Weight Watchers - 1988 Weight Watchers Plan




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talka
05-25-2011, 02:29 AM
Hello! I would love to find a copy of the Weight Watchers 1988 (?) plan-the one wiith the boxes that you check off. That version worked so well for me, would like to try it again. Anyone know anything about that plan? Thanks!!


kaplods
05-25-2011, 02:48 AM
I don't have the 1988 plan, but I follow an exchange plan much like it. I chose a lower carb exchange plan (called the high protein plan) that I adapted from the hillbilly housewife website (I'll try to post the link. They changed the website and things aren't as easy to find).


Here it is!

http://healthy.hillbillyhousewife.com/foodplans.htm

Here's a list of the basic exchanges

http://healthy.hillbillyhousewife.com/exchanges.htm






Another similar plan is the one found on the tops.org website (in 1200, 1500, and 1800 calorie plans).

They have a printable weekly food log with the boxes to check off with a main box for the 1200 calorie plan and then the additional exchanges for the 1500 and 1800 below that.



http://www.tops.org/TOPSTools/TOPSToolsDocs/ExchangeRecordFoodDiary.pdf



I had to make my own worksheet with my spreadsheet program, because I couldn't find one online that was low-carb. I also borrowed a concept from the old WW plans and added a few "optional" exchanges that I can use intercheangeably between milk, protein, bread, and fruit exchanges.




And here's a printable one-page review sheet of exchange values (I printed this at half size to stick in my dayplanner)


http://www.tops.org/TOPSTools/TOPSToolsDocs/FoodExchangeGroups.pdf





if you go directly to the tops.org website and select tools, there's a bunch of other helpful exchange plan documents too


The great thing about exchange plans is most are interchangeable (most use the same exchanges as those first developed in the 1950's by the American Dietetic Association and the American Diabetic Association).

I collect exchange plan cookbooks and any Weight Watcher cookbook before 1997 can be used, as well Richard Simmons Cookbooks, Joanna Lund's Healthy Exchanges. The only one that I've found that is a little different (but still easily converted into standard exchanges) is the DASH program.


There's quite a few of us exchangers on here, but we don't post regularly enough to get our own forum.

Koshka
05-25-2011, 02:51 AM
I don't have a copy of it. It was the plan (or close to it) when I originally joined in 1989 and got to goal in 1991. It was an exchange plan. So many breads a day, so many proteins, fruit, veggies, fat and milk. I think you got a certain number of floating exchanges that you could use for bread, protein and maybe fruit. I almost always used those for extra bread. Then you got a certain number of optional calories a week.

Truthfully, I still think that exchanges are a great plan since it really helps you to eat in a more healthy way.

The WW plan was similar to diabetic exchanges and I think TOPS does an exchange plan.

What made it work for me though with WW were the floating exchanges and having the optional calories so I don't know if TOPS or diabetic exchanges have anything similar.


Koshka
05-25-2011, 02:54 AM
Kaplods

I'm curious. How does TOPS or other exchange programs handle foods that aren't really exchanges? That is, one of the things that I liked about the WW exchange program at the time was that if I was at a birthday party I could eat a small piece of cake which didn't fit into any of the exchanges but would count against optional calories. Or I could occasionally have a piece of candy and count that as optional calories. I remember once looking into some exchange programs and they didn't seem to allow any of that at all. I didn't mind the exchanges and mostly eating healthy but didn't like the idea of never being to eat a piece of cake or candy at all.

Does TOPS have some mechanism to allow for that?

kaplods
05-25-2011, 03:29 AM
I also found two books on my "exchange plan cookbook wishlist" that might help you find the 1988 plan (or one very close to it).


The Weight Watcher cookbooks don't always include the program information (which I find annoying), but according to Amazon.com listings these both have the program basics and food lists as well (and the prices start as low as .01 plus $3.99 shipping. There are even a few used sellers who qualify for the SuperSaver free shipping on orders of $25 or more).

These are books I don't have yet, so I can't guarantee the information, but usually the amazon reviews are pretty accurate, especially if you can find at least two reviewers saying the same thing.







Weight Watchers Quick Success Program Cookbook (Plume) by Jean Nidetch (Paperback - Jul 1, 1990)


Weight Watchers Quick Start Plus Program Cookbook (Including Personal Choice Food Selections) by Jean Nidetch and Weight Waters International (1986)

kaplods
05-25-2011, 03:46 AM
Kaplods

I'm curious. How does TOPS or other exchange programs handle foods that aren't really exchanges? That is, one of the things that I liked about the WW exchange program at the time was that if I was at a birthday party I could eat a small piece of cake which didn't fit into any of the exchanges but would count against optional calories. Or I could occasionally have a piece of candy and count that as optional calories. I remember once looking into some exchange programs and they didn't seem to allow any of that at all. I didn't mind the exchanges and mostly eating healthy but didn't like the idea of never being to eat a piece of cake or candy at all.

Does TOPS have some mechanism to allow for that?

Joanna Lund's Healthy Exchanges (if I'm remembering correctly) has both optional calories and floating exchanges (although I don't remember if she calls these floating exchanges or something else. It might be flexible exchanges).

But at any rate, there's no magic in exchange plans, so you can tweak any of them to fit your own needs (especially if you're only making relatively minor "trades" rather than for example deciding that you want to eliminate an entire exchange category - say deciding you don't want to eat any vegetables).

In diabetic exchanges, they often don't allow "optional calories" or "floating exchanges" because the carb counts have to be more precise to control blood sugar.

But if you're not diabetic there's no reason you can't tweak any plan to fit your needs. That's what I did. I took the Hillbilly Housewife's 1500 calorie plan as my minimum exchanges. Then I added another category for "Flexible exchanges" and gave myself 6 "optional exchanges" (I could spend those exchanges on fruit, bread, protein, or milk exchange or 2 fat exchanges, essentially on 60-80 calories of just about anything)

I could just have easily chosen the 1500 calorie plan as my minimum and given myself 300 optional calories - or the 1200 calorie plan and 600 optional calories.



I don't have a copy of it. It was the plan (or close to it) when I originally joined in 1989 and got to goal in 1991. It was an exchange plan. So many breads a day, so many proteins, fruit, veggies, fat and milk. I think you got a certain number of floating exchanges that you could use for bread, protein and maybe fruit. I almost always used those for extra bread. Then you got a certain number of optional calories a week.

Truthfully, I still think that exchanges are a great plan since it really helps you to eat in a more healthy way.

The WW plan was similar to diabetic exchanges and I think TOPS does an exchange plan.

What made it work for me though with WW were the floating exchanges and having the optional calories so I don't know if TOPS or diabetic exchanges have anything similar.

As I mentioned, TOPS and diabetic exchanges don't, but I also really liked that aspect of the program, so I added it into my own program as I mentioned above.


I do have a WW program book around here somewhere (from the 1990's, I believe) and the one thing I'm glad that I did not incorporate from the WW plan is the slow roll-out of food choices (the first week you were only allowed certain foods for each of the exchanges, and you had to wait until like the 6th week to get the full food choice list). I don't think there was any benefit to that except making sure new members attended at least six weeks of meetings (a practice WW still does. You can't get the full program on your first visit, they drag it out to keep you coming in).





Another book I highly recommend is the book Exchanges for All Occasions
(the 4th edition if you can find it, because this edition gives you instructions on how to calculate exchanges from nutrition labels).

Snowwhite7
06-02-2011, 04:36 PM
I have a copy of the 1988 WW plan. How can I get it to you?

Snowwhite7
06-02-2011, 04:41 PM
Here is the check list. I re-typed it because I had so much success with it I wanted to keep it forever. I go on/off whenver I need to get back on track.

Koshka
06-02-2011, 04:51 PM
I have a copy of the 1988 WW plan. How can I get it to you?

1988 was the year I first joined WW. I looked at your plan and it was familiar to me but I recall that you also got some floating exchanges and optional calories. Do you recall what those were?

Snowwhite7
06-06-2011, 01:47 PM
I'm sorry. The only information I have is the plan that was posted.

BettyBooty
06-06-2011, 01:49 PM
So, was it like Richard Simmon's Deal a Meal? I saw a DAM kit on ebay recently for about $15.

city54
09-02-2011, 07:19 PM
I have a copy of the 1988 WW plan. How can I get it to you?

I really would like to have a copy of the ww 1988 plan it really worked for me can you e-mail it to me or send it to me at 28 wing st new bedford ma thanks

Lovely
09-03-2011, 03:57 AM
City54 - The above person had attached the plan to her post in a Word Document that you could easily save and print out.

PS - This is an open forum and you may want to remove your street address from your post.

CandyRun
01-20-2012, 04:51 PM
I, like most of you were looking for the old "Exchange" program and I also lost weight on the plan in 1988 and became a lifetime member. I searched for and found the book "Weight Watchers Quick Success Program Cookbook", Every thing you need is in that book except the planner worksheet that you write on each day. I have also tried the Points Momentum plan, Great plan but, I don't really like the new Points Plus. I gained some weight back. Hope this was helpful. CandyRun (sugarless) :D

Ithinkso
04-12-2012, 04:18 PM
Hello,

Are you still interested in having the 1990 copy of weight watchers plan? I think what I have is the 1990 - I'm not sure though. If you are still interested, I could type a few things, and you can see if that is what you want.

It is about exchanges - it might be the one you need.

sayone5
10-15-2012, 04:45 PM
Hello,

Are you still interested in having the 1990 copy of weight watchers plan? I think what I have is the 1990 - I'm not sure though. If you are still interested, I could type a few things, and you can see if that is what you want.

It is about exchanges - it might be the one you need.

I'm new here but I'm looking the for 1990 copy of the weight watcher plan? Do you still have it? I'm pretty sure that is the one I was on and lost weight. I just cannot follow that points plan.:)

sayone5
01-07-2013, 10:07 AM
I'm very much still interested in this. Sorry I haven't responded I lost the link to this site and just found it. Thanks

merrymarie53
04-03-2013, 02:12 PM
I have 1988 quick success plans from week 3 to week 15 I think I lent 1 and 2 out and never got em back

michelle47
05-24-2013, 09:51 AM
Does anyone know what the floating exchanges you get and what week you add then in? Please help
:carrot:

michelle47
05-24-2013, 09:56 AM
Does it list floating exchanges???? I need to know how many floating exchanges you get and what weeks..please help I have 1988 quick success plans from week 3 to week 15 I think I lent 1 and 2 out and never got em back

michelle47
05-24-2013, 09:57 AM
Needing to know how many float exchanges you get in each week. Your help is desperately needed

Karen
06-06-2013, 10:53 PM
If you still need the info on floating exchanges, you get (1) in week 5.

cjones101
07-17-2013, 12:54 PM
I'm looking for the late 1980's Weight Watchers plan also. I have the check off sheet but what I need is the allowed foods that are listed in the booklets. Especially the quick start. I've been looking for this for a few years now and I'd really appreciate anything anyone could send to me. Thanks!

kaplods
07-17-2013, 02:25 PM
I'm looking for the late 1980's Weight Watchers plan also. I have the check off sheet but what I need is the allowed foods that are listed in the booklets. Especially the quick start. I've been looking for this for a few years now and I'd really appreciate anything anyone could send to me. Thanks!


If you can't find the food lists, you can use any diabetic food exchange list, such as the Choose Your Food booklet or an exchange resource such as the book Exchanges for All Occasions or the food lists available on diabetes sited or frugalabundance website.

During the first weeks, tho old WW plans would limit your choices, each week allowing you more choices. There's really no need though to do this, as there's no reason to do this for weight loss purposes.

In the past, and until recently, WW often used a graduated approach for two reasons that have nothing to do with weight loss, but more to do with marketing and keeping you coming to meetings (nothing wrong with that, but if you're already familiar with the complete program, even if you have to refresh your memory, and not going to the meetings you don't have to bother with the baby-steps. The reasons: 1. A gradual roll-out meant you had to attend 4 - 8 meetings before you got the complete plan. 2. Starting simply, with fewer choices would not overwhelm newbies who had never dieted before or people who had no experience whatsoever in food grouping.

The limited choices does not improve weight loss, it just makes the job easier for newbies. Since you're not a newbie, you don't need the "dumbed down" baby step version.

forkeeps
07-17-2013, 11:35 PM
Kaplods, there's no graduated program now. You get the entire program on the first day. Unless you are talking about the extra little pep talks at the end of your first two meetings (Spaces and Routines) but even that info is available in the stuff you get on the first day.

kaplods
07-18-2013, 01:10 AM
Kaplods, there's no graduated program now. You get the entire program on the first day. Unless you are talking about the extra little pep talks at the end of your first two meetings (Spaces and Routines) but even that info is available in the stuff you get on the first day.


Actually, I'm very glad to hear it. I'll edit my post, as I realize I have not been on WW on it's current system (but was on the one before), and I just assumed that a graduated roll out was still part of this program as it has been for the last 30 - 40 years.

I'm really glad they've given that up, it always annoyed me.

kelijpa
07-22-2013, 10:29 PM
Interesting reading, I did love the exchange plan, it worked great for me. Points worked well for me as well, once I got the hang of it.

Kaplods, as usual you are a wealth of helpful information, and thanks for the reminder about the old WW program, I always remember you couldn't eat tomatoes the first week, hard to imagine today, I think Atkins had a similar tomato ban in the early stages...poor tomatoes.

Thanks for the info! :sunny:

stratcat45
08-14-2013, 11:01 AM
I have a WW Cookbook dated 1994 that has how to do the plan in the front - it is some sort of exchange plan; would gladly copy those pages and email to whomever wants it!

canadianwoman
08-28-2013, 02:21 AM
I have a WW Cookbook dated 1994 that has how to do the plan in the front - it is some sort of exchange plan; would gladly copy those pages and email to whomever wants it!

I would love to have a copy. My email is jaimbeth at ya hoo dot ca

seabiscuit
09-11-2013, 02:07 PM
Thank you Snow White-

That is very helpful!!

LouinLexky
01-08-2014, 09:39 PM
I have the 1988 silver anniversary edition of the WW "quick and Easy Menu Cookbook," which has an 8-week plan of daily menues completew/ optional calories noted. It contains also 12 months' worth of menu plans by week, offering some specific recipes of interest. Post any questions regarding this book, & I will try to answer them. The old WW was, I think, a bit easier to follow instead of counting so many different points in recent WW programs.

Becky Quilts
01-09-2014, 11:50 AM
Overeating does not lead to rapture: It leads to burping and farting and being so sick that you can't think of anything but how full you are. That's not love; that's suffering.

I had to laugh at this! Thanks for the truth; I have to write this down.

Koshka
01-09-2014, 03:39 PM
I have the 1988 silver anniversary edition of the WW "quick and Easy Menu Cookbook," which has an 8-week plan of daily menues completew/ optional calories noted. It contains also 12 months' worth of menu plans by week, offering some specific recipes of interest. Post any questions regarding this book, & I will try to answer them. The old WW was, I think, a bit easier to follow instead of counting so many different points in recent WW programs.

I first joined WW in 1988 and got to lifetime under that program in 1990. Without question, calculating points plus is much easier than it was to count exchanges. Maybe if you cooked everything from scratch it was easy but for people eating out or buying packaged food in the grocery store it was not easy. You also got optional calories for things that either weren't part of the exchanges (sweets for example) or where you went over your exchanges. For example, you could have 2 fat exchanges a day. If you went above that, then you had to use optional calories for the amount you went over. Knowing how to calculate that for restaurant meals, for example, was anything but easy.

Nowadays if the restaurant posts nutritional info, calculating points is pretty easy. But it would still be a challenge to do the calculations for the 1988 program.

I actually do think that exchanges are a better program because it teaches you to eat a more balanced diet. But, it is not nearly as easy to calculate as points.

canadianwoman
01-15-2014, 10:46 AM
I always remember you couldn't eat tomatoes the first week, hard to imagine today, I think Atkins had a similar tomato ban in the early stages...poor tomatoes.


I cannot imagine not having tomatoes in a healthy diet. ..... and now I want a tomato sandwich. LOL

WantToLose17
01-30-2014, 11:00 PM
I just bought the book for $1.97 at Amazon. I go to TOPS where they use an exchange system so this book is awesome because of all the recipes. It is worth your $2 and $5 shipping to get it if you really like this sort of plan.

GypsyChick12
10-30-2014, 11:25 AM
I am searching for the program materials for the 1986 WW Quick Start Plus Program. I lost 65 pounds effortlessly on this program. Over the years I have gained back the weight and have tried and failed at the WW Points Programs. I want to get back on the Quick Start Plan. I got the quick start plus cookbook; but, I am looking for the food lists and any other supplemental weekly pamphlets..... I saw something on here, but it is a Microsoft Works document, and I don't have MS Works. I need a pdf. to be able to download. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Also would like to connect with others who are following this program for moral support. Thanks.

doublehmom
12-02-2014, 06:59 AM
I have part of the program that you get at meetings except step 3 and 7. Step. 7 in the intro books says you will learn how to bank 300 calories for special occasions, does anyone remember how to do that?