cauliflower-puree.html) though I always make my mac and cheese in different ways every time. Lately I've been making the "miracle mac and cheese (http://budgetbytes.blogspot.com/2012/06/miracle-mac-n-cheese-342-recipe-086.html)" with skim or 1% milk, then instead of adding more milk in the end, add the cauliflower puree instead. It has no butter or flour, but it comes out super creamy. I make sure to use extra sharp cheese and to season the milk with salt/pepper/garlic powder (or adobo). I skipped that the first time and it came out bland.

tommy
06-25-2012, 07:10 PM
Lately I've been making the "miracle mac and cheese (http://budgetbytes.blogspot.com/2012/06/miracle-mac-n-cheese-342-recipe-086.html)" with skim or 1% milk, then instead of adding more milk in the end, add the cauliflower puree instead. It has no butter or flour, but it comes out super creamy.

That sounds like a great method. I wonder though if the calories might be skewed a bit since the starch from the pasta that normally gets tossed remains in the dish. Maybe not all that much but maybe someone has an idea? I hate to fool myself about calories counts.

Munchy
06-25-2012, 08:30 PM
I'm not sure. Honestly I never count calories for her (she's 4!) but if you just count it normally with skim and full fat cheese, it's 398 cals for 1/4 of the recipe or 265 for 1/6. It's pretty rich so I'd opt for no more than 1/8 at just under 200 cals. :)

astrophe
06-25-2012, 11:04 PM
Growing some of their food does help. My kid loves gardening. She eats those grape tomatoes off the vine like candy.

I remember another old thing I used to do -- use a veggie peepler to cut it into ribbons or grater to grate it. Sometimes they don't like the cooked taste, but the raw is too "hard" for little teeth still if just "sticks" even if they like raw taste better.

A.

amandie
06-27-2012, 01:06 AM
The texture changes slightly, but not enough to bother me or my daughter. Just steam a head of cauliflower, puree it in a food processor, and mix it into your cheese sauce. this is a great link (http://www.parenthacks.com/2010/01/homemade-macaroni-and-cheese-hack-add-cauliflower-puree.html) though I always make my mac and cheese in different ways every time. Lately I've been making the "miracle mac and cheese (http://budgetbytes.blogspot.com/2012/06/miracle-mac-n-cheese-342-recipe-086.html)" with skim or 1% milk, then instead of adding more milk in the end, add the cauliflower puree instead. It has no butter or flour, but it comes out super creamy. I make sure to use extra sharp cheese and to season the milk with salt/pepper/garlic powder (or adobo). I skipped that the first time and it came out bland.

Oh, thank you so much for posting both links! I just realized that I kinda do the same thing for "alfredo" sauce (http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/weight-watchers/221686-cauliflower-alfredo-sauce-yum.html). I just didn't think of using different cheeses and switching out the types of pasta, heh!

sheramama
06-27-2012, 01:28 AM
My son was a veggie hater. My daughter told him.broccoli.were.little trees. I let him dip carrots into anything. Then when in doubt I sneak gerber pureed squash into anything with tomato sauce or.mac and cheese. It tastes a little.different so I call it mommy magic. He.loves it. Jessica Seinfeld has a good.book out too called Deceptively Delicious. It is how to hide veggies with recipes.

peasandcarrots
05-02-2013, 10:39 PM
Ranch is your best friend. srsly.

My kids are pretty good about veggies. They are super meat eaters, though. I try to cook just enough of the stuff they get plenty that everyone gets a serving of it, and any left overs go into Daddy's lunch box. That way, if they're still hungry, they are taking seconds on veggies.

When my middle guy was a toddler he did not like lettuce. I swear I found a way to incorporate it into every dinner until he ate it. We had taco salad five times in two weeks. lol. He's great, now.

A favorite around here is green cheese lasagna. I mix around 20-30 oz thawed frozen fine chopped spinach with the 15oz of ricotta. No meat, just pasta sauce, oven ready noodles, green cheese(with an egg or two), and cheese. Last time I put mushrooms in it, too. My kids did protest a bit this last round, but only because they finally figured out the green wasn't food color.

Lecomtes
05-02-2013, 11:08 PM
I have a multi-pronged approach to feeding my twiblings veggies (they are 2 and 3)...
1) Education-We frequent the farmers market and let THEM pick their own veggies, they learn the difference between veggies and fruit, the names of different produce, and they get to know the people who produce our food. This way they feel excited about eating "their" selection that "farmer ty" grew for us! :) They also seem more inclined to sample veggie they helped grow. Last season we grew purple skinned tomatoes, and while they sometimes balk at store bought reds, they gobbled up the purple kind!

2) Crouching carrot, hidden cauliflower- Every meal, we offer veggies in plain view. Raw or cooked carrots, cauliflower, greens, whatever...these are frequently left only partially nibbled (or totally ignored in my sons case)...BUT I also add pureed or chopped veggies to pretty much everything, or make things that are veggies disguised as kid faves. Think Mac n' cheese with pureed squash, eggplant "nuggets", grated yellow zucchini in scrambled eggs. They always eat the hidden veggies at least. :)
3) Offer, don't force- I TOTALLY get that it gets frustrating to repeatedly offer veggies that get pushed aside, and they aren't cheap so it's especially irksome when they end up on the floor! However, having been forced to eat things as a child, I really believe repeated offering is the best strategy, not forcing.
GOOD LUCK LADIES! Lots of wonderful ideas, I enjoyed reading through them. May all our children eat veggies! :)

shcirerf
05-05-2013, 12:26 AM
Thankfully my kids were not to fussy.:D

My DH on the other hand! The only veggies he would eat for years was green beans or corn. He's much better now. He actually tried a brussel sprout the other night. Only took 36 years! Said it wasn't too bad! Of course he didn't like steak when we got married, because the only way his mom ever cooked it was fried, until it was tougher than old shoe leather.

Anyway, I remember when I was a kid and my Mom wanted me to eat things I didn't like. I hated that. A lot of the time, it wasn't so much the taste as it was the texture.

For example, (not veg I know, I liked veggies), as a kid, potato salad and macaroni salad and cole slaw made me gag! Potato/macaroni salad, as a kid, I liked the the individual components, just not all mixed up! Slaw was just weird. The veggie I did not like as a kid was cooked peas. When you stick a fork in them and they squish out all over, could not stand the visual! Looked like an icky green worm!:dizzy:

One thing Mom tried to get me to eat, that I downright refused, and starved was headcheese. It's some gelatinous goo made from the leftovers after home butchering a pig.

Anyway, lots of great suggestions. Creativity, sneak it in, in casseroles and sauces. Ask them why, is it taste, texture, looks? (smooshy peas)

One thing I did when my boys were little and starting to teethe was give them frozen peas and carrots to snack on. I would just give them to them loose on the high chair tray, or sit them down with a small bowl. The cold felt good on the mouth, and they got to do some hand/eye/eating coordination in the process.;)

Thankfully, as we grow up our tastes do change, I like tater/macaroni salad now. I will eat slaw, but only my recipe.

Keep offering it, try at least one bite, be creative, have patience.:hug:

LucreziaBorgia
07-10-2013, 01:23 PM
I think by making veggies look "cute", you might have a shot.

Rhiko
07-13-2013, 01:00 PM
I read somewhere that putting sparkles on everything works a treat (pun intended!). I don't have kids but from my own experiences as a fussy eater, I had a select few that I would eat: peas and carrots. It wasn't until I left home and decided to be adventurous that I started eating a variety (my mother recently commented that she was shocked I was eating mushrooms!).

I can only suggest that you try finding vegetables that they like the flavour of, then try finding more with a similar taste. If they are fussy, it's going to be a battle of wills and you just need to be patient and persistent :)

results not typical
09-14-2013, 11:23 PM
We made sure the boys saw US eat vegetables all the time, and just set the platter on the table, after awhile, they served themselves some without being nagged to "eat it!"....but they were close to 5 yrs. old before they did that. As they grew, they tended to like salad better than anything cooked or steamed. When you think about it, vegetable non eating seems to be the norm for most kids, because, let's face it, the veggies aren't really the best tasting things in the world, unless you add fatty stuff to them. So you learn to compromise.........it's just the way it is. Nagging never worked on anyone, usually gets you the opposite result.

Teeni
09-21-2013, 06:24 PM
I wanted my son to be open to eating everything especially vegetables. So I made sure from the time he started eating solids to give him different veggies and fruits even if I have never had them before or even liked them. I also started trying baby lead weaning, which he just flourished with. When I started my diet I started trying new things with him. Now I got the exact opposite problem you have. He refuses to eat his meat and will insist on picking out and eating all his veggies. Lets just say there has been an increased frequency of diaper "blow outs". So now I only give him meat first. Once he has eaten enough to satisfy me he gets his veggies. I wont even let him see them or he will cry and throw his meat on the floor. He is usually hungry so when he thinks all he is getting is what is on his plate he'll eat his meat. All I can suggest is give him his veggies first as others suggested. Now that I think of it I have found protein alternatives that I mix into his veggies to help make sure he gets enough (ex. Quinoa). Perhaps as other suggest you can mix in veggies so he can't tell they are there or add other alternatives with similar nutrients into his food.

mace508
10-01-2013, 03:37 PM
As someone said above, I also serve my daughter in "courses" and we always start out with veggies. She is 5, and getting pickier by the day, lol. The ones she likes best are the "fun" ones that are finger food, like baby carrots and, her all-time favorite, a bowl of cherry or grape tomatoes and some black olives throw in. She will then put a black olive on the end of each of her fingers. :) I realize this is not teaching her that playing with one's food is not appropriate, but at least she's eating them. :)

Munchy
10-02-2013, 10:14 AM
Out of nowhere last week I devised a five page chart of veggies with a column for a checkmark, a picture of a veggie, the veggie name, and a smiley face without a mouth. My just turned six year old is having a blast picking which vegetable to try next, and how to rate it (with a smile, straight face, or frown).

She has always been a good eater, but I wanted to advance past her regular vegetables: zucchini, summer squash, cauliflower, broccoli, green peppers, carrots, corn, and tomatoes. I posted this earlier, but I naturally mix vegetables into nearly every dish I make.

This week she ate onions, peppers, and okra and told me it was delicious (okra got a special smiley) and tonight we have mushrooms, tofu - not on the list but a newbie for her, scallion, and snow peas.

Tomorrow we're having braised bok choy. She's just excited to have a part in planning and picking exactly what to try next, and I'm not stopping her! Her next choice is acorn squash, but I told her she needs to wait for the weather to get colder :)