Weight Loss News and Current Events - In Defense of a Daily Doughnut




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mackinac19
05-26-2011, 05:19 PM
I don't have enough posts to include a link, but google the title of this thread to see the article....


luckymommy
05-26-2011, 05:24 PM
There you go: http://health.yahoo.net/articles/mens-health/in-defense-of-a-daily-doughnut

I read this article, but I can't say that I agree. For me, if I have a donut, it really messes with my blood sugar and triggers a hunger that wouldn't normally be there had I just had something with protein and fiber for the same amount of calories. I do think that it would work for some, but not for everyone.

kait628
05-26-2011, 05:28 PM
I can't say I agree either. If I have a donut, it makes me crave more sugar immediately and will set me off on a binge more often than not because my brain goes "You've already blown your diet for the day so why not eat whatever you want and start again tomorrow". Very sad, because I've had to avoid them altogether and let me tell you, avoiding them does not make me crave them any less :(


kaplods
05-26-2011, 05:52 PM
I agree with the guilt-elimination part, but I think that should be the main point of the article. I even agree that eliminating the "forbidden" mindset.

One of the biggest differences "this time" has been my dedication to guilt elimination. If I slip up, I'm not lazy, crazy, stupid or bad.

I also don't look at foods as "forbidden." Forbidden means someone is telling me I can't have it (which does sort of make me want it). When I don't look at foods as forbidden or "bad," it makes them less tempting.


I've never been a smoker. I've taken just enough puffs of cigarettes to know I don't like them. But I don't avoid cigarettes because I see them as forbidden to me. I don't like them, or what I know they're doing to my body.

Even as a kid, I avoided donuts on an empty stomach (which meant breakfast was out) not because I was fat and they were forbidden, but because they made me nauseous (I probably had blood sugar issues even then).

I've learned that some foods make me sick or cause skin issues. I view these foods almost as allergens (even though I'm not sure actual allergies are involved). I could eat them, but if I did I would suffer unfortunate consequences so I choose not to. And if I do eat them, either out of impulse or planning, I will have to deal with consequences but guilt is not one of them. "Duh, why did I do that" does cross my mind, but I don't allow guilt, because guilt does seem to trigger the all/nothing "I've blown it I might as well binge" mentality that is counterproductive.

I do try to stay away from saying or thinking "I can't eat x ..." and substitute it with "I choose not to eat x..."

For me, it's about looking at super high-carb foods as "not good for me," rather than "bad" because "bad" makes me feel bad/naughty/guilty for eating them.

I don't see eating, or even overeating and obesity as "bad" in that sense. I think it's important to take the value judgement out of the process.

I do think that taking the "bad" out of eating does help the process of losing weight.

dragonlady1978
05-26-2011, 07:55 PM
I don't think we have to eliminate any particular food, even doughnuts, to be healthy and slim.

But obviously there are many of us who can't just have certain foods, not because that food itself is necessarily damaging, but because it makes us falter in our control. I am definitely in that group.

If you can have a doughnut and leave it at that there's no reason not to.

I get surprised all the time by nutrition facts, like that if I have the salad at mcdonalds with the dressing I may as well have had a quarter pounder. A regular doughnut is only around 250 calories. My healthy breakfast has about that many anyway, so calorically there isn't really a difference. The problem is that after a doughnut I want to eat the entire box.

milmin2043
05-26-2011, 11:57 PM
“If you give yourself permission to eat something, it’s less forbidden and you’ll want it less,” says Kronberg

This statement is most of the reason why I was 100 lbs. overweight. I never denied myself anything, and it certainly didn't make me want food less.

krampus
05-27-2011, 12:35 AM
I get and agree with the author's message, but this doesn't work for me. Junk food, cocaine - easier to have none than to have just a little.

KylieH
05-27-2011, 12:43 AM
I can't say I agree either. If I have a donut, it makes me crave more sugar immediately and will set me off on a binge more often than not because my brain goes "You've already blown your diet for the day so why not eat whatever you want and start again tomorrow". Very sad, because I've had to avoid them altogether and let me tell you, avoiding them does not make me crave them any less :(

You and I are exactly alike! I learned awhile back that it was easier for me to not indulge than it was to try and stop.
:cool: