Diabetes Support - Study Shows extream low calorie diet may cure Diabetes




Lori Bell
06-25-2011, 03:00 PM
I heard this on the news yesterday and found it very interesting. Seems it might be something to talk to your doctor about if you are suffering from Type 2 Diabetes.

British docs say they can cure diabetes: How?

Can a diet cure type 2 diabetes? That's what British researchers are saying, after a low calorie diet reversed diabetes for 11 people.Read more: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-20074135-10391704.html#ixzz1QJdnfl9Z


silverbirch
06-25-2011, 03:24 PM
I read about this yesterday too. There must have been a press release. :) The very small-scale study was funded by a charity, Diabetes UK. Here's a fuller report from the BBC.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-13887909

And a background report from the BBC. Only 4 out of the 11 were still free of type 2 diabetes 18 months later.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13907960

Floriduh
06-25-2011, 11:44 PM
Interesting story, indeed! Thanks for posting this article. I was diagnosed with Type 2 DM almost 4 weeks ago. Have been researching everything available to learn about the disease.

The analytical voice inside of me says, "not enough information to reach conclusion." A 2/3 failure rate at 18 months is only slightly better than smoking cessation programs. I wonder what sort of nutrition education and support the participants received. The thought of 600 calories/day for eight weeks makes me weak. :dizzy:


Ruthxxx
06-26-2011, 06:54 AM
I'm wondering about the success rate too. At 600 calories, there sure would have to be a lot of supplementation. My friend is a well-known Canadian endocrinologist - I must get his opinion.

Bac0s
06-28-2011, 06:32 PM
And a background report from the BBC. Only 4 out of the 11 were still free of type 2 diabetes 18 months later.



Which makes it sound like they're being a little fast and loose with the word "cure." Just like it can be controlled by low carb (to the point where you can be med-free), it might be another option? But who'd want to? Ugh.

zebrastripes
07-02-2011, 02:45 PM
I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in april and would love to try this. Do you think I'd be ok to do it alone? I asked my doc and was less than helpful :(

silverbirch
07-02-2011, 04:48 PM
:wave: zebrastripes!

No, I don't. I think this was a closely monitored study and it's not a good idea for people to fly solo. Have you found the Diabetes support board here? They will have ideas. Another place for advice might be your practice nurse. Some surgeries and hospitals have a diabetes nurse, I think, too.

fatmad
07-02-2011, 06:41 PM
hmm, interesting approach. I am interested in the kick start for making insulin. But we know that simply losing weight reduces insulin resistance, and some of us make lots of insulin, but resist it. I also think I would need to be off work and in some sort of treatment centre to stick to this.

Bac0s
07-03-2011, 12:35 PM
hmm, interesting approach. I am interested in the kick start for making insulin. But we know that simply losing weight reduces insulin resistance, and some of us make lots of insulin, but resist it.

Right? As does reducing carbs, and at 600 calories a day there's not a lot of room for carbs there.

Wannabehealthy
07-04-2011, 08:36 AM
I heard this on the news yesterday and found it very interesting. Seems it might be something to talk to your doctor about if you are suffering from Type 2 Diabetes.



I didn't see this, but I am not surprised. One of the benefits of gastric bypass surgery is the "cure" of diabetes. I worked at a big company and a lot of people there had this surgery and some were able to stop their diabetes meds. You know, their initial calorie consumption is extremely low. Most of them gained back a lot or all of the weight in time. I wonder if they then had to start back on their diabetes meds. I retired last year and am no longer in the loop.

Carol

kjsspot
08-07-2011, 04:00 PM
I think remission would be a better term than cure. If they go back to their old eating habits the D will come back whereas a non-D won't have this problem regardless of what they eat.

misstraveller
08-19-2011, 02:30 PM
Lyposuction and stomach stapling have also been rumored to "cure" the betes, but I'm not running out to get that. Although I would rather have the lyposuction than eat like a starving person...

kelly315
08-19-2011, 03:32 PM
Well, I suppose that makes sense- eating so little (and so few foods that increase blood sugar) would require your pancreas to make less insulin, perhaps giving it a chance to "catch up." Or, it could simply be that losing weight helps to ease the burden of DB.

However, I don't necessarily agree with this article being so public, because I'm afraid that there will be people out there that see it and want to try it. It's extremely dangerous to have a diet like that, and without proper medical supervision it could be deadly.

misstraveller
08-23-2011, 11:04 AM
@Ruthxxx - please share your doc friend's opinion.. i think we'd all be interested.

Iconised Ghost
08-24-2011, 08:15 PM
I work as an intern health psychologist at diabetes clinics in 2 hospitals, and we discussed this article at our journal club with the dietitians, endocrinologists, etc. I think the conclusion we came to is that its a bit misleading and irresponsible for it to be advertised as a cure, when the sample size is so small and there was such a high "relapse". I think we reckoned that it was more that the diabetes went into remission- which I believe we already knew can happen with weight loss, change in life style etc anyway with Type 2. Its really sad, people came into the clinic for a couple of weeks being really excited that there might be a cure, to find out that actually they've been mislead and we had to tell them that it wasnt the case.

Anyways, sorry for crashing your thread as a non-Diabetic, just thought you might be interested in what they thought. And always consult your doctor before you go about this kinda thing i guess, blah blah blah im not responsible for your health

misstraveller
08-25-2011, 09:38 AM
Thanks for the information Iconised! (Nice to see you here, too, I usually see you in 20somethings!). I discussed with my fiance' and it did make us hopeful, but I would never try it without talking to my betes Doc first.

LOL, nice disclaimer btw.

Iconised Ghost
08-25-2011, 03:04 PM
haha well i thought since people here were up in arms about this article i should share, sorry to dash people's hopes! But a bit of remission isnt a bad thing either right? So it could still be worth talking to your diabetes doc about. People just end up hoping for miracles and this isnt it sadly.

Thanks xD

Wannabehealthy
08-26-2011, 09:30 AM
I work as an intern health psychologist at diabetes clinics in 2 hospitals, and we discussed this article at our journal club with the dietitians, endocrinologists, etc. I think the conclusion we came to is that its a bit misleading and irresponsible for it to be advertised as a cure, when the sample size is so small and there was such a high "relapse". I think we reckoned that it was more that the diabetes went into remission- which I believe we already knew can happen with weight loss, change in life style etc anyway with Type 2.

Say, a person lost weight, exercised and was told she no longer had to take her meds or test her blood glucose. Would she still have to follow her same carb concious diet? I know someone who did this, and I am just wondering about this long term. Would she continue to be in remission as long as she kept her weight down and exercised? Or is there a chance her diabetic symptoms could come back anyway?

Carol

Iconised Ghost
08-27-2011, 05:04 PM
I am not a diabetic nurse or endocrinologist so all i can do is report what ive been told by them. With that in mind, i have asked these people that same question and was told that chances are that the symptoms will come back. BUT how long they can stay in remission varies. You could stay in remission for 15 years, go back on metformin for 15 years, then need a tincy bit of insulin for 15 years (because you've maintained your lifestyle/weight loss etc). And if you were, I dunno, say 45 to begin with, you'd be 90 by that time.

Its all very tricky. Basically, my understanding is that there is no cure for diabetes, once you've got it you've got it, but there are things that can put it into remission, and sometimes remission is a long time

fatmad
08-28-2011, 08:33 AM
I am not a diabetic nurse or endocrinologist so all i can do is report what ive been told by them. With that in mind, i have asked these people that same question and was told that chances are that the symptoms will come back. BUT how long they can stay in remission varies. You could stay in remission for 15 years, go back on metformin for 15 years, then need a tincy bit of insulin for 15 years (because you've maintained your lifestyle/weight loss etc). And if you were, I dunno, say 45 to begin with, you'd be 90 by that time.

Its all very tricky. Basically, my understanding is that there is no cure for diabetes, once you've got it you've got it, but there are things that can put it into remission, and sometimes remission is a long time

its very important for us to remember that progression of this disease is not our fault either. One can do everything right, and still get diabetes (not all type 2 diabetics are overweight for instance). It can still progress, even under good control.
We can do our best, and that will give us better health and better life. That part is up to us!

Iconised Ghost
08-29-2011, 03:08 AM
I think you hit it on the head, fatmad. And sadly most of the general public doesnt know that its not your fault :(

JingerBird
09-02-2011, 07:58 AM
I'm not sure that I would be able to sustain 600 cals for 8 weeks. Even if it is for a cure! My diabetes is a result of my lifestyle (I am the only one in my family with it) I have eaten my way through so many calories, grams of sugar etc that I have now got this condition for life and although I do quite well now, food is a huge issue for me and I suspect it always will be.

synger
10-20-2011, 02:56 PM
Some people are looking at this study, and the studies about intermittent fasting (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intermittent_fasting)that seem to show improved BG indicators, and doing the JUDDD program. (Up day/down day, or alternate day diet)

Basically, you eat about 600 calories one day, then the next 2200 or so. The two-day average is about what you'd need to lose weight (1400, in this case), but your body doesn't go into the dreaded "starvation mode". The every-other-day refeeding keeps you from changing your metabolism, and the calorie restriction (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calorie_restriction) can give you health benefits (better insulin response, anti-aging and reduced risk of cancer, for three). I've heard those who follow it say that as long as you eat your full allotment of up-day calories, the down-day restriction isn't that bad.

I've been trying it now for about a week (was doing IF for the last few months), and am liking it quite a bit. The scale is beginning to move in the right direction again, and my blood sugars are stabilizing.

YMMV... I am an unmedicated pre-diabetic, so it may be more dangerous to try a diet plan that restricts food if you need diabetes medications.