Weight Loss Support - Why do the slightest schedule changes derail diet and exercise programs?




greenlove62
06-21-2011, 03:54 PM
It is so amazing how the slightest change in one’s schedule can completely derail a diet and exercise program!

But thank God that ever since I've been journaling I have begun to recognize triggers that affect my dieting and exercise program.

The most damaging triggers I have discovered are disruptions to my daily schedule. I am usually an early morning riser and really enjoy working out during that time because it allows me to take my time. Recently my work schedule changed and I had to be to work by 7 am. When I tried to do my early morning exercise routine I found myself getting stressed and watching the clock. Boy! It took all of the fun out of my ritual.

Because I have become more aware of “my triggers,” thanks to the article “Weight Loss Management Psychology” by Malcolm Baptiste, I was able to quickly realize I needed to make a change or I would eventually stop exercising all together. I knew this would happen because in the past it always happened!

In the past I would have tried to push through and keep my old schedule, but I now realize I must develop an alternative schedule. Although I thought I would be too tired to exercise after work, it is working out very well! I actually get a burst of energy afterwards and I have found that I am sleeping better also!

Being able to make the mind body connection is a powerful tool to my weight loss program and I know it will help you too!!!

Here’s to our success! Taking it one day at a time!!

check out the article it's great!!!!


berryblondeboys
06-21-2011, 04:10 PM
Haven't read the article yet, but I know that changes in schedules throws me for a loop too. it's what ultimately led to my downfall 13 years ago. I switched jobs and schedules and finding time to exercise became impossible. It affected my eating too - so crazy how everything is connected.

I'm kind of there now. The kids finish school tomorrow (finally). Now I have kids home all day. I was also exercising in the evening - like after 9 pm. I just can't do that any more for some reason - it's become a chore, so I'm changing things up and heading to the gym earlier. Which is all good and better, but now it interferes with our dinner hour, so I'm having to juggle dinner around because of switching my exercise time and so on.

But it is true, now that I'm aware of it, I can deal with it better as I'm sure I'll face it again as I plan to go from being a stay at home mom to a working mom after this summer. There's another big curve ball in the schedule!

berryblondeboys
06-21-2011, 04:12 PM
Here is the link to the article for those looking for it:

http://goarticles.com/article/Weight-Loss-Management-Psychology/4784467/


JohnP
06-21-2011, 04:24 PM
I'm unconvinced this is true as far as eating is concerned. Sounds like justification to me.

I can see how exercise could be a challenge given a schedule change but making good food choices is something you can do where ever you're eating.

It's a mindset change. Food is fuel.

berryblondeboys
06-21-2011, 04:29 PM
I'm unconvinced this is true as far as eating is concerned. Sounds like justification to me.

I can see how exercise could be a challenge given a schedule change but making good food choices is something you can do where ever you're eating.

It's a mindset change. Food is fuel.

This is true, but if your schedule is thrown, your eating times can be thrown.

For instance, what I'm dealing with right now. We usually eat around 6:30 pm when my husband gets home from work. However, last night and tonight the fitness class I want to take is at or before 6:30 pm. So, We need to either eat before then, or after then. Eating before is difficult because my husband isn't home yet and I don't want to go on a full stomach. Eating after means I won't have dinner (and neither will anyone else) until after 8 pm - not ideal either. My husband 'could' come home earlier if he didn't exercise before work, but to change that means changing his schedule too.

It's a big headache right now and so, it would be really easy (reallllly easy ) to order pizza and just be done with meal planning.

So, call it an excuse, but it does affect eating - or could.

It derailed me before with a switch of job because I went from having normal hours (leave the house at 7 am, by home by 6 pm) to a job that I had to leave the house at 7:30 am and might have to be at work until 2 am regularly. Stuff like that - so yes, schedule can affect eating.

gagalu
06-21-2011, 05:10 PM
for me, it happens because it's so much easier to make excuses that i can justify to myself.

lin43
06-21-2011, 05:20 PM
I think that people who have always struggled with weight loss (yo-yo dieters) have a unique relationship with food that "normal" eaters do not. In Ann Fletchers Thin for Life, a book about the habits of people who have lost and KEPT off weight, she notes that those who succeed do so by stringently staying focused on their food intake, their weight (most weigh daily), etc. That sort of focus requires concentration, and when we are faced with a change to our schedules, that concentration is disrupted. So, rather than planning out what we will eat for lunch every day (and preparing it the night before, for example, we lose focus and just grab whatever is on hand. We are so consumed with the new schedule and the accompanying changes that we do not maintain the focus that is required of those who do not have a "normal" relationship with food. This is why changes in schedule often result in weight gain.

irishlad
06-21-2011, 06:21 PM
I think part of it is its because people (not pinpointing you, it stands for us all, in different scenarios and situations) lets it affect us (as others have said, its easier make excuses, and drop our focus). food is food, the choice is there, ok the healthiest may not be the most convenient, but maybe make a batch of dinner than can be froze, that way it can be microwaved quickly and ye could eat at different times? (I often make 5 or 6 dinners in a pot and freeze in individual containers, when I want them I know I can have dinner in 10 minutes). Do the kids cycle/walk, could you get them to cycle/walk and follow them walking, that way they are healthy, outdoors and enjoying themselves and you get your exercise in too? Or can you go to the gym or a walk before the kids and your husband get up? Write down your options and talk with everyone at home about it and try develop a plan that works for everyone.

bronzeager
06-22-2011, 04:48 AM
I teach at a university, across three different campuses. My schedule changes every semester, plus classes can be different every day, so I have to adapt to that and be flexible. You can prepare mentally as well as logistically for change. I learned if I have to go to the gym at a busy time I won't be able to use the elliptical machine or the weights as I would like to, so I'm prepared to switch to something else as long as I get a variety in sometime during the week. Hey, maybe I'll use the rowing machine today, or run outside on the track if the weather's nice, or even swim, which I can do because there's always a bathing suit, towel and change of gym clothes in my bag/car.

At home I always have a couple of emergency meals portioned out in the freezer (planned leftovers from things I've cooked earlier). I learned a repertoire of at least three different healthy complete meals that I can put together in 10 minutes from a can (beans, tuna, salmon, sardines) and whatever protein and vegetable are in the refrigerator. I have my set of lock and lock boxes, fabric cooler bag and icepack so that I can pack meals and snacks for outside the house and enjoy a prepared homemade "picnic" anywhere, any time; at the university, outside the gym, sitting at the table at home. Google "bento lunch" or laptop lunch and you'll see lots of ideas. You can bento breakfast, dinner, or snack too. Are the kids of an age that they could be involved in prep, or at least give input? Does dinner have to be hot and cooked? Maybe they would be excited about a "picnic" for dinner.

JayEll
06-22-2011, 10:44 AM
Changes derail your program because you let them. That's really what it comes down to.

Unscheduled lunch out? You have to stay on your food plan. If your food plan doesn't have ways to cope with that, it's too inflexible. Early morning meeting mess up your workout schedule? You have to fit in your exercise some other way, at some other time.

In other words, adaptability is key--that and making sure you don't just toss everything out because of one little bump in the road.

Jay

fattymcfatty
06-22-2011, 01:38 PM
Yeah, we still have the crazy days where I don't cook. The difference is, we have our go to places where we can get an on-plan, 500 calorie or less meal. There are about 3 within a 5 mile radius of home that we have "standby" items. It is no longer "I didn't have time to cook, let's just get a pizza". Now it is, "let's go pick up something healthy". The big difference between these places, is that it is cafeteria style, but no drive through. We no longer do a drive through, so that has been the big lifestyle change. This has been the hardest on hubby, because he was lazy and loved the ease of a drive through. Now, after being on plan for a year, he has finally changed and doesn't mind stopping in to pick up a bite. But it took commitment for the first 3 months or so. The thing that derails me is eating at my parents' house. I 80% of the time end up eating badly when we go over there. So that is my new challenge I need to focus on.

SCraver
06-22-2011, 05:54 PM
Changes derail your program because you let them. That's really what it comes down to.

Unscheduled lunch out? You have to stay on your food plan. If your food plan doesn't have ways to cope with that, it's too inflexible. Early morning meeting mess up your workout schedule? You have to fit in your exercise some other way, at some other time.

In other words, adaptability is key--that and making sure you don't just toss everything out because of one little bump in the road.

Jay

YES! ^^^ This! ^^^ I think what determines long term weight loss and maintenance is the ability to adapt to... well... LIFE. Life is always changing. Jobs, schedules, children's schdules, plans, activities, etc. You need to have a way to deal with changes. I keep frozen meals in the freezer that I can either toss in a pan or (even better!) toss directly in to the microwave. If I can't work out at lunch one day - I try to squeeze it in in the evening or plan for a longer work out the next day.

ETA: I also keep Celeste frozen pizza's in the freezer - if we are craving pizza or are too busy to do anything else, I can pop those in the toaster and have a single serving, calorie controlled pizza.