General chatter - So who has a bachelor's degree?




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glassmenagerie
06-23-2011, 01:21 PM
I'm still working on mine, but I just like to ask others these questions!

What is your degree in? Why did you choose your particular major? Is your current job related to your degree? Do you wish you would have chosen a different major? If so, what would you have chosen? Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree (proving that they can think and use their brain to some extent :D) is more important than what they chose to major in?

I'm majoring in History right now, and while I don't feel like it's a mistake I'm wondering if there is a more practical application for it. I could always teach, that's a given, but I'm thinking maybe I'll switch my major to Library Science and minor in History, and look at becoming an academic librian.

I don't know! I'm just tired of people telling me I'm making a bad choice when I feel like it's a good one.


djs06
06-23-2011, 01:41 PM
My undergraduate degree is in English, and I minored in women's studies.

My graduate degree (master's) is in public policy and administration.

I work as a research study coordinator at a university. It has pretty much nothing to do with my UG degree- although I think it gave me a lot of good skills. I think there's a lot to be said for majoring in the humanities- it gives you a wide breadth of knowledge and skills that can benefit any job (spoken like a true liberal arts college alumna!)

I want to work as a grant writer for a nonprofit organization or for a foundation or local government. :) Haven't gotten there yet, though! I work for a doctor so hearing about her clinical activities kinda makes me wish I'd been more scientifically inclined... I am just interested in everything! :)

I'm also a strong believer that getting the degree is the most important part, not necessarily what you get it in, unless you have a very specific job target. So do what you enjoy and don't let people tell you otherwise!

ERHR
06-23-2011, 01:47 PM
I have a BS in physics and I'm now working on a PhD in biomedical engineering. I chose my undergrad degree because I just loved the field and wasn't too concerned with how I would use it - though there is an advantage in the sciences that people will think you're smart for doing that as a major even though there may be little practical use for a BS in physics or biology or whatever. (You really have to go on to graduate study to enjoy career advancement if you stay in research.) Employability factored in a little bit for my choice of doctoral degree. I mean, I still was very interested in the field of study but it didn't hurt that it's projected to have the highest growth rate of any sector over the next 10 years.

I think if you want to pursue a liberal arts degree because that's what you're interested in that's fine, but to increase your chances of finding a job (you like) you should expend every effort in getting summer internships or semester externships or part-time work or volunteering or shadowing people or informational interviewing - and those things don't necessarily have to be in your major field. You can't start thinking about career choices, garnering work experience, or networking too early, in my opinion.


irishlad
06-23-2011, 01:49 PM
Things are different here in Ireland but I have an honours Bachelors Degree in Engineering. If I was back again, I might do the same or else maybe go into sports, sports injury, physiotherapy. Had an injury and since then had more of an interest in this area. however really like my job and what career I am in. Do only what YOU want, the way I see it you have to work at it for 8 hours a day, I would rather do something I enjoy, and get paid peanuts, than something I hate and get paid great. Its not nice waking up every morning hating work and dreading the next day, and its for the future so do what you want, and let them others judge you if they want, at least you are happy, sometimes these people are just jealous because they are not happy in their job! Its similiar to weight loss in ways, others can be supportive or jealous, put you down etc, but do it for YOU and smile going to work every day.

astrophe
06-23-2011, 01:50 PM
What is your degree in?

graphic design with a minor on photo

Why did you choose your particular major?

Because I like it.

Is your current job related to your degree?

Nope. SAHM. :)

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major?

Nope. Though maybe wish a different school.

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree (proving that they can think and use their brain to some extent ) is more important than what they chose to major in?


I don't even think the degree matters much less what it is in. I know lots of people without who can use their brain and lots of people with who seem useless!

I also know some who have too many degrees (ex: masters and phd) and it holds them back in getting a job if they list it in their resume because then they are perceived as overeducated.

But then I also know others who have degrees that served them well, and others still who just take it like a learning journey and don't really worry about it.

It's a mixed bag for sure.

A.

caryesings
06-23-2011, 01:59 PM
BS in Biology because I found it fascinating. Still do, though most of my adult career has been in the computer field. Which interestingly enough, I've never even had a class in. So obviously for me having the degree was more important than what it was in. However I do wonder if in this economy this is still the case. It seems like there are so many applicants for any given job that the folks (or computers) doing the screening are going to look for education matches to job descriptions.

glassmenagerie
06-23-2011, 01:59 PM
Such good answers! Good advice, too.

I should have been more careful about the degree = using your brain part. That is a pretty harsh generalization, and I apologize. I hope you all can see what I'm trying to say even though it was poorly expressed.

It's nice to hear from people who went down the liberal arts path as well! I'm definitely feeling more encouraged.

nelie
06-23-2011, 02:10 PM
BS = Computer Science (specialization in Artificial Intelligence)
MS = Information Systems/Information Security

Do I use my degree? I certainly use the knowledge from my degree and knowledge gained on the job and what not based on what I was taught in college. I would say though that a BS if very breadth based so there is no real way to use all you learned in undergrad. Graduate school is more in depth so that is when you generally get to zero in on an area you like.

Having said that, I am now taking undergrad classes again to pursue an entirely different field.

mandalinn82
06-23-2011, 02:10 PM
What is your degree in?

Human Development (Bachelor of Science)

Why did you choose your particular major?

I started as a Genetics major and really, really struggled with Organic Chemistry - this major incorporated Genetics, but with less hard science and more other subjects I enjoyed (Psych, Sociology, etc)

Is your current job related to your degree?

Nope. I design computer software for a medical laboratory software company.

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major?

Possibly. I'm very happy with where I am, but think I'd be equally happy if I'd toughed it out as a Genetics major.

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree (proving that they can think and use their brain to some extent ) is more important than what they chose to major in?

Yes. Most office-type jobs are looking for people to show that they can set a goal (a degree), work toward it, and achieve it, and that they have basic general knowledge (reading comprehension, writing skills). Any college degree will show that.

geoblewis
06-23-2011, 02:13 PM
I have taken several stabs at a variety of degrees. FINALLY got mine at 50!

What is your degree in?
Double major: professional writing and digital media communication

Why did you choose your particular major?
I've always loved to write, and will actually be pursuing an MFA in writing next. But the second degree was to become a web designer.

Is your current job related to your degree?
Yes, I'm now a web designer and content writer with my own business.

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major?
I've chosen many majors over the years...I love to learn. Kinda want to go back to study more literature, philosophy, anthropology, foreign languages, etc.

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree (proving that they can think and use their brain to some extent ) is more important than what they chose to major in?
A degree is something that will help someone get their first job. Many times, it doesn't matter what the major was, unless it's more about scientific or technical pursuits.

There's a lot to be said for actual work experience.

mayness
06-23-2011, 02:25 PM
I have a BS in Bioinformatics. I loved biology in high school and I loved my computer programming classes, and when I realized I could do BOTH in college and not even have to leave my hometown, I was sold. Sometimes I wish I had majored in physics or chemistry... I wouldn't have enjoyed it nearly as much, but the people I know who went that direction seem to have a different way of thinking about math/numbers that makes things easier for them.

I ended up doing a "5"-year BS/MS program (I spent 6 years on it :p) because I thought I wanted to go straight into a job after that. I did my MS research in a biochemistry lab and realized a) I wanted a PhD and b) I didn't really want to sit in front of a computer anymore. So, now I'm working on a PhD in Biochemistry/Cell Biology. So I'm not directly applying my BS degree, since I don't do any computer stuff anymore, but it did give me the biology/chemistry background that I needed to get into grad school.

These days there's so much "inflation" when it comes to education that I don't really place much importance on a bachelor's degree. It's more impressive to me when a college student seeks out non-classwork opportunities to apply their skills, like relevant work experience or internships, starting their own business, writing a book, publishing papers, doing research, volunteering, tutoring, etc. I think you should get whatever degree will let you get the job that you think you want, don't be afraid to change your mind, and take advantage of everything your college has to offer.

SCraver
06-23-2011, 02:32 PM
What is your degree in?
BS = Human Development and Family Relations
Masters: MBA

Why did you choose your particular major?
This is sort of a long story. I wanted to do psychology. My dad suggested Nursing (easier to get a job at the time). I couldn't handle the Chemistry. Then switched to HDFR.

Is your current job related to your degree?
I never did anything related to HDFR. But just having a degree helped me get the jobs I've had. I went bad to school to get m MBA b/c I felt that was little more related to what I was/am doing. I did a lot of AP/AR and am now doing accounting type work - more related to financial controls.

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major?
If so, what would you have chosen?
I think if I had a Bachelor's degree in accounting, I would be a lot further along in my career... but when I went to college, I was more interested in expanding my social circle than attending class. I think being an HDFR major and taking classes I was interested in was the only way I ended up making it through my Undergrad life.

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree is more important than what they chose to major in?
I totally agree with what mandalinn said. It's about showing you can make a commitment and see it through - not about the specific degree (unless you are going for something specific - like pharmacy, etc.)

SocialDeimos
06-23-2011, 02:32 PM
What is your degree in?
I have a BA in Sociology. I'm working on my MA in Sociology as well.
Why did you choose your particular major?
I had started and stopped school four or five times, and then I took my first soc. class and I really felt invested in the subject matter. It ended up being something that I really enjoyed (instead of just being something that I was good at)
Is your current job related to your degree?
I'm in the SAHM/full time student category right now
Do you wish you would have chosen a different major?
Nah
Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree (proving that they can think and use their brain to some extent ) is more important than what they chose to major in?
I think that part of the prestige from having a degree is just the idea that you were able to make it through the brain work, but at the same time, I don't think that all degrees were created (or gained) equal(ly)

Ashley777
06-23-2011, 02:34 PM
I work at a university, if you have a bachelor's degree it is a good deal no matter what you major in. It shows you have drive and determination and you know how to work and think. With that being said if there is a specific field you want to go into it would difinately help if you had a major in the field but if you are happy where you are at don't let other people tell you it is a bad choice. The choice is yours and you are the one who has to live with it. People seem to love telling others what to do!

midwife
06-23-2011, 02:34 PM
My BS is in Nursing, and I think that my BSN and RN might be the most valuable things I possess. I have a masters degree and practice as a midwife (haha, surprise!) but I know that whatever happens in the economy or health care or whatever, I have knowledge, skills, licensure, etc., so my kids will be fed and clothed and housed. So I do believe in practicality! However I also love love love being a midwife and I do believe in following one's interests.

I actually started out as a history major and I still love and enjoy history, but that is not how I pay the bills. :lol: As for my own kids, I want them to have a broad education and knowledgable about liberal arts, but I also want them to have a knowledge base or skillset for which other people will want to pay them.

So, from a practical viewpoint, major in history and minor in Spanish or computers or ????. Get some business or language or computer background. I wish I had more of a computer background.

RoadtotheNewMe1217
06-23-2011, 02:50 PM
What is your degree in?
Bachelor or Arts: Business Management and French (Graduated in 2009)

Why did you choose your particular major?
I really enjoyed learning French and traveling and I knew I wanted to do something in the business world.

Is your current job related to your degree?
Kind of, I'm in sales which you can do with pretty much any degree. Sadly, it's not where I'm happy or want to be at all!!

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major?
I would have either triple majored or double major minored in either Human Resources, Marketing or Accounting. You really need something beyond business management to actually have more success and get opportunities to actually get into management positions! In the long run though, what I have can get me to my ultimate goal of consulting.

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree (proving that they can think and use their brain to some extent ) is more important than what they chose to major in?
It really depends. Some career field weigh heavily on education and some don't . Take a look at job postings for what you're interested and see if they just require education or would like education and career experience or if even they just require experience. Maybe 25% (if i'm generous) of what you learn in the classroom will be applicable, in the long haul what you learn on the job is what counts. Beyond that, take some other courses you may not think apply but could like logical math or statistics or basic accounting. These can take you a long way.

sacha
06-23-2011, 02:51 PM
I have a BA degree in TESL (teaching English as a second language) and TBH I regret it, there's little work available (it's different than a BEd in TESL which means I teach adults, not youth, so I can't work in a public school system).

Shannon in ATL
06-23-2011, 03:06 PM
My BA is in French, with a provisional teaching certificate because I bailed on student teaching at the last minute and a minor in psychology. My MS is in Human Resource Development. I currently work in HR, so close to what my MS involved. My BA is pretty much totally unrelated to anything I do now.

I'm at the point now where I wonder if the costs involved in an undergrad degree outweigh the benefits of a lot of them. For the ones that teach a technical skill like nursing or computers I see it the logic, but I've interviewed a lot of kids with liberal arts degrees who I wouldn't hire if they were my only option. Other degrees too, not just liberal arts degrees. I interviewed dozens of degreed accounting candidates who couldn't actually do any accounting work, some couldn't even do much basic math. I don't know if the fault was with the school that they attended or the effort they put in, but the ones with college degrees seemed to use them as a fallback and still didn't know what they were doing.

ann71
06-23-2011, 03:22 PM
djs06:
Don't know how far down the path toward grant writing you are. Just wanted to offer some advice. Hope it's helpful, ignore if not. :)

I fell into the field after volunteering for a group that turned out to desperately need fundraising help. I started out writing pretty small applications; by the end I'd written a (successful) multi-year application to the Paul Allen Foundation.

After about a year as a volunteer- a pretty hard core year, but still working another job elsewhere- I was reasonably qualified and managed to get a job doing it. I left after a few years, because it turns out I didn't love the work, but... There are not actually that many good grant writers in the world, so if you are one, you can make a go at it.

But it's also important to choose your volunteer gig wisely. Some groups are just not financially stable enough to be a good funding risk. No point in volunteering for a year with a terrible success rate either. My gig involved homeless teens and was super "feel good." Good luck!

As for the original question, I have bachelor's in chemistry, worked at a biotech firm a few years, got a masters in Env. Health, worked at the EPA for 7 years, did my grant writing stint, went back again to study accounting, now work in a budget office. I may have a short attention span! But I've loved the variety in my working life over the years and most of my jobs have directly used my education.

ann71
06-23-2011, 03:24 PM
oh, and Shannon, I hear you about the accounting students. I went back as a 35 year old, and there were 19 year olds in my classes who were clearly there because they heard that accounting was a stable career. They did badly in the classes, didn't enjoy it, and had zero aptitude.

glassmenagerie
06-23-2011, 03:42 PM
I hear you as well, Shannnon. I actually just returned to school at 30 years old. I had a few classes under my belt already that I had taken just after I finished high school when I was still majoring in Spanish. After an eleven year break I decided to go back and thought I was going to stick with Spanish but quickly realized it was not what I wanted and was pretty miserable.

Now I've changed to History and I'm loving every minute of it, and will probably do much better now that I am majoring in something I am interested in. If I am going to do something, I want to do it well.

JenMusic
06-23-2011, 03:51 PM
My undergraduate degree is a BM (Bachelor of Music) in Music Education. I only taught in the public school system for a year before leaving to work as a music resource person for my church. Then I moved to China, fell in love with teaching English as a Second Language, and got my MA in that field. Now I'm back in the States teaching ESL to university students here.

I've never regretted my undergraduate degree, even though I didn't end up in that field permanently. I studied what I loved, made lifelong friends (music majors, like some other majors, tend to be a close-knit group) and the process of working hard to get my degree taught me a lot about discipline and hard work.

I think life takes us down a lot of different paths. Working with college students myself, I'm reminded daily how difficult it is to make decisions now that can impact the entire course of our lives, but at the same time I think it's helpful to remember that paths can change and we can always try something different.

Glory87
06-23-2011, 04:03 PM
What is your degree in?
I have 2 degrees - I double majored in Political Science and French Language and Literature.

Why did you choose your particular major?
Honestly, no real reason. I went to college as "undecided." I took a bunch of classes, enjoyed my political science classes, decided to major. I needed a foreign language as a requirement, was doing so great, decided to minor, and then I just needed a few more classes to major.

Is your current job related to your degree?
Not really. I'm a corporate trainer and what I do all day is WRITE. It's really surprising how many people in the corporate world can't write, have no grasp of grammar, so it's a very very handy skill. Thanks to all those term papers and research papers and learning about French grammmar!

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major?
Eh, not really. I adored college, loved my classes and as long as I have a degree, it really doesn't matter what it is. I love my current job and can't think of anything else I'd really enjoy doing more.

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree (proving that they can think and use their brain to some extent :D) is more important than what they chose to major in?
Well, I wouldn't phrase it like that, that seems kind of rude (there are lots of people without degrees who think just fine). In my case, the "what" of my degree is less important than just having one. It has opened doors for me in the corporate world, just having a degree made me more employable.

I do think I got very lucky falling in to my line of work. I work for a wonderful company, I make a really good living with excellent benefits but I was LUCKY. I got my first real job at 27 because my dad knew a guy and got me an interview.

A better degree might have opened even more doors for me.

glassmenagerie
06-23-2011, 04:09 PM
Well, I wouldn't phrase it like that, that seems kind of rude (there are lots of people without degrees who think just fine).

Which is why I apologized several posts down for generalizing.

fattymcfatty
06-23-2011, 04:43 PM
I have a BA in History, and a teaching credential in Social Science (which means I can teach History, Geography, Government, Economics, Psychology or Sociology) and a teaching credential in English and a certificate to teach ESL. I went the English/ESL route to pay the bills. History teaching jobs are hard to come by, and they are typically given to men.

Umm...would I change if I had it to do over again? Yes. Teaching High School and Junior High is like being a police officer, but they don't let you have a gun. I got my degree and started teaching very young, and didn't change majors, I was super focused on this "career" I thought was the right path for me. It wasn't. I am trying to find a job in research, etc. I want to do something related to education, support teachers, etc., but not be in a classroom.

I urge you to reach out to a local school and see if you can sit in on a class at a school. You will find that public school has changed A LOT since you were a student.

But if you like supervising school dances where the kids are giving each other lap dances, charging for oral sex out of the bathroom stalls, and filming themselves having sex on their smart phones, go for it!!!

(You can tell I think you should take the librarian route :))

glassmenagerie
06-23-2011, 04:50 PM
I have a BA in History, and a teaching credential in Social Science (which means I can teach History, Geography, Government, Economics, Psychology or Sociology) and a teaching credential in English and a certificate to teach ESL. I went the English/ESL route to pay the bills. History teaching jobs are hard to come by, and they are typically given to men.

Umm...would I change if I had it to do over again? Yes. Teaching High School and Junior High is like being a police officer, but they don't let you have a gun. I got my degree and started teaching very young, and didn't change majors, I was super focused on this "career" I thought was the right path for me. It wasn't. I am trying to find a job in research, etc. I want to do something related to education, support teachers, etc., but not be in a classroom.

I urge you to reach out to a local school and see if you can sit in on a class at a school. You will find that public school has changed A LOT since you were a student.

But if you like supervising school dances where the kids are giving each other lap dances, charging for oral sex out of the bathroom stalls, and filming themselves having sex on their smart phones, go for it!!!

(You can tell I think you should take the librarian route :))

Ugh, you just confirmed everything I ever feared about teaching. Mind you if I ever did teach it would have to be at the university level, but that is still many years down the road and I am looking to the near future for the time being.

Yeah, I think I am going to go the way of the librarian. It is something I have always wanted to do. I figure I can get my BA in History and my MA in Library Science, and HOPEFULLY land a good research job, even if it is not in a library.

It was nice to hear from someone that took this path! Thanks for replying!

djs06
06-23-2011, 05:10 PM
Ann71- Thank you! That's a good point about finding a "good" place to volunteer. While writing one of my service projects I met a wonderful woman who ran an adult learning center. I totally believed in it and was so into their mission, and when I offered to help her with development she was thrilled- but we just couldn't get it together. There was just too much political stuff going on, and unfortunately adult ed isn't terribly "feel good."

Thanks for your input- that's encouraging! :)

theCandEs
06-23-2011, 05:47 PM
First of all, fattymcfatty, OMG! You just scared the life out of me. :( I have two little boys and I worry all the time about bad influences at school. Also, I had considered getting a teaching certificate to teach English. Hm. I guess I will be rethinking that.

Anyway,

What is your degree in? I have two degrees. The first is in Nutrition and Food Science (emphasis on the food science part). I graduated in 1995. The second is in English. I graduated in 2009.

Why did you choose your particular major? Well, I chose the first one because I was under a lot of pressure from my dad to find a career that could support me. I wanted to switch to English about midway, but he wouldn't let me. He said to finish the first one, and then go back later and get the second one if that is what I wanted to do.

Is your current job related to your degree? *sigh* Uh, no. I'm a SAHM currently. I've been looking for a job for the last 2 years. I'm very disappointed with how long it has taken me to find something. I volunteer at the library at my son's school.

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major? Yes, which is why I went back for my English degree.

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree is more important than what they chose to major in? Well, you would hope it would count for something, and that is still my hope, but I've not had much luck so far. Granted, I've become very discouraged and defeated. I go through spurts of looking for a job. I did just turn down a "commission-only" sales job because the thought of selling insurance (especially in today's economy) scares me. Perhaps I should not be so picky, though. ;)

Good luck to you!

fillupthesky
06-23-2011, 06:14 PM
What is your degree in?
BA- (i have two) psychology and italian language and literature
MSW (masters in social work)


Why did you choose your particular major?
i love psychology and wanted to become a therapist :)

Is your current job related to your degree?
well, i'm currently unemployed, but my last job was in the field. i find that since i'm early on in my career, it's difficult to find actual therapy jobs- a lot of jobs out there for me are more case management, which is a combination of light therapy, and making sure that your clients have stable housing, benefits, and are linked with the proper community resources.

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major?
sometimes, but no necessarily to change careers. i took a few linguistics classes as an undergrad, and LOVED it. i almost switched majors, but i was a junior...

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree is more important than what they chose to major in?
i think it depends on the field. some kind of jobs require knowledge in that specific field, others don't. at the end of the day, go with your gut and what feels right :)

theox
06-23-2011, 07:40 PM
What is your degree in?

BA in History, working on my MLIS.

Why did you choose your particular major?

I found the history courses that I took while knocking out core curriculum requirements to be much more interesting than the philosophy classes I was taking for my major. I also figured a history degree would probably be marginally more marketable than a philosophy degree.

Is your current job related to your degree?

My graduate assistantship does allow me to use the knowledge and some of the skills I learned as an undergrad. I worked for a few years between finishing my BA and starting the MLIS, and some of those gigs - park rangering types of jobs, mostly - did allow me to use my degree. When I worked in jobs that were not related to my degree, it was because I chose to do so. It's possible to get history-related jobs that aren't teaching jobs, but you'll probably have to seek them out, work harder to get them, and be content with the knowledge that you're unlikely to make a lot of money or have a lot of job security. ;)

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major? If so, what would you have chosen?

Not really. I sometimes think it would be nice to have more of a background in political science, but just because that's also something I'm interested in. I have sometimes wished that I had a greater aptitude for math or science, or was more money-oriented, but - good or bad - I'm very well suited to liberal arts/humanities sorts of things.

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree is more important than what they chose to major in?

No. I don't think being awarded a particular academic qualification is a very meaningful measure of a person. There are plenty of people who are intelligent, motivated, and productive (and sometimes quite wealthy) who have little or no post-secondary education. There are also plenty of people who have diplomas on the wall but apparently never received their subject expertise or critical thinking skills in the mail.

It might not always be important to potential employers, but I think choice of major is important. In some fields it's the easiest and fastest (or only) way to acquire important theoretical and practical skills. Choice of major and school can also tell a lot about a person. People make choices for lots of different reasons, and it would be wrong to judge a person solely on his/her school or major. However, those pieces of information can tell you a lot about a person's background, strengths, personal values, and priorities, especially if the person explains his/her reasoning.


Unsolicited advice ;):

Like I said above, there are a lot of other things you can do besides teach with a BA in history. And teaching may not be a good thing to count on. Many (maybe all) of the public education systems in the US are dysfunctional, and the current political and economic climate is one that is conducive to the loss of compensation, benefits, and respect. Being a good teacher is hard work - not only do you have to know your subject, you've got to do prep work and grading for classes (on your own time), be able to manage your classroom effectively, and (at least in this area) put up with a lot of bureaucratic and political BS. History also often doesn't seem to be in demand (except in very dysfunctional districts that have trouble keeping staff because the working conditions are so bad) and, if your area is like mine, then social studies teachers are hired mainly for their ability/willingness to coach a sport or do extracurricular gruntwork. Depending on your state's licensing requirements, you might also have to take education classes or other extra coursework to become certified to teach. I've got a lot of relatives and friends who are teachers, and wouldn't advise anybody to take that path unless they really wanted to teach.

If you are not doing some sort of extracurricular activity that's related to your degree or the field you want to go into, now is the time to start. Getting a degree-related gig as a student employee, intern (paid or unpaid), or volunteer will give you valuable experience you can use to build your resume and may open doors for you. I got my first National Park Service job (a student position, but still Federal service) as a result of volunteer work I had done at that park a year earlier. That led to other opportunities in the Park Service. I've still got friends and valuable contacts from my time with that agency. Working in an area you're interested in might also help you figure out what you really want to do, and help you pinpoint your professional strengths and preferences.

As for library science - have you spoken with academic librarians about the prospects and entry requirements for those sorts of jobs? My studies are concentrated on other facets of the LIS world, but almost all the library/archives jobs I see want candidates to have the MLIS. I'm not sure how far a BLS alone will get you. Talking to several people in the field might give you a better idea of the outlook for academic libraries and what you should do to get where you want to be. If you don't volunteer, intern, or work at a library (academic or otherwise), start now. It will help you figure out what you do (and don't) want to do, could provide you with valuable references and contacts, and will add weight to future applications for library jobs and admission to MLIS programs.

Who's telling you're making a bad choice by majoring in history? If they are people that are important to you, then you might want to sit down with them and they can explain their reasoning, then you can explain yours. A lot of people don't really understand what you can do with a degree in history, but if you can confidently explain your reasons for majoring in it and tell them what you're doing to get a career started (whether it's directly related to your degree or not), it might get them off your back.

If people you don't really know are saying this, why worry? When I was an undergrad I would occasionally be chastised for my choice of major by casual acquaintances or strangers who had struck up a conversation with me (as happens in the South). Most, if not all, of the people who felt compelled to criticize my choice of major (and by implication me) were poorly educated and poorly paid, had very limited knowledge of the activities or opportunities available in the world outside of the region's red clay farming communities or little mill towns that don't have mills anymore, had the fatalistic worldview and apathetic attitude prevalent among certain groups in the region, and really just came from a different culture and had different values than I did. That was okay, and I respected their opinions and where those opinions came from. However, I was coming from a different place. I knew what I valued, that I would find my way by working hard and trying to be smart and realistic, and that I had the support of my parents. If this is the sort of thing that's happening to you, don't worry too much about it. Just smile, shrug, provide your reasoning calmly and without being defensive, or say you'll have to agree to disagree on the matter. Stay focused on doing what you can to be successful - whatever that means to you.

Regardless of who's criticizing your choice of major, being able to show that you've researched your options and are working to make a career in a history-related field (and librarianship certainly can be one of those) will give you some conversational leverage and help show people that you're mature, thoughtful, and hardworking. People who criticized me after finding out that I was a history major and didn't plan on teaching tended to switch subjects after I informed them that I was using my coursework in my cool government job. :D


Good luck!

MedChick87
06-23-2011, 08:34 PM
I'm about to graduate at the end of the summer so I figured I'd toss in my 2 cents!

What is your degree in?
BS in Psychology, minors in Biology and Criminology. I'll be starting my Master's in Clinical Psychology in the fall!


Why did you choose your particular major?
I switched my major a dozen times (literally) and finally came to psychology b/c I just loved every psych class I was in. I'm good at it and I found I loved learning about it and studying it. Plus I feel I have the right set of personality characteristics to be a psychologist, if that makes sense.


Is your current job related to your degree?
No, but I just work part time and will until I get my PhD. At that point I'd love to work in the Neuropsychology field.


Do you wish you would have chosen a different major?
If so, what would you have chosen?
Nope! If anything I would have done Biology, since I minored in that.


Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree is more important than what they chose to major in?
Maybe in some fields, yes. But I do believe in a lot of fields it's important to have the right qualifications, so to speak, in terms of classes you've taken and skills you've accumulated.

freezie
06-23-2011, 08:55 PM
What is your degree in?
I have a business degree, graduated in 2008.

Why did you choose your particular major?
Process of elimination :o lol. I figured it was my best bet in terms of career options after graduation, and my ability to tolerate the content.

Is your current job related to your degree?
Yes! Turns out I'm good at the business related stuff. Total fluke, but I really picked the best major for my personality and potential. I'm currently a business analyst. Before this, I worked for 2 years in a mindless, hardly-related job which sucked. But it got me where i am today, so i can't complain!

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major? If so, what wo.uld you have chosen?
Nope. Turns out i really enjoy, and am good at what I do.

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree (proving that they can think and use their brain to some extent :D) is more important than what they chose to major in?
I think both are important, and it will depend on the employer. For me, they wouldn't even have considered hiring someone without post-secondary business education. And, surprisingly, I'm actually using a LOT of what I learned in university.

I will also say though, that i've met people with degrees who still cannot use their brain. In fact, I graduated with someone who still didn't understand the problem with plagiarism. So having a degree doesn't necessarily prove anything.

Some professions are extremely difficult to get into without that specific education. With many others, you can get your foot in the door just by proving you're capable of learning. So I think it depends.

Sunshine87
06-23-2011, 08:55 PM
What is your degree in? Tomorrow I will have my Master of Occupational Therapy
Why did you choose your particular major? I shadowed an Occupational Therapist and fell in love. I enjoy working with people and it is a very helping profession which fits me perfectly.
Is your current job related to your degree? I am not currently employed. I will be once I pass my boards exam. I have already gotten 2 job offers though.
Do you wish you would have chosen a different major? No
Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree (proving that they can think and use their brain to some extent ) is more important than what they chose to major in? No. Having a degree does nothing for you if it does not add to your career. I know many people who have $100,000 of school debt with a job that is not related to their field.
My advice is that you choose a job that makes decent money, has a good job market, and is something that you would like. There are many jobs that just want a degree in anything but these jobs often pay less. A degree is a means to an end. Figure out your destination first. Good luck!

CorinneIrene
06-23-2011, 09:22 PM
I returned to school this past fall to get a bachelor's in Wildlife Management.

I regret going to college straight out of high school. While I had the maturity and level headed-ness to achieve a very good GPA the first time around, none of the majors offered at the college I was attending appealed to me.

So, I dropped out, took some time off and transferred to where I'm at today. I chose my major based on my passion for conservation and love of the outdoors.

My current job is not related in any way to my major. Means to an end! I love my job, but it's not going to be a career for me.

I wouldn't change my major for anything. It's a very hands on program and is something that I really, truly enjoy. If you enjoy your job, you'll never work a day in your life, they say.

The field that I'll be going into is extremely competitive, so it will be very tough going, but I believe my school, because it is a Bachelor of Technology and is extremely hands on will give me an advantage. Plus, I'm willing to go absolutely anywhere and start at the very bottom rung.

I don't believe having a degree is more important than what the degree is in, and I'm probably in the minority here. Unfortunately, our society is requiring degrees for fields that just should not require it, or a certificate at most. It has become nearly impossible to get a good job without a degree, unless you have connections. Yet, so many jobs are better learned through hands on experience. I know many people who have a degree in something general and end up doing something that is completely unrelated to their previous major- the employer doesn't care what the degree is in, just as long as you have one. Why? It's forcing us all to be in debt before our careers start. I suppose I am in a roundabout way saying that just having a degree is more important than the field it's in- but I wish it weren't so! If I weren't set on becoming a biologist, I probably would not be looking for a career that required a degree.

dj mayhem
06-23-2011, 10:13 PM
I'm a senior in college and my degree is in history and secondary education. I have always wanted to teach and I will be in a year.

There are so many things you can do with a degree in history! I'll pm you the list that they post in my college's history department. You can do anything from working in a museum to working for the department of forestry as a park ranger!

krampus
06-23-2011, 10:22 PM
I have a BA in History. I will not go to grad school. I went to a "prestigious" school so I'm hoping I can ride those coattails, but who knows. Fleeing the country for 3 years to teach English abroad is hardly stellar resume material, but I had fun. I'm not an academic kind of person and I don't need a meaningful career, but I do sometimes wish I had majored in engineering or computer science or something "useful."

Oh well!

berryblondeboys
06-23-2011, 10:40 PM
BA in Spanish
MA in Educational Administration.

I've been a stay at home mom for 7 years and I'm about to go back to work.

Surprisingly my Spanish degree has gotten me two or three jobs, but then I never used it. THey just liked they would have a bilingual person there if needed and my other skills were what got me there.

If I were to do it again, I would major in computer science or engineering - for sure. Nothing liberal arts. Pay is crap and the in office politics are for the birds. My husband never has to deal with that stuff because he's in a man's field so even the women in that field aren't the 'standard' female colleague.

I'm probably looking at needing to re-educate or major salary cut.

Michinmn
06-23-2011, 11:46 PM
Well....I am still working toward my BS degree too. BS in HR Management. But thinking about changing it to BS in Business because its less credits.

UGH. It's been a really looong journey. I've been going to school since 2003 for my 4-year degree. No joke. I told myself I’m not getting student loans no way, I had a decent paying job in the HR field and I really felt I found my niche and thought I was being smart not getting student loans, I was paying for my classes out of my own pocket. Thus,.....this is why 2011 I still do not have my degree, (and are you ready for this?) I am no longer in HR!! My last HR job was moving out of state without any offers of me getting to move with it because a bigger company bought the company I was working for and they already had their HR people and were keeping them. Sooo....me still paying for classes on my own I could only afford 1 class per semester...which then turned into a 1 year wait because I was unemployed then started my own insurance business...which let me tell you those State exams are really tough so if any one wants to judge me because I do not have my BS Degree I would like them to take the State Exams to become licensed in Health, Auto, Home, and Life Insurance! LOL.
Anywho....now my insurance biz closed 2+ years ago and I was desperate to find a job and wouldn't you know it because of the economy there were and still are LOTS of competition with Master Degrees so I am toast, no HR job for me...I’ve tried and my 6 years of HR experience doesn’t count for didley.

I believe in doing whatever it takes to put food on the table and pay for roof over our heads....so I had to take the first job that came along.....a Collection Rep for a Law Firm.
And like someone said in previous post, I HATE MY JOB. It sucks to wake up each day because I DREAD going to work. I hate it with all my heart.

I am now a licensed Phlebotomist because I want to get into the medical field and guess what? Cant get an interview because I do not have any experience so here I sit still working at a job I DESPISE still trying to work towards my BS Degree, 1 class at a time, and paying for it out of pocket because I can never find a job that will reimburse and I don’t think I would qualify for student loans now. And I am licensed in Phleb but can’t catch a break. What did I do wrong?? LOL

Now if I had to do it all over again, I would get that student loan/s and finish my degree in the 4-year period. Why? Because I am way in debt with credit card and loans, I can’t even think straight. And still no degree to show for all the debt..... :(

Sorry for the long-winded post....I guess I had to vent.

So, you go for the degree you want because you enjoy it and I believe that in the long run you will have success. Including good pay because you are doing what you are passionate about. :)

Michinmn
06-23-2011, 11:55 PM
I completely agree with you Berryblondeboys!! So much politics in the office world! I can’t stand it. There is so much office crap in the collections world too, I hate it. Especially if you are a fat chick like me, no bosses give you the time of day or if they have to, to answer a question or something they don't like it. Moreover, I see a trend where I work, my boss only hires really pretty, skinny, tall women. Hmmm.....doesn't his wife see this? She works there too!


I wonder if I should switch my major. Then I may loose my classes already done.
I found my niche in HR but lost that job and since then I can not get back into the HR field, I am lost trying to figure out what I want to do. Though, I want to get into the medical field I don’t know what I want to do. I thought about nursing but not sure.
Thought about Physician Assistant, but again I don’t know!!

PS. But my passion is anything television or movies. I wouldnt know how to even get started in those fields, and again being fat isn't a good thing if one wants to break into television. (Unless anyone has ideas or suggestions?)

Expunge
06-24-2011, 12:43 AM
Currently working on my B.S. in Chemistry. There are a few different fields I'm interested in for grad school - I'm planning to pay off all my student loans before diving into grad school, unless I get full funding right off the bat (unlikely). Hopefully working in the industrial sector will also give me an idea of what fields within the subject I'm really interested in! Currently very interested in pharmaceutical research & development, but the whole process is so complicated and requires so much theoretical knowledge in organic chemistry that it's a bit daunting to contemplate.

I'm a full-time student so not employed long-term, but I'm doing a paid internship at the quality control/analytical chemistry lab of a pharmaceutical company for the summer. Really interesting so far!

Ookpik
06-24-2011, 01:12 AM
What is your degree in?
I am also still working on my degree, about halfway through my Bachelor of Social Work program. I have to toot my own horn here: I got an email from my university today telling me I am on the Director's List for the School of SW! I am in the top 10% of SW students and this requires a minimum GPA of 3.5 (mine's 3.8). Not bad for someone who flunked out of the same university two decades ago for getting such low grades!

Why did you choose your particular major?
My real dream, to be honest, was to become a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. I didn't get in the first try, but was encouraged to try again. Rather than wait, I decided to go back to school and get a degree, because realistically, I might never get into the RCMP. I might, and am considering trying again after I receive my BSW...I am also considering getting my MSW in Social Justice and Diversity. If I don't become a cop, I would like to work in human rights advocacy at the UN (hey, we can all dream!).

Is your current job related to your degree?
Not applicable - yet!

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major? If so, what wo.uld you have chosen?
Sometimes I do. Sometimes I get a little overwhelmed and think about taking my credits and transferring to a university in a different province that offers a degree in both Business Administration and aviation. You get your business degree, but also a commercial pilot's license! I have a passion for all things aviation so that appeals to me, not too sure about the business degree though. I actually have taken business and accounting courses, and those fields I really excel in, but I am more interested in working with people -- hence the police and social work interest.

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree is more important than what they chose to major in?
Sometimes. I know some people who have degrees in, say, religion or folklore who managed to get cushy jobs with the federal government. Those jobs have nothing to do with what they actually studied, but the fact that they had a degree at all made them very marketable. As mentioned, I attended university many years ago, got all sorts of knowledge about different subjects, but without that piece of paper I could not get "decent" employment. I have a diploma in Travel and Tourism, a certificate in Office Administration, and lots of knowledge from university, but felt "in limbo" without that degree and unable to find any kind of job that I found desirable.

indiblue
06-24-2011, 02:01 AM
BA in Political Science and International Relations. MA in public policy hopefully in 2-3 years :)

Very much related to my career- I'm in international democracy and human rights work.

I think unless you are working in a technical field- engineering, medicine, etc- the degree doesn't really matter. Work experience matters. And because I used to live in Washington, D.C., I know that in my field at least who you KNOW (not who your father is, but how good a networker you are) is just as important.

BodyByButter
06-24-2011, 01:06 PM
I dropped out of college in 1993, four classes short of a BA in English. Since I immediately moved four hours away and back then, distance learning wasn't really what it is today, it was very difficult to go back, and most universities require X number of credits in residence.

So, I entered the workforce without a degree, and eventually started my own company. Hard work has gotten me to a seriously comfortable income and there are 12 people who work for me, from home (I own a mystery shop company.)

Working from home has allowed me to go back to school, and this fall I will finish the final class for my degree. I will be walking the line in May, at the same time as the child mentioned above graduates from high school.

In my case, getting that degree won't make any difference in my income, but it made a difference to me as a person. I wanted to not only show my high schoolers that I value education enough to finish it, but I also wanted to do it just for me. Now I am in the amazing position of being able to take any MA that I want, whether or not it's practical. I'm looking at an MA in Viking Studies. How dorky is that?

Riestrella
06-24-2011, 05:01 PM
I have a degree in Film. Whoop whoop (it gets me no jobs but it was fun!). In the UK you pick 1 major and all your classes are to do with that major. You can't pick major in one subject and then minor in another. It's great if you know what you want to do, but not if you're interested in multiple subjects.

Shannon in ATL
06-24-2011, 05:21 PM
Umm...would I change if I had it to do over again? Yes. Teaching High School and Junior High is like being a police officer, but they don't let you have a gun. I got my degree and started teaching very young, and didn't change majors, I was super focused on this "career" I thought was the right path for me. It wasn't. I am trying to find a job in research, etc. I want to do something related to education, support teachers, etc., but not be in a classroom.

I urge you to reach out to a local school and see if you can sit in on a class at a school. You will find that public school has changed A LOT since you were a student.

But if you like supervising school dances where the kids are giving each other lap dances, charging for oral sex out of the bathroom stalls, and filming themselves having sex on their smart phones, go for it!!!

(You can tell I think you should take the librarian route :))


Hehe - the reason I ditched on my student teaching in the last semester was because a student threatened me with a weapon. Which was the last straw after I was forced to pass a basketball player who had failed, had my skirt flipped up by a boy who then loudly exclaimed about my underwear and and had my supervising teacher fall asleep in class apparently under the influence of something. All extreme situations, but enough to make me bail out just in case. And this was in 1993, so I imagine it must be worse now.

SweetPeach3388
06-26-2011, 01:46 PM
I have a BA in Liberal Studies in the Great Books, which is basically the classical liberal arts education--philosophy, english, history, theology, and fine art mixed together.

I absolutely loved my undergrad study, but I had goals beyond my BA and that allowed me to choose something so obscure.

I just finished my first year of law school and I'm excited to get out into the working world after making through the next two years!

ncuneo
06-26-2011, 05:33 PM
I gave a professional BA (5 year degree) in Architecture and I also won't be going to grad school and plan to ride my prestigious school's coattails like krampus - hehe!

I am infact an architect and no I don't regret it, but I do kind of regret not going to grad school. It may have opened a few other doors for me.

MindiV
06-26-2011, 05:40 PM
I earned a bachelor of arts in news-editorial journalism and minored in English. I'm a newspaper editor, so I use my degree daily.

I, all the time, wish I'd majored in English or gone and gotten a certification for education. Teaching is such a hard thing to get into right now, I wish I was a teacher instead some days.

My sister has a bachelor's degree in English, but didn't intend to become a teacher until she realized that, around here, her degree is worthless without education attached. Now she's gone on and on in school for teaching, is certified in multiple subjects, special ed and ESL, but can't get hired no matter what her certifications are.

gothik butterfly
06-26-2011, 06:13 PM
I have a BSW (Bachelors of Social Work). If I decide to get my Masters I will be able to do it in 1 year instead of 2 (due to advanced standing) but I have to decide in the next 3 years. I'm still burnt out so I'm just not sure yet.

I always wanted to be in a helping profession and a degree in Social Work opens so many doors. Many people think of their Social Worker as a CPS county worker but there are SO many different opportunities for Social Workers.. from county CPS to juveniles, to hospitals to group homes for adults with developmental disabilities, to clinical counseling and on and on.

I worked with adults with developmental disabilities while I went to college. I also had 2 internships - 1 with a food and emergency services (rent help, diapers, bus tickets etc) and one with a supervised visitation center where i had a case load and helped people gain supervised access to their children when they were not in a position to see them privately.

I LOVED my college, my studies and everything I learned. Not only did I learn the importance of collaboration and strengths perspective for working with clients, but I learned how to be nonjudgmental and positive in my daily life. Client, friend, family or even enemy. My life has been forever changed by the enlightening experience. AND I have skills and a degree on top of that.

My current job is not related to my degree. Between graduating during the break down of the economy, getting divorced. moving and bad issues with my bi polar, I am still in the process of rebuilding my life 3 years after graduation. I do , however, have a job I really enjoy doing data entry (the other thing I'm really good at) for a government contractor on an army base. Eventually, I will probably start looking for work in my field but getting on my feet, taking care of my basic needs and stablizing my mental health have taken precedence.

No, I don't wish I would have had a different major. I came out of high school wanting to be an English teacher or a counselor. When I went back to college at 25, I knew Social Work was my field. It still is. My ultimate goal is to start a non profit Supervised Visitation Center in my county. We don't have that option for the family courts here and I think it's sorely needed.

I do believe that there are specific techniques and skills needed for many, many careers so a degree in that field is very important. But I guess it comes down to... are you looking to make money or are you looking to be happy? (or both lol) I would ALWAYS recommend a field of study that you truly enjoy. If you can make great money doing it, that's awesome too. And also remember that it's not just cramming your head with memorized facts, college is an all encompassing growing and expanding of the mind experience and no amount of money is a substitute for that :)

Kaonashi
06-26-2011, 06:56 PM
BFA in Visual Communications, starting grad school this fall to get my MFA in Design. The program has an emphasis in international design standards (which is what I'm interested in) and I'm really excited...and scared!

I'm a freelancer, so yes, I currently work in my field. And like Astrophe, I've never regretted my major but I definitely wish I attended a different school.

SpangleMagnet
06-26-2011, 07:13 PM
I don't think I've posted here so I will :p

I'm just finishing my final year of a BA in English Literature, find out which classification I get on Friday, eek! I'm going on to do a MA in Viking and Anglo-Saxon Studies, though =)

saef
06-26-2011, 07:23 PM
A dual bachelor's degree from two colleges within my university, which means I took more classes & had precious few electives. One major was journalism and the other was English with a concentration in the British novel. My major chose me, I didn't choose it. I was already a writer at 10 years old & never wavered after that. I became like one of those crabs with one enormous claw & the other one underdeveloped. I also got a masters degree from an MFA program in creative writing. Yes, I still write for a living.

I'm far enough into my career where my major doesn't matter much anymore, or where I went to school. What hiring managers look at is my work history and writing samples or clips. On occasion, the branding on my diploma has helped with fellow alumns & with snobs.

(I can't believe this, but those degrees helped me with the co-op board. For those unfamiliar with NY ways, if you want an apartment in a co-op building, you can't always just buy it. You have to be reviewed by the co-op's board, which looks at your financials & your resume & recommendations from people who know you & finally calls you in & interviews you. I sat for an hour before a panel of six people holding little binders I'd submitted to them with all my tax returns, bank statements, W-2s, letter from my boss, sheet filled out with my clubs & professional affiliations. And one man wanted to reminisce with me about my undergrad school & definitely was checking on my knowledge of it, and another went on about his wife having gone to my grad school. Deeply weird. Deeply, deeply weird. Such are the times that we live in ...)

ETA: Yes, the board approved me. I'm living in that apartment now.

ETA II: My MFA program helped me get grants & residencies & post-grad scholarships, but again, the writing samples were far more important in the end.

AnonymouslyYours
06-26-2011, 07:35 PM
I'm almost finished with my BS in Industrial and Systems Engineering :) 5 more classes + senior design

duckyyellowfeet
06-27-2011, 03:47 AM
What is your degree in?
I have a BA in English and a Single-Subject Teaching Credential, which means I can teach English for 7th-12th grades.

Why did you choose your particular major?
I've wanted to teach since I was very young. I originally wanted to teach history, but history in high school is very date/war centered, which doesn't interest me. I was a double major in English and Spanish, until I realized teaching Spanish made me want to cry. So, I finished my BA in English and went straight into my credential.

Is your current job related to your degree?
Yes, thank goodness. I did my student teaching last year, and ended up being a long-term sub when the teacher I was working under went out on medical leave. I just got a job teaching English next year at a different school in the same district.

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major? If so, what wo.uld you have chosen?
Maybe. I'm still very optimistic about teaching; my student teaching/long-term sub job was difficult but I never dreaded going to work, I enjoyed being in the classroom every day and I'm a pretty good teacher, considering. Honestly, I'm glad I have a BA in English and I don't think that it can hurt me. If I don't like teaching, I'd most likely go back to school for an MSW.


Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree (proving that they can think and use their brain to some extent ) is more important than what they chose to major in?
I think it depends on the field you intend to go into. Some jobs require degrees in very specific fields; other positions are more concerned that you have a degree. However, I think that being a confident, dedicated worker, with a good job history and networking skills matter more than just a degree.

fatgyrl
06-27-2011, 11:53 AM
What is your degree in?
Hard Knocks BS

Why did you choose your particular major?
Life took me there.

Is your current job related to your degree?
Not really, although, I am a housewife based on the decisions I made.

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major?
Probably, but I wouldn't be the person I am had I chosen a different route


Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree (proving that they can think and use their brain to some extent ) is more important than what they chose to major in?
From personal experience I have seen time and time again where having a degree at all does not make a difference. I spent 20+ years working with the developmentally disabled on a non-professional level l could dance psychological circles around the BSWs, MSWs and PhDs I encountered in the interdisciplinary team meetings.

I also have a 22 year old daughter with a BSN (with honours) and in Grad School for a FNP (MS) but continues to demonstrate that she lacks common street sense.

aliquot
06-27-2011, 04:37 PM
What is your degree in?
I have a bachelors in Molecular Biology, and a masters in Biotechnology. I'm currently in school for a phd in Microbiology and Molecular Genetics!

Why did you choose your particular major?
Because I wanted to be a mad scientist. No really.

Is your current job related to your degree?
Still in school, so yes.

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major?
Sometimes. I wish I had gone into cosmetic science or something more chemistry related since that is what cosmetics labs want. But instead I get to play with viruses, and that is fun too.

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree (proving that they can think and use their brain to some extent ) is more important than what they chose to major in? No. IMO getting a degree is about as useful now as a high school diploma. Getting a bachelors means next to nothing in the real world (especially in science). Because of the economy, businesses don't want to have to pay to train their employees so they are looking for people with even higher education and experience to hire. People with bachelors degrees are deemed not qualified for a lot of these positions because of it.

Also, IMO, getting a bachelors says almost nothing about your ability to think or use reasoning skills. You can get by in most classes just by memorizing things. No thinking necessary. I think that is one of the major flaws in the educational system as a whole. There is not enough focus on problem solving or thinking beyond what you are given, and too much focus on jumping through the teachers hoops.

I do think what major you pick says a lot more about a person, but I can't say that it really is all that important, either. I know VERY few people who have bachelors degrees who are actually now working in the field they majored in. Mostly because of the economy, and partially because they truly wanted to do something else.

I could say more but I might get myself in trouble, haha.

squishy lee
06-27-2011, 05:01 PM
What is your degree in?
Bachelors of Science in Accounting
Masters of Science in Taxation

Why did you choose your particular major?
I started in Architecture but hated the grey area of design so I began to minor in business...took my first accounting class and LOVED it! Dropped Architecture (one year away from a five year degree) and started over in Accounting. Accounting was exactly what my obsessive black/white, exact science mind needed....and I'm good at it so that helps.

Is your current job related to your degree?
Yep, I'm a tax supervisor at a bank. I wish I did more actual tax prep because I really enjoyed that part but I'd be silly to turn down a management position, right?

Do you wish you would have chosen a different major?
Not necessarily...I do miss architecture sometimes, more the architectural history part. The one thing I do regret is not choosing the college more carefully. I went to a local state college because of a boy :(....I was a great student and really could have done better, maybe even Ivy Leage, I should have at least tried.

Do you feel that the fact that a person has a degree is more important than what they chose to major in?
It depends on what you want to do. I think that 90% of people should get a college degree of some sort. It shows drive and initiative. Not to mention, the experience is life changing for most. Unless you plan on doing something licensed (ie: doctor, accountant, etc) I don't think the degree type is too terribly important.

mzKiki
06-27-2011, 10:30 PM
My degree is in Criminal Justice, I have always worked in the field (since graduating), even though since September I've been a SAHM taking graduate courses in Mental Health Counseling.
I would choose the same major if I had to do it over again simply because I love what I do (well did and will do again) and I'm good at it.
I think that when I graduated from college (1997) when the economy was good it didn't really matter what your degree was in as long as you had one. However, the economy is so bad that employers are very picky. They have more requirements and want to streamline theirwork force to people with particular skill sets and specific degrees.
My last job I was responsible for hiring case managers and when I received a resume from someone with a degree that was unrelated I wouldn't call them. Simply because there were less employees which meant more work for me and less training time that I wanted to devote to someone who maybe didn't know the basic elements of the field.
So my only advice to you is to follow your dreams but temper them with practicality.

SouthLake
06-28-2011, 12:40 AM
My degree is in English, and I'm working for the same company I worked for before my degree, though in a different position. (accounts payable to account manager for a commercial paint company) So, no, my degree doesn't match my job.

Originally I got my degree in English (which I enjoyed every minute of, btw) because I wanted to teach. But, before I started my credential, I was burned out from finishing my BA in three years, and there were very few full time jobs in my state.

Since I am currently working my butt off to get into and through nursing school,yes, I guess you could say I picked a different major :)

As for the degree being more important than the major, it's a toss up. My husband doesn't have a degree, and in his field, a degree in anything would get him further than his years of experience. (weird, I know) I can also say that I am eligible to apply for more jobs simply because I have a degree. However, my job ceiling is fairly limited, based on the degree I do have.