Weight Loss Support - SO DISHEARTENED i tried so hard




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lucky8
07-12-2011, 05:45 PM
Argh i could scream or cry or both.

This week i have tried so hard and even joined a gym.
I do weightwatchers and have tracked everything to a t and stayed within my points. And worked out 5times
This week Ive done two 30 mins tae bo dvds and had 3 sessions in the gym which consists on 40mins cardio and 30mins weights and i go to my weightwatchers meeting tonight and geuss what???????????? 0.5lb gain :mad: im so upset and angry. :?: bad times


KittyKat1465
07-12-2011, 05:48 PM
It could very possible be that you have gained muscle from all the working out, which as you know weighs more than fat. Don't just go by what the scale says. How do your clothes feel? Rings any loser? Just keep doing what you're doing and you will definitely see progress!

lucky8
07-12-2011, 05:50 PM
Yeah my partner says the same think its just when you try sooo hard.
I hope i see progress soon i think if i see my shape change and the scales arnt moving i wont feel so bad :)


Porthardygurl
07-12-2011, 05:52 PM
Dude..no worries..your up the scale from the change in exercise program..your body is retaining water...give it time...it will go down again..your body just needs to get used to the exercise...

zoodoo613
07-12-2011, 05:53 PM
You will see progress soon. Also, sore muscles hold water. If you've just started all that activity, and are only up .5 lbs, chances are you'll see a big whoosh down the road when you let go of that water weight. Focus on what you're doing, not what the scale says.

lucky8
07-12-2011, 05:55 PM
thanks everyone feel much better :)

DCchick
07-12-2011, 05:58 PM
youre really pretty!! good luck!

Lovely
07-12-2011, 06:06 PM
The scale isn't always our friend. And it DEFINITELY doesn't give the whole story.

You are doing so many healthy things for yourself. Exercising is an achievement in and of itself! Regardless of what the scale says!

You keep to plan, and you'll eventually see a change on the scale :yes: KEEP AT IT KEEP AT IT KEEP AT IT!

berryblondeboys
07-12-2011, 06:11 PM
Remember the scale is just one tool and as you go along with this lifestyle change you will start to see your body's patterns. Most of us have them. Some people gain water weight from doing exercise/weight training, especially. Others don't. Some people hold weight during TTOM, others do not. Some people hold around ovulation, others do not and so on. What we do know, is that if you eat consistently 500 calories deficit, you will see weight loss. It just won't be a nice straight line - more like a roller coaster ride with dips and whooshes and flat parts.

kaplods
07-12-2011, 06:16 PM
Yeah my partner says the same think its just when you try sooo hard.


You can only be disappointed when you have expectations that exceed the reality.

If you expect one week of work to pay off immediately on the scale, you will often be disappointed.

Say you go to work for someone and don't know how paydays work. You think you're going to get paid at the end of the day - only you don't. You work two more days, still no money. You're starting to get sick of this. Do you quit? Or do you ask your boss when you're going to get paid?

It's not the best example, because there is no "set" payment for your work with weight loss. It's more like opening your own business, and hoping that your work pays off, and constantly adjusting your work to get better and better results.

Say you open a shop selling cute handmade items you've made. You invest a lot of money and effort into the items you're going to sell and in opening this shop. You expect for the shop to pay for itself (get you your investment back) in the first week. Only you don't make any money the first week. After a month, you've only had five visitors and none of them bought anything. Now you get the light bill for the shop - you're further behind. Do you close up shop because your plan didn't work?

To judge whether your plan is working or not, you need to find out what is normal for your kind of business. Do you know what the normal results are for weight loss (I would guess not, I didn't).

I always was upset when I got on the scale and didn't see it move, or saw it move in the wrong direction - but only because I thought I was supposed to be (after all everyone else is).

I finally realized it was my expectations were wrong. I was wrong to get upset over the normal things (after all, if I felt like I was failing when I was succeeding, how was I going to get through the tough spots when I actually did make mistakes).

It started with my doctor basically telling me I was full of crap when I complained that I should be losing a lot more than the pitiful 1 lb a month I was losing (I'd lost a total of 30 or 40 pounds by then I believe). I said, "at my size I should be losing a lot more, like normal people."

And instead of saying "Damned right you should be losing more," (like all other doctors had told me in the past," he essentially said "bull poo where'd you get that dumb idea - Normal is giving up and gaining it all back. Just keeping the weight off puts you in the above normal category - you're at the head of this race, not the tail end.

Wow, I was at the head of the race just by staying in it, because "most people" give up.

Another thing I learned about "most people" is that most people don't go an entire month without a gain. In my TOPS (taking off pounds sensibly) group, we have a very diverse groups. A lot of people with a lot of weight to lose, a lot of people with very little to lose, and a few people at their goal weight or within a couple pounds of it (a person at goal weight is called a KOPS member, meaning keeping off pounds sensibly).

We have a monthly contest in which those who have not gained during any of the weekly weigh-ins and haven't missed a meeting (most people don't miss) split a $10 prize. Out of 25 members, there's only 1-3 people at the end of the month who haven't ever experienced a gain at weigh-in.

That means more than 90% of our members have at least one gain per month. And these aren't slackers. Our chapter has won awards for best losses on average per member (because every month they tally how many pounds lost, and how many pounds gained).

Also by averaging the weight loss per member, I can tell you that the average person loses far, far less than 1 lb per week.


So why are you so upset - because you're doing so much better than the average, or because you didn't know what the average truly was.

For me, it was that I didn't know that I was at the head of the pack. I thought I was trailing far, far behind (after all it took me 6 years to lose 91 lbs). And even so, I'm at the head of the pack, because most people give up and regain it all.

Just losing the 11 pounds you have, puts you at the head of the pack (and if you did it in in less than a year, there aren't that many folks in front of you), and you stay in the lead by staing in the race, not by losing every week - not by losing a lot every week (or losing at all in a week. Just a pound a month, puts you in the top 5%).

Know that you're succeeding, because if you think you're failing (even when you're doing better than 95% of folks) you're going to give up.

If I had known how rare success was. If I had known that even 1/4 lb a week was an achievement most people don't make and keep - I don't think I would have given up. Every time I gave up in the past, it was because I thought there was something wrong with me - that everyone else was doing so much better and having it so much easier. I was so dead wrong. Maybe if I knew that I would have felt like the success I was, instead of the failure I thought I was.

fattymcfatty
07-12-2011, 06:21 PM
I'm a daily weigher, and my weight always fluctuates 1 to 2lbs depending on if I ate a little too much sodium the night before, or lifted weights (especially if I increase weight or do new moves--the muscles retain water to repair). I also tend to increase at different times in my cycle and also if I eat a more carb heavy diet the night before, regardless on if I eat the same calories.

I've currently been trying to drop out of the 190's for 4 months. Yep, 4 months. But I tell you, my body looks different and my clothes fit differently than 4 months ago, although the scale has only moved down 9 lbs.

Keep at it!!!

Lovely
07-12-2011, 06:47 PM
Normal is giving up and gaining it all back. Just keeping the weight off puts you in the above normal category - you're at the head of this race, not the tail end.

Sometimes I just want to take things said on 3FC and tattoo them onto my forearms. I'd run out of skin really fast with how many truthful things are quoted, but it doesn't take away the feeling!

kaplods
07-12-2011, 10:57 PM
Sometimes I just want to take things said on 3FC and tattoo them onto my forearms. I'd run out of skin really fast with how many truthful things are quoted, but it doesn't take away the feeling!


That's because we've been brainwashed to believe things we know aren't true. It's how our culture "does" weight loss. We have to unlearn years and years of indoctrination.

Humans are social creatures. To some degree we follow the herd, even when we know the herd is heading towards a steep cliff. Even to save our life, it's very hard to be the black sheep and choose not to jump off the cliff along with everyone else.

Learning a "new" way to think is really difficult. Even knowing truth doesn't help until you believe it as well as know it.

I learned the facts of weight loss very early, but it took me 40 years before I started believing any of it, and acting in accordance with my beliefs.

I've known it was silly to get discouraged by the scale by the time I was 8 years old, but I got discouraged anyway because that's what I saw everyone else doing.

No matter who you are, "do as I say, not as I do," is a horrible way to teach anyone to do anything except doing one thing and saying another.

shcirerf
07-13-2011, 01:53 AM
I agree with all of the above posters.

Patience and tracking are key. Don't give up. Continue to stick with it. YOu are going to have good days and bad days, and good weigh ins and not so good.


The key is hanging in there. Use your tracker/journal as a tool to help you. It's not just about tracking food and exercise, but also has a spot for thoughts.

There are so many variables to this journey, I encourage you to make a 6 month commitment, and use all the tools available, and then see where you are.

I am a WW member and I love the program. However I had to tweak it a bit so that it would work for me.

For instance, I'm up a bit, down a bit, (.5 or so a week) and then after a few weeks I'll lose 2 or 3 lbs.

Go figure!

Give it all a chance!

nomadiclee
07-13-2011, 02:41 AM
When the scale is being a jerk, I find it's really encouraging to remind myself that, even if the scale isn't showing it, I'm making much healthier choices in terms of food and exercise than I was at my highest weight. And in the long run that's far more important than the numbers on the scale. Also, a .5 weight gain is nothing to get too upset about because, as someone mentioned, that could be part of normal fluctuations during the day.
So just keep at it and eventually the scale will figure out that you're being serious!

droppingit
07-13-2011, 03:05 AM
Argh i could scream or cry or both.

This week i have tried so hard and even joined a gym.
I do weightwatchers and have tracked everything to a t and stayed within my points. And worked out 5times
This week Ive done two 30 mins tae bo dvds and had 3 sessions in the gym which consists on 40mins cardio and 30mins weights and i go to my weightwatchers meeting tonight and geuss what???????????? 0.5lb gain :mad: im so upset and angry. :?: bad times

I could have written your post a few weeks ago.Weight watchers is a very good program. It didn't work well for me though. I'm not sure why I couldn't make it work...it was me...not at all the program's fault.
Look at the section on this site for Ideal Protein. You can follow a similar protocol as that plan( I am not trying to push that particular diet on you) but the menu structure of that diet is really working for me.

lucky8
07-13-2011, 06:45 AM
Thanks so much for your replys im taking everything on board and feel so much better ive got weighed on my scales today and im 3lbs lighter than yesturday so i prob was holding alot of water with working out.
Just gona keep going and try and not worry i know im doing all the right things :)

tricon7
07-13-2011, 05:08 PM
It could very possible be that you have gained muscle from all the working out, which as you know weighs more than fat. Don't just go by what the scale says. How do your clothes feel? Rings any loser? Just keep doing what you're doing and you will definitely see progress!

An adult male only gains from working out about 5 lbs. of muscle per year, and a woman even less, and this is regular lifting. I don't think it's a muscle gain. IMHO, it's either water weight or she has undercounted her calories somewhere - perhaps an uncounted nibble here and nibble there, which adds up. It's soooo easy to do.

ChickieChicks
07-13-2011, 10:17 PM
An adult male only gains from working out about 5 lbs. of muscle per year, and a woman even less, and this is regular lifting. I don't think it's a muscle gain. IMHO, it's either water weight or she has undercounted her calories somewhere - perhaps an uncounted nibble here and nibble there, which adds up. It's soooo easy to do.

Do you have a source for that info? I've never heard anything like that before. I find it hard to believe we can only gain 5 lbs. or less of muscle a year!!!!

lucky8
07-14-2011, 08:33 AM
youre really pretty!! good luck!

aww thanks

lucky8
07-14-2011, 08:35 AM
An adult male only gains from working out about 5 lbs. of muscle per year, and a woman even less, and this is regular lifting. I don't think it's a muscle gain. IMHO, it's either water weight or she has undercounted her calories somewhere - perhaps an uncounted nibble here and nibble there, which adds up. It's soooo easy to do.


This is why i was soo disheartened as i didnt over eat i do weightwatchers and i was accurate all week even my leader went right through my tracker and says i had done everything right :(

But ive came to conclusion half pound is neither here or there and i went to a different meeting so was different scales so they could have been half apound out.
Im over it and concentrating on this week just continuing what im doing :dizzy:

kateleestar
07-14-2011, 08:40 AM
Dude..no worries..your up the scale from the change in exercise program..your body is retaining water...give it time...it will go down again..your body just needs to get used to the exercise...

This here, exactly. :)

When I went from nothing to "running" 5 times a week, I gained too. It's no big, youll be okay! :D

indiblue
07-14-2011, 08:44 AM
Muscle does not weigh more than fat. Muscle is smaller and denser than fat, but it does not weigh more than fat. A pound of fat weighs the same as a pound of muscle. This is a major dietary myth.

Weight gained within a week, or a couple weeks of starting a new exercise routine is not due from increased muscle, but from water retention of sore muscles. (Assuming food consumption has not increased). It is REALLY HARD for women to gain pounds of muscles and it takes HEAVY lifting... not Zumba, yoga, running, ellpitical, etc (all of which I love and there is nothing wrong with any of them).

Sorry. Those are just two of my big pet peeves. And I think it's really important to get the facts on both of them. Most likely you are gaining for reasons others have mentioned- because weight loss doesn't happen overnight, within a day, or sometimes within a week, and because muscles often retain water. But I wanted to counter those two statements though because I don't want you to continue gaining (perhaps if the calorie count was off, etc) and assume it was muscle. If you continue to gain (not a pound from week to week, but pounds over the course of several weeks/month) then it's something to be aware of and not write off to "gaining muscle." Also, some people gain because they eat more when they exercise, but if you are sure from WW you aren't doing that, then you're fine :)

You are probably doing GREAT and that 3 lb loss you just saw is one of many to come. As other said, it takes time. You may see no loss for a week, but keep at it. If you're doing everything right, you will see losses eventually.

And it's awesome that you are working out so much, just remember that weight loss is almost always from diet. So keep up the WW and good luck!! You're doing wonderfully!

lucky8
07-14-2011, 08:48 AM
Muscle does not weigh more than fat. Muscle is smaller and denser than fat, but it does not weigh more than fat. A pound of fat weighs the same as a pound of muscle. This is a major dietary myth.

Weight gained within a week, or a couple weeks of starting a new exercise routine is not due from increased muscle, but from water retention of sore muscles. (Assuming food consumption has not increased). It is REALLY HARD for women to gain pounds of muscles and it takes HEAVY lifting... not Zumba, yoga, running, ellpitical, etc (all of which I love and there is nothing wrong with any of them).

Sorry. Those are just two of my big pet peeves. And I think it's really important to get the facts on both of them. Most likely you are gaining for reasons others have mentioned- because weight loss doesn't happen overnight, within a day, or sometimes within a week, and because muscles often retain water. But I wanted to counter those two statements though because I don't want you to continue gaining (perhaps if the calorie count was off, etc) and assume it was muscle. If you continue to gain (not a pound from week to week, but pounds over the course of several weeks/month) then it's something to be aware of and not write off to "gaining muscle." Also, some people gain because they eat more when they exercise, but if you are sure from WW you aren't doing that, then you're fine :)

You are probably doing GREAT and that 3 lb loss you just saw is one of many to come. As other said, it takes time. You may see no loss for a week, but keep at it. If you're doing everything right, you will see losses eventually.

And it's awesome that you are working out so much, just remember that weight loss is almost always from diet. So keep up the WW and good luck!! You're doing wonderfully!

aww thank you so much means alot that people take the time to give advice and reply to posts thanks for that info i feel much better :carrot:

QuilterInVA
07-14-2011, 11:40 AM
KittyKat, please don't post such misinformation as "muscle weighs more than fat". A pound is a pound. Muscle has less volume than fat pound for pound so her clothes would be looser. Women don't gain muscle easily and a week certainly wouldn't gain any.

Lucky 8, when you first start exercise, you retain water. It will take a week or two for your body to become adjusted. You are doing fine and the scale will eventually catch up to your efforts.

kaplods
07-14-2011, 01:05 PM
Muscles DOES INDEED weigh more than fat - Most people understand that when people say muscle weighs more than fat, they mean per equal volumes. Thus muscle weighs more than fat, because a cubic foot of muscle most definitely, does indeed weigh more than a cubic foot of fat.

Now, if someone says "a pound of muscle weighs more than a pound of fat," they're wrong, because, of course, a pound is a pound.

Also, while muscle does not and cannot turn into fat, some know this but still say "I want to turn this fat into muscle," and what they literally mean is "I want to lose fat and gain muscle."

tricon7
07-14-2011, 01:09 PM
It's like a roller coaster, isn't it? Try and set your sights on the long-term, though. You'll eventually see the changes if you stay the course.

Arianwen
07-14-2011, 01:10 PM
Muscles DOES INDEED weigh more than fat - Most people understand that when people say muscle weighs more than fat, they mean per equal volumes. Thus muscle weighs more than fat, because a cubic foot of muscle most definitely, does indeed weigh more than a cubic foot of fat.

Now, if someone says "a pound of muscle weighs more than a pound of fat," they're wrong, because, of course, a pound is a pound.

Also, while muscle does not turn into fat, some know this but still say "I want to turn muscle into fat," and what they literally mean is "I want to lose fat and gain muscle."

Okie dokie...this could be helpful me, thanks!

tricon7
07-14-2011, 02:33 PM
Do you have a source for that info? I've never heard anything like that before. I find it hard to believe we can only gain 5 lbs. or less of muscle a year!!!!

I was a bodybuilder for years, and that was common knowledge. When you workout a muscle, you're actually tearing it. Then when you eat right and rest it afterward, it builds itself back up to where it was before, except that it's added just a bit more muscle tissue to itself as a result of the tearing. Kind of like scar tissue (though it's not that). As you might imagine from this process, it's going to take a long time to gain pounds of muscle. But what you do gain is quite noticable.

indiblue
07-15-2011, 03:11 AM
Muscles DOES INDEED weigh more than fat - Most people understand that when people say muscle weighs more than fat, they mean per equal volumes. Thus muscle weighs more than fat, because a cubic foot of muscle most definitely, does indeed weigh more than a cubic foot of fat.


The reason why I "corrected' (or at least quibbled with) this claim is that 90% of the time when people say this is that it is used in this context:

Person A: "I am working out an hour a day for 6 days a week and yet I gained 3 lbs this week, what's wrong??"
Person B: "It's because muscle weighs more than fat. You are gaining muscle."
Persona A: "Oh okay, I guess it's okay then." or "Oh I guess I'm bulking up really fast. I should cut back on my exercise"

... when actually the gain is due to a) water retention and/or b) eating more due to increased exercise, whether for psychological, emotional, or physical reasons and/or c) moving less during the day because of exercise, either for psychological ("I worked out today, I don't need to take the stairs") or physical ("I am so tired from my workout.") reasons.

Muscle takes a LONG time to build. It takes a LOT of time to build 3 lbs (or even 1 lb) of muscle. Believing that weight gained is due to building muscles leads to the following misconceptions:
1. I don't need to work out as much because I build muscle quickly.
2. I should stop working out because the 3 lbs I gained is muscle and I don't want to bulk up.
3. The weigh I am gaining is good weight (muscle) so I'm not going to worry about it.

I corrected the statement "muscle weighs more than fat" because it was used in the context of "Don't worry about weight gain, it's because you are gaining muscle." I did not want the OP to
a) assume weight gain was for reasons other than water retention and stop working out/work out less (Misconception #1-2) or
b) actually be accidentally eating more than she should because the weight gain was due to inadvertent increase in calorie consumption (Misconception #3).

I almost always (unsolicited, of course) quibble with posts which claim that "Muscle weighs more than fat" for these reasons. I think it's really important not to fall into these three misconceptions. It often leads to a decrease in strength building exercises and can possibly lead to an inadvertent increase in caloric consumption per day, simply because the weight gain has been ascribed to the wrong reasons.

If this had been a post about someone who was 5'2, 145 lbs, extremely athletic (lifting heavily 3-4x/week with a trainer), but troubled because her BMI was higher than the normal range, it might be appropriate to remind her that because she is carrying more muscle per square inch on her body, and that muscle weighs more than fat, she will be heavier than someone carrying the same volume of fat, but that this does not imply she is overweight. (Sorry for the runon sentence.)

However, since in this case it implied "You are gaining weight after one week of exercise, that is because you are replacing fat with muscle, which weighs more," I felt it was in the OP's (and other readers') best interest to add further explanation to this implication.

gagalu
07-15-2011, 04:33 AM
a .5 gain is water weight lol

do you honestly think it's physically possible that you'd gain a half lb of fat with all the work you've been doing? it's ok. fluctuations happen.

MIMI 193
07-15-2011, 06:46 AM
I find measuring helps..on days when the scale is not my friend lol
a quarter inch here and there cheers me right up ;0)