General chatter - Did you 'make' your child get braces?




ddc
07-01-2011, 11:10 AM
My daughter is almost 12 and we went a couple of weeks ago to an orthodontist for a consult. She is indeed a candidate for braces.
Her top teeth are all crossed and her 'vampire fang' teeth are coming it way up high. Her friends all have braces and tell her that it hurts, so she doesn't want to get them.
I had braces when I was 20. At that point it was my decision because I was an adult. Should I let her decide, even though she's only 12?
I told her that if she waits until she's an adult, she'll be the one having to pay for them - lol.
I didn't even think about her not wanting to do it. I just thought it is what 'we' should do. Should I give her the choice?? :?:

Thanks!


Miss Sandra
07-01-2011, 11:25 AM
I'm not a parent, but I'll give my opinion anyway. I think it's actually a health issue and therefore should be made my the parent. Crossed teeth can be harder to floss and take care of and can potentially lead to gum diseases. I didn't need braces, so I'm not sure about the pain involved.

I'm sure she'll thank you later for it. :)

CrystalZ10
07-01-2011, 11:27 AM
My daughter is almost 12 and we went a couple of weeks ago to an orthodontist for a consult. She is indeed a candidate for braces.
Her top teeth are all crossed and her 'vampire fang' teeth are coming it way up high. Her friends all have braces and tell her that it hurts, so she doesn't want to get them.
I had braces when I was 20. At that point it was my decision because I was an adult. Should I let her decide, even though she's only 12?
I told her that if she waits until she's an adult, she'll be the one having to pay for them - lol.
I didn't even think about her not wanting to do it. I just thought it is what 'we' should do. Should I give her the choice?? :?:

Thanks!

It does hurt, but bad teeth could affect her confidance later on in her teens. We got my stepdaughter braces at 10. Most of her baby teeth were still in and the ones that did come out, were not growing in very fast. Since getting braces, 3 baby teeth have fallen out and are growing in faster.

She has just the top brackets, and later on will get head gear for just nighttime. When all her adult teeth are in, she will get top and bottom brackets in.

It does hurt, when the bands are tightend, but childrens liquid asprin helps with the pain. She was excited to get them because she got to pick colors. She also is more aware of her crooked teeth at an early age and knows that even though it hurts now, later on her teeth will be straight and pretty.

I'd say take care of it now rather than later. One less thing for her to be aware of in her teens.


bargoo
07-01-2011, 11:34 AM
As the parent you should decide. If you let her decide she will be in for even more problems than a little pain. When she is an adult she will want to know why nothing was done about her teeth.

Emme
07-01-2011, 11:45 AM
I had braces at age 12 and my parents just had me do it. I didn't think twice about saying no because I knew it would straighten out my teeth and close up some pretty major gaps. As far as pain, I don't remember them "hurting" so to speak, but I remember the pressure and tightness when they were tightened...but it wasn't so bad that I regretted ever having braces. I think you should have her get them. It's for her oral health as well as her smile! :)

lauralyn
07-01-2011, 11:57 AM
I had my oldest get them both for cosmetic reasons and health. As a parent I made the decision and she was not happy with me but now, nearly 5 years later she is glad I had her get them.

fatgyrl
07-01-2011, 11:57 AM
.... When she is an adult she will want to know why nothing was done about her teeth.

She may even resent you for not making her get them.

I HATE my teeth (probably more than being fat) and always have. I was not "allowed" to get braces (and my Grandma would have paid for them) I was told my oral hygiene was not good enough, but there would have always been an excuse.

I have never been able to afford adult braces and other things have always seemed more important so I have learned to persevere and cringe at pictures.

Dorian5
07-01-2011, 12:28 PM
She may even resent you for not making her get them.

THIS!!! I hate that my mother listened to my temper tantrum when I was a child and had a consultation about getting braces. I was 12 or 13 and I did NOT want to get metal in my mouth, it would totally have made me "un-popular" at the time.

Now, as a 22 year old adult, I wish she had just smacked me around and told me to get them. I'm considering them now since my smile isn't as pretty as I would like and have to do a closed-smile in pictures to feel confident. :(

Zeitgeist
07-01-2011, 12:50 PM
I think one of the most important decisions parents should make is ensuring their child's teeth are maintained. Our culture places a lot of emphasis on teeth and it is an immediate indicator of economic status in our society. Think about it...what is your immediate thought when you meet someone with missing front teeth?

My parents had me (and my sister) in braces at age 8 and they were removed at age 12. Additionally, we went to the dentist every six months, without fail, for cleanings. I hated the braces and I hated being the only one wearing them at such a young age. But when I think back on it, everyone who wore them (regardless of age), complained. They are uncomfortable and make you feel self-conscious; who WOULD like them? But I am eternally grateful now that my teeth are healthy and straight and I've thanked my parents many times for their recognition that oral care was mandatory. Plus, the friends I have whose parents did not consider oral health to be that important, have spent their entire lives battling issues I never have to worry about.

The worst case scenario is that she complains about them now and suffers minor discomfort. What is the worst case scenario if her teeth are not addressed?

FassGal
07-01-2011, 12:56 PM
I think you should make her get them. I would explain the short-term and longterm cosmetic and Health benefits of having straighter aligned teeth and emphasize that having her teeth alignment corrected will improve her health overall (getting braces provides more than cosmetic benefits)! In the end, I think it's your decision to make as the parent, who's in charge of her health right now. Moreover, as some have stated, your daughter may resent you for not making her get them! My mother made my sister get braces after reasoning with her didn't work, and now she is so grateful and cannot stop smiling (by nature, my sis doesn't do perky, but she sure smiles a lot now!). I can think of things my mother made me do, I didn't want to do, but now as an adult I can appreciate her wisdom and I'm so grateful she stood her ground.

BTW, since your daughter is 12, you can probably tell her that she doesn't want to be the girl/woman with the jacked up teeth when it's time for her to date! She better get them now when she's too young and all of the other girls and boys her age has them.

AriesNV
07-01-2011, 12:57 PM
My parents never got me braces due to their finances...so I can't say I resent them for it, but I definitely am bitter about it, because I wish I would have had them. I just had a consultation for some, and since I'm now 25 the orthodontist referred me to a surgeon...

So, get them for your daughter. They hurt when they're being adjusted for a few days, but that's it. The pain inflicted on her ego (and her wallet) when she gets older will be worse. As an adult our teeth can't easily be moved around, and our jaw bones settle as the teeth do...so now, I'd have to have surgery to realign my whole JAW...$$$$$

Lovely
07-01-2011, 12:57 PM
Would you ask your child's permission to get them vaccines? Or if they needed a shot in order to improve their health? This isn't an "up for discussion" issue.

I was 11 when I had braces, and as an adult appreciate how they were fixed early enough that I avoided problems I might have experienced had my parents put it off.

This is not about vanity, after all. This is about the health of her teeth! Dental problems are compounded when teeth aren't fixed.

Side note: Yeah. Braces can make your mouth ache a little. They can sometimes be a little irritating. Not only do you get used to it, but who cares if it's a little pain now when it saves MORE pain down the road?

my2cats
07-01-2011, 04:43 PM
I'm not a parent, but as a kid I wasn't eligible for braces till highschool - later than all my friends. And by that time I wanted them because I was super self-conscious about my teeth.

Once her friends' braces come off and she is the only one with crooked teeth she may be feeling very differently - but if you get them now she can still moan and groan about how evil you are, and also complain with all her friends about how much they hate having braces. And then they can get matching bands for school. :lol:

Yes, they will likely hurt. Right after they're put on and a couple days each time their tightened, it's not pleasant. But it's by no means "unbearable".

I kind of think of it in a similar vein to my mom forcing me to take piano lessons for a couple years (along with various other activities). Some I liked, some I didn't. Overall I'm glad she pushed me to try things out because now I have some interests I wouldn't otherwise, but at the time I often threw fits because I didn't want to do it.

Momentary pain; lifelong straight teeth. Another analogy - if my parents could have put me on a 1-yr treatment for obesity that would have me fit and healthy for the rest of my life, I probably would have whined and screamed then but I'd be sooo glad of it now.

my2cats
07-01-2011, 04:46 PM
One more thing to add :lol:

When I was a kid I was in a car wreck and got a scar on my face. My parents left it up to me if I wanted to go back to the doctor to have the scar reduced cosmetically about a year after the accident. I was afraid of the pain (getting the stitches had really hurt), so I said no.

It doesn't really bother me these days (over time it faded a fair bit too), but when I think about it I wish I had just gone to have it minimized. Seems pretty similar.

kimicat76
07-01-2011, 04:52 PM
i am a parent but he is only 2 1/2. i have needed braces all my life and ill be 26 on the 6th. my two front teeth are pushed in towards each other and my canines are high up in my gums and one is pushed out a lil. my bottom 4 teeth arent that crooked but still bad enough to impact my flossing. they cause me alot of (literal) headaches and my teeth get cavities because there are spaces i cannot get to. i wish i could have had that option when i was her age. i grew up without health insurance and was really poor. the sad part is it appears my son has inherited my teeth. you better believe i would make him get braces. think about it, you are saving her soooo much heartache later in life. shes gonna be begging for them in high school when shes getting ready for senior pics. i hope to get logan braces when hes old enough so he doesnt have to go through what i do.

duckyyellowfeet
07-01-2011, 07:45 PM
I needed braces at 10; actually, I needed a Herbst device AND braces AND then another set of braces. I didn't want any of it. I spent two weeks not being able to eat because the Herbst device was digging into my cheeks. I had to wear a mouth guard to play soccer, it hurt when the wires were changed and I hated how difficult it was to floss.

But I was grateful, even then, that my parents were willing to sink so much money into my teeth. I would have serious dental issues now. Now, my teeth are straight and healthy. Honestly, she is 12 and can't think past the immediate "this will hurt"....and I think that being a parent involves doing what is best for your child in the long-run. She'll get over it.

shasha12
07-01-2011, 07:54 PM
I say get her the braces! DH had the opportunity to get braces in high school, at which point he decided against getting them for social reasons. He’s regretted that decision ever since, and now, as an adult, he has elected to get them. He’s glad he’s getting his teeth fixed, but he hates having to wear them, and he wishes he would have done it as a kid when “everyone else had them too”.

She may put up a fight, but she’ll appreciate it in the future.

mypinkpolkadot
07-01-2011, 08:52 PM
I would definitly have her get them.. She'll thank you in the long run. My parents never could afford to get them for me.. and i wanted them so bad.

Now im 20, and I hate my teeth, and I just don't want to get braces cause im older now.. and fat + braces + glasses.. cute!

Don't think of it as you're making her. It's a medical need in some ways..Just like when she gets shots, she may not like it, but it has to happen.

nelie
07-01-2011, 09:47 PM
It is a health issue. I ended up getting cavities as an adult, my teeth were ground down and then it was realized that these issues were caused by misalignment of my teeth. I got braces in my 30s and wish someone had told me sooner.

Kitsey
07-01-2011, 10:57 PM
I WISH I had had braces! I always say one of the first things I would do if I won the lottery was go out and get braces. I feel horrible about my teeth, the teeth are actually fairly straight (except one odd one on the bottom) but I have an overbite. I so envy people with a beautiful smile!! I almost feel worse about my teeth than I do my weight. I know with dedication I can lose, but I'll never be able to afford a nice smile :(

EZMONEY
07-02-2011, 12:26 AM
I am 57 and back when I grew up there was a stigma attached to braces....we kids all thought the kid that wore braces was a thumb sucker....

we know now that isn't true...

many...MANY kids wear braces these days...I don't think kids even think about it anymore...

the colored bands etc. make it "fun"....

I bought 5 sets of braces....son/daughter/step-d/nephew...and my son again as his mouth took quite a beating on a hit in high school basketball game!

Cost me a fortune....one I was willing to pay...

if you can afford it....do it!!!

effie12
07-02-2011, 02:17 AM
I got braces in 4th grade and got them off in 8th. There was never any discussion, no in put on my part, I simply went to the orthodontist and that was that. I am thankful that my parents had me get braces, despite any pain and moaning on my part, my teeth are straight and although it is probably not at all connected I have never had a cavity. Having a nice set of teeth is just one thing that you can kind of always be confident about. At least in my case, I may be fat, but my teeth sure are great!

I think you'll be doing your daughter a great service by getting her braces now. Later in life, braces and orthodontics seem much more bizarre. As a pre-teen/teen, it is almost the norm. The pain really isn't that bad at all, and I had all kinds of wacky things going on in my mouth for a while there!

ddc
07-05-2011, 12:54 PM
Thanks everyone!

I guess I was thinking more along the lines that she's the one that has to have them in her mouth for 2 years, so should she get a say in whether she gets them or not.

I made an appointment for next Monday ! :)

EZMONEY
07-05-2011, 09:08 PM
....

I made an appointment for next Monday ! :)

Now there's a smart mom! :)

sheramama
07-05-2011, 10:08 PM
My mom made me get braces when I was 14. I got them off right before my 16th bday (13 yrs ago). There were times I hated her for them, but once they were off, it was the best thing ever.

On that note, I have noticed that children are getting them younger and younger and keeping them on longer. Maybe you can wait a yr or 2. I already see how my 7 yr old's front teeth are coming in and I know she'll get the dreaded braces too, just not too young.

Expunge
07-07-2011, 07:59 PM
I never got them - my mom couldn't afford thousands of dollars for something that was, for me, purely cosmetic. I only have some extremely minor crookedness (not visible even when I smile), so it would be been relatively pointless.

I say: if it could reasonably impact the actual HEALTH of her mouth, get them (severe over/underbite and crookedness can do that). If it's purely cosmetic, let her decide at this point.

fattymcfatty
07-07-2011, 08:09 PM
Well, my sister (who blames my parents for everything wrong in her life) had this issue. My Mom took her in for a consult and she was going to have skin grafts and serious procedures in order for her to have braces, so my Mom opted for her not to do it. My sister hated her teeth for years, and paid for braces herself when she was 19 or so and had a job.

I was born with my Dad's straight teeth. Most people are shocked when I tell them that my teeth have never had braces. And guess what? They are full of cavities. Big spaces and all. I brush and floss like crazy, my teeth are rotten. My DH never flosses, he has extra teeth and they are crooked and doesn't have cavities. Freaking ridiculous!!!

Poor parents. We are always darned if we do, darned if we don't. If my daughter inherits my husbands teeth, she'll have them fixed at a young age for the health reasons, and she will not have a choice. His started to bother him a little in his mid-thirties. It was never cosmetic, the part you see when he smiles are straight, and I think that is why his parents opted not to spend the money.

KerriLeah
07-09-2011, 09:31 PM
My daughter just had braces put on last month. She was told several years ago she needed them, but it wasn't in the budget whatsoever, so I made her suck it up and get over it. For the last three years she has pestered me, and I think whined a little more about her overbite being uncomfortable than necessary or true, but she has them now. I sucked it up and will be paying a pretty penny for that smile of hers. They are uncomfortable. The first week, she couldn't eat much that wasn't soft, and she still can't bite down on a burger or sandwich, but six weeks later, you can look at her teeth and already see the difference! She is much more self-confident with a mouth full of metal than she has ever been about her smile. I say do it. I did go to 3 different orthodontist consultations to be sure she did really need them and got the same report 3 times (trust me, I did NOT want to fork the cash over).

Arctic Mama
07-10-2011, 02:49 AM
Sure, they ache a little, but no pain and no gain in cases like this!

I agree with a PP who mentioned that this is one of those parenting decisions 'not up for discussion'. All health issues with badly aligned teeth aside, a healthy mouth and straight smile has huge implications in how one is perceived as an adult, in the job market. A friend of mine has genetically poor teeth and a degenerative jaw disease that caused his teeth to fall out, and despite being handsome and smart, he couldn't find a job better than shipping/package receiving (back end work) for his company, because they didn't want to put him in a job where he had contact with clients. Once he was able to afford dentures he saw significant advancement and was able to get another job with much more ease, the only significant factor that changed was the way his smile looked.

For a girl, especially, self confidence is key, and a crooked smile can really undermine that. If our girls or boys show signs of dental issues or jaw issues, we will deal with it on their behalf, just like a dozen other health decisions. Their preferences will be taken into account on other things, but this is non-negotiable for us.

Brown
07-10-2011, 04:12 AM
I know with dedication I can lose, but I'll never be able to afford a nice smile :( Why do you think you can never afford a nice smile? Money is like weight loss. You make a goal, and you work hard to get there.

I never got them - my mom couldn't afford thousands of dollars for somI say: if it could reasonably impact the actual HEALTH of her mouth, get them (severe over/underbite and crookedness can do that). If it's purely cosmetic, let her decide at this point. Seconded.

I had braces when I was a kid, and then got them again on the lower teeth when I was 19, by choice, because I wasn't satisfied. Nice teeth are very important to me- my own, and the guys' I'm attracted to, whether it's just cosmetic or health.

swtbttrfly23
07-10-2011, 04:32 AM
I also had braces when I was younger, it was never presented to me as a choice, it simply was what my mother wanted us all to get (because we needed them, my youngest sister didn't need them so didn't have to get them), but I am very much glad that I did it when I was younger. I remember some soreness from getting them tightened, and maybe a little bit of general soreness right after I got them done, but I love that now I have a great set of teeth. I've had many an adult friend who has gotten them because they missed it when they were younger, and it always struck me as being harder to deal with as an adult. I was always grateful to have gotten it out of the way during gradeschool, and not in my professional years. If she needs them, have her get them. The pain is nothing too horrible, and I garauntee it will be worthwhile for her in the long run when she has a fantastic smile as an adult :-)

ddc
07-11-2011, 12:02 PM
Just got back from the orthodontist--braces are on !!
Well, the top ones are anyway. Since she was worried about pain, he said she could wait and get the bottom ones in 6 months or so.

Yippee!!

Thanks y'all for your input :)

TheGymNerd
07-13-2011, 04:41 AM
i think what is really sad is the social stigma attached to straight teeth. It
seems that in today's society, unless your teeth are straight you can't be
somebody. Really really sad. I think we should be grateful enough to have
our teeth, floss, and brush. When admitting the need for straighter teeth
is admitting to a much deeper and shallow fact we should face. "I need to
prepare myself or my children (whomever needs straight teeth) to be the
next hollow porcelain evil corporate scam artist. What ever happened to
beauty from the inside? How do children feel when you tell them god made
you the way you are but your teeth aren't straight so here is some pain and
metal to wire you. This idea is similar to calling a young child fat and throwing
them on a treadmill to run until they feel pain. I think this thread really lacked
any input from anyone able to see past the skin. Children should be healthy an
educated at a young age. Once you pressure a child to change physically an unwillingly
it can open the door for other psychological problems down the road. The childhood
is a sensitive time. This whole thread reminds me of an old story. A teacher once told
a child to draw a picture of a elephant. So the child drew a picture of an elephant. The
elephant was not gray though, the child decided to color it purple. The teacher told the
child that he or she is wrong and elephants are gray.

So is this the message we want in our culture, "oh he or she isn't good enough, their
teeth aren't straight." You can pay someone $ to fix teeth so no problem. But you
cant pay someone to shed 100's of pounds of fat off ones body so this is seen
as a more sensitive issue. If one could hand over 1000$ and lose 100lbs to
look just like models in a magazine with tight skin, then
it would be ok to be shallow about being over weight. I see this thread
as a deep issue, that not one single person besides myself thought more about than
the pretty empty smiles they see when they click of facebook right next to a can of beer.
I think if i found myself on my death bed thinking about braces, or anyone thinking
about braces while reflecting on life, it is doomsday for the world. And after
reading this thread, i feel like doomsday is closer than ever.

Zeitgeist
07-13-2011, 06:38 AM
I respectfully disagree.

"I need to prepare myself or my children (whomever needs straight teeth) to be the next hollow porcelain evil corporate scam artist.”

So healthy teeth equate shallowness and criminality to you?

Oral care is like any other health care we provide for our children. If a child is born with other physical deformities, do you also question parents who do what they can to fix them? Or does attempting to provide leg braces, for example, to allow a child to walk normally equate with conformity and criminality to you as well? I think you are not seeing beyond the notion of “straight teeth = perfection” and not the benefits of orthodontics, like how aligned teeth cause less stress on other teeth and the gums and can prevent TMJ. They are easier to clean, which leads to fewer future problems, like root canals. Plus, the psychological benefit can not be underestimated. My best friend is so self-conscious about her smile, that she covers her mouth when laughing and tries to not allow her smile to be photographed. When it is, she spends hours obsessing about how ugly she is, all based on her teeth.


Why should we educate children? Doesn’t that also contribute to them being the next “hollow porcelain evil corporate scam artist?”

I’m glad many others do not see the world in the same light as you. That, to me, would indicate “doomsday for the world,” more than the recognition that oral health is just as important as other actions we take to make sure our children are healthy.

TheGymNerd
07-13-2011, 06:54 AM
I respectfully disagree.

"I need to prepare myself or my children (whomever needs straight teeth) to be the next hollow porcelain evil corporate scam artist.”

So healthy teeth equate shallowness and criminality to you?

Oral care is like any other health care we provide for our children. If a child is born with other physical deformities, do you also question parents who do what they can to fix them? Or does attempting to provide leg braces, for example, to allow a child to walk normally equate with conformity and criminality to you as well? I think you are not seeing beyond the notion of “straight teeth = perfection” and not the benefits of orthodontics, like how aligned teeth cause less stress on other teeth and the gums and can prevent TMJ. They are easier to clean, which leads to fewer future problems, like root canals. Plus, the psychological benefit can not be underestimated. My best friend is so self-conscious about her smile, that she covers her mouth when laughing and tries to not allow her smile to be photographed. When it is, she spends hours obsessing about how ugly she is, all based on her teeth.


Why should we educate children? Doesn’t that also contribute to them being the next “hollow porcelain evil corporate scam artist?”

I’m glad many others do not see the world in the same light as you. That, to me, would indicate “doomsday for the world,” more than the recognition that oral health is just as important as other actions we take to make sure our children are healthy.

i understand your opinion. And i didnt make my argument to clear.
My main point was arguing for CHILDREN.
If a child doesnt want braces, ok so what. Let them get braces
when they realize maybe it is worth it.
forcing a child to have braces and feel "pain" is similar to calling
a child fat and forcing them to run on a treadmill until they feel pain.
Neither choices are correct. If the child hits puberty and realizes hey
maybe i should straighten my teeth out so be it. If the child hits
puberty and wants to get in better shape and hit the treadmill so be it.
I think intruding anyone's body at any age for minor cosmetic reasons like
braces is unreasonable. Leg braces will effect life and is not comparable to
crooked teeth,unless severe. I guess it depends on how severely the childs
teeth are messed up to really justify forcing a parents will on another soul.
Maybe you are just trying to justify your own actions?

we hear these things to much. "daddy wants johnny to play baseball"
well johnny likes to play video games in reality.
"Mommy wants lindsey to play volley ball". Lindsey likes
to play football and mom doesnt like that idea.
"mommy wants joey to get braces" Joey wants to
have fun and enjoy his pain free life for now. Maybe in
a few years?

EZMONEY
07-13-2011, 08:44 AM
For those all of a sudden concerned...

all 4 of my kids had braces and are doing fine as well adjusted, self supporting adult citizens of our country now...

heck...they even went through my divorce as kids....

so...there is hope.....;)

Skittlez
07-13-2011, 09:02 AM
TheGymNerd, do you even know what braces do? It's not just to straighten teeth. Some people have problems eating food because of their bite alignment, some people have overcrowding and it becomes painful (removing extra teeth, braces to realign the rest of the teeth), there are tons of issues that require braces to fix and if they aren't fixed can lead to much more serious issues down the line. Like gum disease because of difficulty flossing, jaw issues, teeth grinding, so many real HEALTH issues. It's not like people are telling kids they need braces because their teeth are ugly. Your argument is like saying well my child wants to drink soda and live off cake so I should let them. When you're 10 or 12 you don't usually know what's best for you or your health so that's why there are parents to look out for you. It's not like making your kid to get plastic surgery because their nose is too big or something, it's an actual health concern. Shame on you for trying to make parents feel bad about that.

ddc, make sure you make your daughter brushes her teeth really well! It's much harder to keep teeth clean with braces on and I regret that I didn't brush as well when I had them in, even though the bracers were worth it :-P

IsabellaOlivia
07-13-2011, 09:13 AM
I didn't grow up in America, I grew up in a country where you're left out if you don't have braces. Everyone had them. I had them. I had a friend who came to me and cried at the age of 14 because she felt so left out because she didn't have braces....When she got them at 16 she was totally excited.
So to me it's kind of funny to hear that a couple of you opted out of braces because of social reasons.

For adults there is now invisible braces you can get. I think it's called invisaligne or something. Google it.

dcapulet
07-13-2011, 12:25 PM
I'm in the same spot with the 12 yo son - fangs too high and and severe lower crowding. I have an overbite my parents didn't have fixed, and I am still angry over it (although it's not too bad.) needless to say my son is getting the help he needs.

I too believe your daughter will thank you later.

Zeitgeist
07-13-2011, 05:34 PM
TheGymNerd, in response to your question, no I am not trying to justify my own actions, as I do not have children of my own. If I did, you can be assured that braces, if necessary, would be pursued. I have seen too many people, including my own parents and the many teenagers I teach, suffer from a lack of oral care. This is an issue I care deeply about and donate yearly to a local dental charity that provides free care for kids in need. Plus, I don’t know about you, but when I first started living on my own, I could barely make ends meet; no way could I have afforded orthodontic care in my 20s.

Ultimately, I guess my view of parenting is different from yours. Lindsey may not want to read the book, write the paper, or do the homework, but the parent’s role should be to make sure the child is participating in his/her own education. Johnny may want to play video games all day, but the parent should make sure an addiction isn’t being formed and the child is getting exposed to other activities. Shouldn’t parents strive to make sure their children leave the nest with the best opportunities for future success? Further, isn’t it just as bad to force your own political ideologies onto your kid, thus denying them an opportunity they may have wanted in the future? Maybe they wanted to be the next hollow porcelain evil corporate scam artist, but your lack of attention to their oral needs resulted in consistent employment rejection.

I do somewhat see what you are trying to say and there are parents who try to live vicariously through their children and force them into situations they dislike. There are also parents who are too intertwined in their child’s schooling and don’t allow that child to fail and learn on his/her own (I can’t tell you how many parents write their child’s essays for them…). I just disagree that attention to dental care makes someone vain and superficial.

Lovely
07-14-2011, 03:01 AM
I had braces. I lived the life.

Are braces painful? Eh. My mouth ached from time to time, but it wasn't anything other than a minor inconvenience. And this far into the future, nothing but a memory.

I assure anyone who wants to ask that I got braces, because I was getting CAVITIES. It wasn't about my teeth being perfect. They're still not perfect, but they are straighter than they would've been had nothing been done -early- enough. It wasn't about having a perfect smile, it was about being able to brush and floss and rinse normally. So that I could have a HEALTHY smile.

"mommy wants joey to get braces" Joey wants to
have fun and enjoy his pain free life for now. Maybe in
a few years?

It's not a cosmetic issue for most people. We're not discussing parents who are putting their kids under the knife for a beauty pageant or the like. It's a legitimate way to avoid ROTTING teeth in the future by making it easier to brush, floss and care for your mouth.

I'd counter with: "Mommy wants Joey to get glasses" But Joey just wants to run around without something on his face.

Glasses help me see. Braces helped me to keep a clean mouth.

TheGymNerd
07-14-2011, 05:38 AM
TheGymNerd, in response to your question, no I am not trying to justify my own actions, as I do not have children of my own. If I did, you can be assured that braces, if necessary, would be pursued. I have seen too many people, including my own parents and the many teenagers I teach, suffer from a lack of oral care. This is an issue I care deeply about and donate yearly to a local dental charity that provides free care for kids in need. Plus, I don’t know about you, but when I first started living on my own, I could barely make ends meet; no way could I have afforded orthodontic care in my 20s.

Ultimately, I guess my view of parenting is different from yours. Lindsey may not want to read the book, write the paper, or do the homework, but the parent’s role should be to make sure the child is participating in his/her own education. Johnny may want to play video games all day, but the parent should make sure an addiction isn’t being formed and the child is getting exposed to other activities. Shouldn’t parents strive to make sure their children leave the nest with the best opportunities for future success? Further, isn’t it just as bad to force your own political ideologies onto your kid, thus denying them an opportunity they may have wanted in the future? Maybe they wanted to be the next hollow porcelain evil corporate scam artist, but your lack of attention to their oral needs resulted in consistent employment rejection.

I do somewhat see what you are trying to say and there are parents who try to live vicariously through their children and force them into situations they dislike. There are also parents who are too intertwined in their child’s schooling and don’t allow that child to fail and learn on his/her own (I can’t tell you how many parents write their child’s essays for them…). I just disagree that attention to dental care makes someone vain and superficial.

I had braces. I lived the life.

Are braces painful? Eh. My mouth ached from time to time, but it wasn't anything other than a minor inconvenience. And this far into the future, nothing but a memory.

I assure anyone who wants to ask that I got braces, because I was getting CAVITIES. It wasn't about my teeth being perfect. They're still not perfect, but they are straighter than they would've been had nothing been done -early- enough. It wasn't about having a perfect smile, it was about being able to brush and floss and rinse normally. So that I could have a HEALTHY smile.



It's not a cosmetic issue for most people. We're not discussing parents who are putting their kids under the knife for a beauty pageant or the like. It's a legitimate way to avoid ROTTING teeth in the future by making it easier to brush, floss and care for your mouth.

I'd counter with: "Mommy wants Joey to get glasses" But Joey just wants to run around without something on his face.

Glasses help me see. Braces helped me to keep a clean mouth.

you both bring about the same point ultimately and i agree. If the kid cant
floss his teeth because the teeth are to crammed together. Get braces to
prevent cavities.

TIARA
07-14-2011, 05:59 AM
Im not a parent and ive never had to use braces but ill reply anyway..lol
You should make her get it. She will thank you in the end. It will hurt but hey it will be benifical to her in the end and i believe she rather get it now then have it when she's an adult. My sister and friends all had braces they were considered cool . I secretly wanted braces just so i could get all the cool colors on my teeth. Also braces arnt forever. remind her of that.

nelie
07-14-2011, 07:38 AM
I am going to close this thread. If you don't understand what problems can be caused by not getting braces, then you should read up on it. My dental health issues were caused by lack of braces but I didn't understand that until a dentist explained it to me. It isn't about straight teeth, it is about what improper alignment can do to your teeth. I had straight teeth and needed braces. The cosmetics of my teeth didn't change but the alignment sure did.